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Posted on: Tue, 04/27/2004 - 2:41pm
Renee111064's picture
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Joined: 07/05/2001 - 09:00

to clarify some things :
freaked, freak

Posted on: Tue, 04/27/2004 - 5:03pm
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

Oh my - I have been so caught up in other issues in my life that I have been ignoring pa.com.
I always find it annoying when people think that the way kids act is a direct reflection on their parents. It is also annoying when posters come into a thread just to cause trouble, when there are people looking for support from others in similar situations.
As for my pa and tna nine year old dd: I am starting to wonder if she is going too far the other way. Today her class took a field trip to learn about native americans. The instructor gound up an acorn with a mortar and pestle and passed it around so the kids could taste it. My dd had already asked me if she could taste it and I had told her "no". Then, the instructor specifically announced that anyone who is allergic to nuts should not taste the acorn. Meanwhile, my dd was pleading with me to allow her to taste the acorn. Later, her teacher told me that she had discussed it with her before the field trip so that my dd would know not to taste the acorn. So, three adults have already told her not to taste the acorn and she was still pleading to do it. Maybe she was just testing, I don't know. She felt so left out that she couldn't taste the acorn. I wish she could just concentrate on the fact that staying safe is more important than getting to do everything all the other kids do.
On the other hand, she has been doing an excellent job of keeping herself safe and reaction free, so I probably don't need to worry too much.
Sorry for the long winded response that was (perhaps) a bit off topic.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]Miriam

Posted on: Tue, 04/27/2004 - 10:47pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Kim M:
[b] This is definitely true. We just had a discussion about how when we argue he is usually arguing about details, and I am usually arguing about process.
[/b]
Interesting. When my husband and I "argue", *I* go over the detail [b]and[/b] process side, while he just says: If you ask me, do it this way, it's simple. (Is that "process"?) Less talking, more doing." (I still stand back in awe of his problem solving ability).
He is definitely my "helpmeet" in that at times, I might be paralized by indecision if it were not for him.

Posted on: Tue, 04/27/2004 - 11:14pm
cyberguy's picture
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Joined: 04/25/2004 - 09:00

Renee,
I believe I already clarified myself.
I also believe that the quote feature is a very good idea. Too many people have been confused by what is being discussed. It then gets confusing when a person goes in and deletes or edits their post after the other poster has already discussed it.
Quoting someone helps preserve what they have already said.
By the way, I'm not on any side of the fence, I'm sitting above the fence. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 04/27/2004 - 11:43pm
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by California Mom:
[b]As for my pa and tna nine year old dd: I am starting to wonder if she is going too far the other way. Today her class took a field trip to learn about native americans. The instructor gound up an acorn with a mortar and pestle and passed it around so the kids could taste it. Then, the instructor specifically announced that anyone who is allergic to nuts should not taste the acorn. Meanwhile, my dd was pleading with me to allow her to taste the acorn. So, three adults have already told her not to taste the acorn and she was still pleading to do it.
[/b]
Hi Miriam,
Personally, this would concern me. As everyone knows, I do not worry much about my PA and am very relaxed and do have a loose comfort zone. I find PA very easy to manage. However, the fact that 3 adults stated that it was not safe to eat the ground up acorn, but she continued to plead to be allowed to eat it, would send up a warning signal to me that she is willing to take chances, and if you were not there sometime in the future, she might just eat something that she has been told was "unsafe". So maybe it's not a big concern, but still....... maybe she's been reaction-free so long she doesn't really think it will happen to her ..
Quote:Originally posted by California Mom:
[b]She felt so left out that she couldn't taste the acorn. I wish she could just concentrate on the fact that staying safe is more important than getting to do everything all the other kids do.[/b]
Let's allow a few years to pass.. if she was at a restaurant with friends for a birthday party and you were not there.. a cake was brought out and the waiter said "oh, sorry - the cake is not suitable for those with nut allergies".. but she didn't want to miss out, so she tried a piece of the cake anyway because she didn't see any nuts on it (but they were ground up in the crust???).
********************
Like you said, she's been reaction-free for a long time so you must be doing everything right. But I still would feel uncomfortable that she disregarded the statements from 3 adults that the product was not safe and insisted on trying it (if she takes risks when you are there, she could also do this when you are not there).

Posted on: Wed, 04/28/2004 - 3:12pm
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

Erik, I totally agree with you. My daughter is a risk taker who seems to always try to push the envelope. Not only do I have to worry about her becoming pregnant in high school, I probably have to worry about her eating something unsafe, too. Yesterday she also put up a fuss about taking her epi-pen to dance class. "What if someone opens my backpack and sees it?!" I thought we had finished with that nonsense by now. I made sure she took it.
At some point I do have to just pray that she gains some maturity and common sense, and loses some of her stubborness and foolish pride.
Meanwhile, I am just hangin on.
Thanks for your thoughts, I always appreciate hearing from you.
Miriam

Posted on: Wed, 04/28/2004 - 9:24pm
Scared Nutless's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2004 - 09:00

I'm just wondering how old your dd is? My dd is nine and we have been going through the same sort of problem. She didn't want to carry epi to dance or skating. But last week she had a severe reaction after being reaction free for a year or so(only hives occasionally) and ever since she is VERY careful. I don't even have to remind her to wear her epi-kit anymore. I guess it made her realize that it really can happen and that she needs to be prepared and to be more responsible. Its a shame though that it took such a bad reaction to make her see this.

Posted on: Thu, 04/29/2004 - 1:09pm
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

Scared Nutless, my dd is nine, too! I'm sorry I forgot to mention it in my post. I'm sorry to hear of your dd's serious reaction but I am glad that it helped her to behave more responsibly. I'm glad to know I'm not alone...
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]Miriam

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