DS allergic to milk & soy - we must use rice milk - anyone else?

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 5:32am
mfharris's picture
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Joined: 02/21/2007 - 09:00

I took my 19mo. son into the allergist today for testing because his eyes are always watering and he has a chronic cough. He also has diarrhea almost everyday, and a red rash around his mouth. He tested positive (2+ each) to cow's milk, soy, and grass. We were given Zyrtec for the watering eyes, a rx for Pulmicort for his nebulizer, and told to switch to rice milk. He also ordered a chest x-ray for his cough - I'm happy to finally find a doctor who is thorough!

I'm concerned with the nutritional value of rice milk:

Cow's Milk
calories 150
protein(grams) 8
carbohydrate g. 11
fat g. 8
calcium mg. 291

Rice Dream (milk substitute)
calories 120
protein (grams) 1
carbohydrate g. 30
fat g. 2
calcium mg. 20

I supposed if you are allergic to milk and soy though, at least there is some alternative. Do any of you have these same allergies, and if so how do you compensate for the fat, calcium and protein in milk? I know how important the fat is for brain development, and the nurse said he should get enough in his meat. We eat chicken and lean ground beef! Do I need to start feeding him bacon everyday? They also said to continue feeding him cheese/yogurt for the calcium, but will continued exposure to the allergen lessen his chances of outgrowing it?

My daughter is pa/tna/sunflower, but my son wasn't tested for these today. One thing at a time. Thanks for any ideas. Meghan

[This message has been edited by mfharris (edited April 04, 2007).]

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 5:37am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Olive oil. Lots of it, in vegetables and everything else. It is a much better fat than the saturated variety found in dairy products anyway. We also use canola oil from Canada.
Yes-- we use rice milk. A lot of rice milk.
We also use Calcium fortified juices to pump up calcium.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 6:07am
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Joined: 02/02/2005 - 09:00

my 4 year old has been milk allergic since birth. i agree -- olive oil for good fat. if he is eating chicken and/or beef daily, he is probably getting adequate protein. for calcium, we use a powdered calcium supplement that i bake/cook into things like muffins, pancakes etc.
i don't really like the advice that they gave you about continuing to feed him dairy through cheese or yogurt. i don't think you'd want to continue to expose him to a known allergen. i would question the dr. on this thinking.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 6:50am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

my 2 youngest are allergic to milk and soy too. We use Rice Dream(at meals, in cereal etc..) and I still give my youngest(who just weaned, she is 15mths) Alimentum a couple times a day. The doc suggested putting Olive Oil in whatever I could...I haven't tried it yet though, they aren't big noodle fans at the moment. But my 3yr old is a big boy, no worry about fat with him, and my 15mt old, she's a petite thing...so I will try more). Good luck
EDIT, I didn't see the part about the cheese, I wouldn't do it, that's what is causing the rash and diarrhea, there are safer ways of getting a little fat into the diet. Skip the bacon as well, don't want to start clogging arteries this young! Calling a nutritionist would be a good call too...
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited April 04, 2007).]

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 7:50am
booandbrimom's picture
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Joined: 08/23/2000 - 09:00

Hey Meghan, you're not alone. My son is 12 now and very skinny! They pull the "alternate" weight chart out of the drawer for him at the allergist.
We saw a nutritionist at one point, which you might consider. I can't say it was terribly helpful but sometimes just talking with an expert can help you to feel better. Our son does take a vitamin supplement (including D, which is the hardest to get) and Tums for added calcium.
We add plain canola oil to "milk" shakes for added fat. We also do encourage fatty snacks. But unfortunately, for the most part, we haven't been able to influence his weight gain. Perhaps there's something else going on in the gut of these kids that makes it hard for them to absorb food.
Anyway, post if you have specific questions about recipes, ingredients, etc. I personally think the milk/soy combination is the most challenging, although the new labeling laws have helped with the whole "natural flavor" thing.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 9:09am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

You could try a hypoallergenic infant formula such as Alimentum or Nutramigen as a milk substitute. It would be highly nutritious.
There is also DariFree which is a powdered potato based milk substitute. It is fortified with calcium and vitamins, but I believe it is fat free. I don't think it has as much protein as milk or soymilk.
[url="http://www.vancesfoods.com/"]http://www.vancesfoods.com/[/url]
Eggs are also a good source of protein and fat.
If you are still breastfeeding, consider extended breastfeeding. I nursed both of my kids until they were 3 on the advice of the allergist.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 4 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.
[This message has been edited by Momcat (edited April 04, 2007).]

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 11:29am
Triciasmom's picture
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Joined: 08/03/2000 - 09:00

We do Rice Dream... the original enriched kind. It has a fair amount of calcium and vitamin D.... 30% and 25% RDA respectively.
We also use a lot of olive oil, corn tortillas, baked beans, refried beans, and brown rice.
I know that some people mash up avocado. But I don't know how allergenic that is.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 1:50pm
mfharris's picture
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Joined: 02/21/2007 - 09:00

Thanks for the suggestions. He had his first glass of Rice Dream tonight and seemed to really like it. Now for a dumb question - do you treat a milk/soy allergy like a peanut allergy - strict avoidance of all foods that may contain the allergen? Or just avoiding foods like cheese, ice cream, mayonaise...Does it matter what level (1-4) the allergen is at?
I have a lot of research to do, and a list of questions for the allergist tomorrow. Thanks again for your help.

Posted on: Wed, 04/04/2007 - 1:59pm
shoshana18's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by mfharris:
[b]Thanks for the suggestions. He had his first glass of Rice Dream tonight and seemed to really like it. Now for a dumb question - do you treat a milk/soy allergy like a peanut allergy - strict avoidance of all foods that may contain the allergen? Or just avoiding foods like cheese, ice cream, mayonaise...Does it matter what level (1-4) the allergen is at?
I have a lot of research to do, and a list of questions for the allergist tomorrow. Thanks again for your help.[/b]
we absolutely treat dd's milk allergy as seriously as her peanut/tree nut allergies...and when she was egg allergic, we treated that as seriously as well (and she outgrew it by 2!).
there has been a debate on these boards before about it, but i still contend that an allergy is an allergy...you don't know at what point a "mild" dairy allergy could turn into an anaphylactic allergy and why on earth would you want to roll the dice?

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 12:53am
booandbrimom's picture
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Joined: 08/23/2000 - 09:00

I'm always really puzzled when I read about people on this board who take milk less seriously than peanut. In a study of children who died or came close from allergies, milk was the second most common cause after peanut.
That said, there may be two pathways for milk allergy - one that is outgrown and one that is more persistent and serious. Children who can tolerate a little milk, or cooked milk, are probably in that first category. The fact that your allergist told you to continue giving milk-products to your child is puzzling to me - but perhaps this is what they're thinking.
Honestly, as with all the stuff you read on this board, I think you have to talk it over with your doctor. Test scores and levels are meaningless. My child is a "level 2" for milk, but reacts anaphylactically every time to even minute amounts.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 2:28am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by mfharris:
[b]Thanks for the suggestions. He had his first glass of Rice Dream tonight and seemed to really like it. Now for a dumb question - do you treat a milk/soy allergy like a peanut allergy - strict avoidance of all foods that may contain the allergen? Or just avoiding foods like cheese, ice cream, mayonaise...Does it matter what level (1-4) the allergen is at?
I have a lot of research to do, and a list of questions for the allergist tomorrow. Thanks again for your help.[/b]
I have learned from this site, to take ALL food allergies serious. For the minute you don't, is when it becomes a dangerous game of roulette. For my kids milk/soy allergies we avoid it ALL, nothing, not even in packaged foods. Read labels, milk and soy is EVERYWHERE. I do think(IMO) that you need to be so vary careful. At one time I used to peel the cheese off my sons pizza and let him eat the crust, then one gal here said this to me "would you wipe the peanut butter of your sons sandwich and give it to him to eat" HECK NO...so why was I so carelss??? We have gotten very diligent about all the foods my kids are allergic to. You just have to, I've read too many stories where the parents commented "I didn't know it could kill them". Know it possible can and act on it.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

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