DS has eczema on back of hands-suggestions for hand wipes?

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 8:40am
Marlowe's picture
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Joined: 03/13/2007 - 09:00

I've read EVERYWHERE on this website where I should buy stock in antibacterial wipes, to use to keep DS' hands clean after playing on playgrounds, any outings, etc.

Problem is he still has BAD spots of eczema on the backs of his hands, and I NEVER use wipes, for fear it would irritate his eczema. His skin is VERY sensitive.

Does anyone know if just plain sensitive skin baby wipes would do the trick of ridding of peanut protein residue, or does it have to be an antibacterial wipe?

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 10:56am
KaraLH's picture
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Joined: 10/11/2006 - 09:00

I can't really give you an answer as we do not worry so much about traces of peanut protiens. But, one of my DD's has severe eczema too and especially bad on the back of her hands.
I'm a firm believer in wipes and antibacterial hand cleansers. In our case we have no choice but to follow with a cream. Otherwise her hands bleed. (actually they bleed anyway, but we try to keep it to a minimum!)
It can be a pain in the butt sometimes but even regular wipes bother my DD's hands.
Good luck!
------------------
Kara mom to 4, wife to 1
Elise 5- (eczema, NKA)
Mary 3- (egg, peanut, beef, pork, chicken, turkey, organge, avoiding: tree nuts, shellfish, most dairy, eczema)
Franklin 21 mos- (eczema, NKA)
Cecelia 4 mos-(NKA)

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 11:52am
saknjmom's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

My son has really bad eczema and we have always avoided the wipes because they are highly irritating to his hands.
I didn't know about his pa until he was 4, so i wasn't wiping him down before that. I have always just washed his hands with mild soap and water. I kept unscented baby wipes for times where sink wasn't available.
Honestly, I am not a fan of antibacterial soaps and cleaners. There are many articles of interest about how the use of antibacterial stuff actually lowers our resistance. I refuse to buy antibacterial hand soap...I think it has not helped the immune system of people and especially children.
We have plain ivory and jergens soap in our dispensers in the bathroom.
Additionally, they are finding t he ingredient Triclosan in antibacterial soap my be harmful to long term health.
Our bodies build immunity by being introduced to little strains of bacteria during the normal course of a day. If we are constantly wiping out traces that would not make us sick, but would help immunity, we're going to be in supervirus heck before we know it...
[This message has been edited by saknjmom (edited April 05, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 3:30pm
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

I don't think "antibacterial" wipes are necessary. Any kind of wet wipe will work since you are just physically scrubbing off the protein. You don't need to kill the protein--in fact antibacterial hand gels don't work to remove peanut protein.
We have had good luck with Kirkland baby wipes. They are alcohol free, so they are not too drying. I get them by the case at Costco. Check ingredients on some baby wipes--they may contain shea butter or milk derivatives which some people avoid due to nut or dairy allergies.
Cathy
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Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 4 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 3:37pm
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

I don't know what you are doing to treat the eczema on his hands, but here is what worked for us:
Soak the affected skin in warm water for 20 min. every evening. Pat dry and *immediately* coat the eczema with plain Vaseline. If you have medicated creams, put that on *over* the Vaseline. Then cover the hands with lightweight cotton socks or gloves (to keep the Vaseline from rubbing off on everything.) Wear the gloves overnight and remove them in the morning. Use Cetaphil liquid cleanser when washing hands instead of soap during the day.
This worked like a miracle on the large patches of bleeding, raw eczema that DS had on his ankles.
I hope you find something that works--I know how uncomfortable eczema is! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
Cathy
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Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 4 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 10:37pm
krasota's picture
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Joined: 04/24/2000 - 09:00

I can't use any baby wipes--they all contain stuff that I react to (aloe, lanolin, parabens, imid. urea, fragrance, chamomile, lavender, etc.). Every once in awhile, huggies or pampers comes out with a wipe that is free of everything nasty, but they haven't had any options in several years.
Kroger has some lemon-scented wipes in their picnic section similar to the kind KFC puts (or used to put) in their silverware trays. I've used those on occasion, but they're not very wet or scrubby.
I often carry some folded paper towels and a bottle of water, mostly so I can wash off the antibacterial **** folks insist on using before touching grocery carts.
ygg

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 10:37pm
bonestable's picture
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Joined: 04/05/2005 - 09:00

We use regular baby wipes (Huggies natural unscented, which are OK for my DD, although they do contain aloe which may be irritating for some).
I believe it is more the action of wiping and scrubbing that removes the proteins onto the wipe. The fact that they are wet wipes helps shift them too. The antibacterial agents don't affect the food proteins.
When my DD had bad eczema on the backs of her hands I would concentration on wiping the palms and the fingers.
I too try to avoid antibacterial agents as much as possible.

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 12:10am
Marlowe's picture
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Joined: 03/13/2007 - 09:00

Thanks for all your thoughts and suggestions...I too agree that antibacterials are just NOT necessary for much of anything, as far as I'm concerned.
And, Momcat, thanks for the tip on how to help heal the eczema...my allergist has suggested the same thing only to put the medication on BEFORE putting Vaseline or Eucerin cream on top...I just can't get darling 14 mo. old DS to keep the socks on his hands...may have to wait til after he zonks out at night and then do it?

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 12:30am
saknjmom's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

I also put the cortisone first, followed by the cream. Sometimes i mix them together. When DS was little, I would do all of this while he was sleeping and got rather good at it.
But, occassionally the cream would sting if he had a lot of cracks and he would wake up crying.
So sad.
He's 9 now and still hates to be lubed up! I actually lubed up his hands and covered them with socks last night!
[This message has been edited by saknjmom (edited April 06, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 2:11am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by saknjmom:
[b]occassionally the cream would sting if he had a lot of cracks and he would wake up crying. [/b]
This is why our allergist recommended putting the Vaseline on first. He says that the medication soaks thru the Vaseline. He also says it is very important to put the Vaseline on right after soaking to keep the moisture in the skin. All I know is, it worked!
For the child who won't keep the socks on--try soaking and then a light coating of Vaseline to hold the moisture in his skin. After he falls asleep, put on the creams and socks.
Also, our allergist prescribed a stronger steroid cream. He says it's better to knock down the inflammation right away and then just use plain Vaseline rather than using a low strength steriod for a long period of time. Also, if there are cracks and crustiness, there could be an infection in the eczema. When it gets like that he also recommends using antibiotic ointment.
Cathy
[This message has been edited by Momcat (edited April 06, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 2:38am
saknjmom's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

That's a good idea momcat. Problem with DS is that vaseline and petroleum creams further aggravate his skin. So we use a cream based cortisone and a cream.
Sometimes I wet the socks wring them out so they are just damp, put those on and another dry pair over the top. This helps keep moisture in too. I've also done this with pajamas.

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