Do You Think About PA Every Day?

Posted on: Thu, 09/28/2000 - 5:38pm
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Anonymous (not verified)

Do you think about PA every day, aside from your regular routine of checking labels, controlled environment, etc.? What are the triggers, aside from coming to this site, that make you think about it?
For me, to-day, I thought about it when I was away from home for 3 hours and came home to a phone message. I was afraid something had happened to Jesse while I was out. Then, in speaking with my mother-in-law tonight, she said she doesn't really worry about my kids as far as their allergies, asthma, etc., except for the PA so that was a discussion topic. When your child is with you and thereby implicitly "safe", do you think about it? I have to say that aside from reading the labels on all food and living in our controlled environment which we all consider "normal", I don't think about it as long as Jesse is with me because I consider him "safe". When he goes to school, which is 2 days one week and 3 the next, it's in the back of my head if the phone rings. I don't see him with PA stamped on his forehead, I don't notice his MedicAlert bracelet. I probably think about his asthma as much. What about anyone else?
Best wishes!

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 12:10am
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Cindy, I too think about PA everyday. It's been three weeks, since our son's allergy was confirmed. I'm a working Mom, and it's on my mind most of the day. I'm constantly coming to this site to learn more. Yesterday, I told my sitter that it was ok for her to feed my son spaghetti that she made. Eventhough she makes her own sauce and he has eaten it 100 times before his allergy was confirmed, I still called her at lunch time to make sure he was ok. Today, two of the other children walked in with baggies of Cocoa Puffs. Eventhough, my sitter has made her home peanut free, and I know that she provides the children all the food for lunch and snacks(except mine), my heart stopped. PA is always on my mind. I try to keep a sensible head about the whole thing, but sometimes it's hard. I feel that I am handling his pA well, but I've had nightmares of him having reactions. Two days after we found out about the PA, we took my son to a major league baseball game. I was terrified taking him, but we all survived, and we all had a good time. It may be wrong, but I always tell myself that if I could control the situation at the baseball game, I can keep my son safe everywhere else. So, Cindy, you are not alone. This web site is excellent in connecting people with the same worries and questions.

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 3:15am
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I will tell you that my mother never thought about my PA. We were always careful and avoided peanuts, etc. That is how we dealt with it. It is different now because peanuts seem to be everywhere. Also, noone ever told us how serious PA is. I do think about it everyday, but I do not worry about it every day. I regularly check this site and try to give my opinion when I think I can add something to a discussion, but PA is just something I have, always had and something I deal with without disrupting my life. Andy

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 3:39am
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Andy, I'm sorry I can't remember from your previous posts hold old you are, but do you think that it's a combination of the increase in PA and also information overload that has us parents the way we are rather than being like your mother? Also, that was an excellent distinction - do you think about your PA every day or do you WORRY about your PA every day. Thank-you. Best wishes!
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Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 3:50am
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Jonathan's Mom,
I just wanted to send you an encouraging word. It gets easier. You mentioned that your son was diagnosed just a few weeks ago. It is unlikely ever again to be as frightening and emotionally difficult as it is right now, since you're dealing with a new reality, and information overload. It will get easier for you as you live with it, and fewer things will set off those panic alarms. I am cautious and it's always in the back of my mind, but I really don't worry anymore, at least not nearly like I used to. It's been 3 years without a reaction and my son is 4 1/2 so he understands about his allergy at this point. Anyway, I just wanted to offer you some reassurance that how you're feeling right now won't last forever. Good luck.

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 4:38am
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Cindy--I think a lot of the worry has to do with information overload! My son was diagnosed with pa at 12 mos. and had an anaphylactic reaction at 18 mos. which is when we finally became better educated, saw an allergist, and got an epi-pen. I didn't find this site until he was 2 1/2. For the year after his ana reaction, I didn't worry too much, kept him away from peanuts, and he didn't have any reactions. I was extremely calm. I knew it could be a big deal (since I'd witnessed his anaphylactic reaction) but I didn't let it become a HUGE deal. Anyway, after I found this site I think I cried for 3 days. I couldn't believe all the things I had been letting him do and all the things I felt I had been doing wrong. But you know what? After I had time to calm down, I realized that I must've been doing something right because he hadn't had a reaction. It's just that after reading these posts it was just too much information all at once! Don't get me wrong, I love this website now and I really have learned so much from it. But now I pick and choose what to incorporate into the management of my son's peanut allergy rather than trying to do what everyone else was doing. But in response to your original question, I do think about pa everyday because I have to think about it every time my son eats something--but I don't worry about pa everyday. I only worry about it when he's away from me which is not very often. He just started preschool a few weeks ago so now I worry about pa on Tues and Thurs mornings from 9:00 to 11:30!!! Deanna

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 4:56am
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I have to admit, I think about it everyday and worry about it every minute. And, my daughter is nine! She only had one reaction at 13 months. Hives and swelling of the eyes. I think my biggest problem is thinking about the "what ifs". And, I am embarassed to tell you how much time I spend trying to figure out the statistics. I guess I am searching for a way to lessen the fear. This allergy is just so difficult to get a handle on. Most doctors don't have a clue...the general public doesn't have a clue...and most of us go back and forth from denial to terror. It just kills me that something so seemingly harmless can be so harmful to our kids. I can't tell you how many doctors have told me, "Just have her stay away from peanuts." Like this is no big deal! And, then, I go to this site and reality sets in. And the panic. And the fear. And then, I meet parents of other kids with peanut allergy and they are totally calm and normal. Of course, they have never been to this site! But, still, I feel better again after talking to the other parents. And then the rollercoaster begins again. Also, after reading these boards, I walk away feeling that my daughter's allergy is worse than everyone else's. Probably because her tests were so high. And then, I think, wow, these people are so worried and their kids don't even have such a severe allergy! So, basically, what I am trying to tell you is this...Before her diagnosis, I was a normal, happy go lucky wife and mother. Now, I am a neurotic basketcase. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Oh, well, that's me.

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 5:14am
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Tina,
I hope you were exaggerating when you said you think about this every minute. If that is the case, perhaps you may benefit from some sort of counseling to help you? I admit I am addicted to these boards but I am only on here when I am bored at work.
There are times I am very scared but most times I don't think about it.
A very well respeccted person in the PA field once told me NOT to visit these boards as they will just make you ultr paranoid. In your case maybe he is right. I must admit, sometimes the hysteria gets contagious.
Yes, its good to have the support but sometimes we need someone to say, "Hey, that is just not a realistic thing to think about" or "yes, there is a remote possibility that could happen (various cross contamination scenarious we dream up) but so is getting struck by lightening", etc.
Please try and get calm on this as our children definitely pick up on our moods. I want my child to be very concerned and responsible but I want her to be a confident happy child, not scared all the time, that is no kind of life to lead.

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 5:17am
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oh, and by the way, our pediatric allergist said it wasn't possible to score any higher than our daughter did on her RAST. But you know, he also said that its not a reliable indication on the severity of the reaction.
A person w/a high score could possible just get hives while someone with a very low score could go into full blown anaphylactic shock.
At least w/a high score you don't get complacent LOL

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 5:29am
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Thanks Sandra Y! Your kind words brought tears to my eyes. After I posted, I visited the "comfort zone" thread. It really made me feel better. Sometimes I worry that I don't worry enough. My son had his first and only reaction at about a year old. He's 20 mos. now, and his PA was just confirmed. For the last 8 months, we just "kept him away from peanuts," and he was fine. Something happens when a doctor prescribes an EpiPen for your child and makes sure you know how to use it. Your how outlook changes. Sometimes education brings fear. I'm glad to hear that it gets better. Thanks again Sandra Y.

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 5:55am
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I think about it every day, but now I only worry about it when I am not with her for an unusual reason...what I mean is, I am not with her when she is at daycare, but I am very comfortable with her situation there and don't worry about it any more...Only if she is going somewhere new or joining a new group etc. But when she was first diagnosed (and after the denial phase passed [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] ) I worried daily...so it HAS gotten better!

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 6:17am
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Tina, when I first found this board at the end of May and started reading different threads, I was totally freaked out. I labeled myself BAD MOMMY right away. It had to do with comfort zones and realizing that we, as PA parents, are as varied in our parenting as we are with other "issues". There were a few threads that really stuck out in my head - one was about whether you wipe the table down in restaurants, etc. One was about garbage in the playground and there was another one. But, I stepped back and realized that I have been living with this allergy for just over 3 years, my son has had 3 reactions (2 anaphylactic), he has not had a reaction for 1-1/2 years and I think what I'm doing is okay. I'm not criticizing the parent that feels they have to wipe down the table or worries about playground garbage because their comfort zone is different than mine. But, it did take some time for me to realize that and to settle down. As everyone well knows, I'm definitely addicted to this board, because of the friendships I have developed from this board, because of the caring and compassion I see on it and because of different interesting questions that are raised (someone in one thread suggested I had nothing better to do with my time [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] and I had to go into a long, of course, explanation of my insomnia, etc.). At any rate, for you, from how you sound, I would either stop visiting for awhile, although if you're like me you'll get right back on it again as soon as you can, or step back and realize that you have taken extremely good care of your child. You're doing good things and if reading this board makes you more upset, don't do it! I simply take everything with a grain of salt now and I also still get a lot of really good information. For example, this week I realized that in re-ordering Jesse's Epi-pens for my purse, he has two at school, but I had only requested one for home. I read something about it here and then phoned and requested two for home also. Do you know what I'm trying to say to you? If you feel a particular topic is something to freak out about then freak out, but not everything that is posted should warrant a freak out. I love your posts so I would hate for you to leave the board but I'm really concerned about your stress levels with regard to coming to the board. Anyway, if you want to e-mail me I'm at ( ) Maybe all of us who are posting alongside you could help get you calmed down a little. I must say that I am really worried but I also recognize some of what you're doing as what I did when I first started on the board. Can you remember what life was like before you found the site? You didn't think of PA as much aside from reading your food labels, etc. did you? But, on the upside, I would have to say, you may not have had support, caring and compassion in dealing with the PA either. It's a trade-off I guess. Again, I am concerned and if you feel like e-mailing me, please do. Please take care of yourself, know that you have taken VERY good care of your daughter and pat yourself on the back every night for that! Best wishes with much caring and concern, Cindy
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[This message has been edited by Cindy Spowart Cook (edited October 12, 2000).]

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 6:28am
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Anonymous (not verified)

The other thing is, I think the difficulty with dealing with this allergy is that it could mean the death of your child. I have a song that I sing with the kids when they go to bed and then I sing it again in their ears when I go to bed. It's by Robert Munsch. Here's the song: I will love you forever. I will like you always. As long as I'm living, my baby you'll be.
I sing it to Jesse (PA) and Ember every night when I go to bed. Sometimes I might say "as long as YOU'RE living instead of I'M living" by mistake and if I've said it when I'm singing it to Jess, you cannot imagine the horror that runs through me. That this beautiful little boy may die before me. But then, I think it has to do with information overload. What about my ex-family doctor, 75+ years old who never had the benefit of "peanut free" schools or proper food labeling? How did he suffer with his PA and manage to live this long? Do you know what I mean? It's the death thing that makes us different about this, although both my children have asthma and allergies. I know that they could die from their asthma also but I also know that they can't die as quickly. I'm closing now because I've just tried to calm someone else down and I've started it all up again for which I deeply apologize. Best wishes.
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Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 7:30am
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Hi Everyone - I was crushed by my daughter's diagnosis of PA. With Cayley it's just one thing after another, health-wise. Last July, after the diagnosis was confirmed I ran into an aquaintance at the grocery store. We had been pregnant together, with her son due in June and my daughter due in July. I was very depressed about the PA and when she asked me how things were going with Cayley, I told her, with tears in my eyes, how upset I was about my poor child. I asked how her son was doing - she hesitated, then told me he had been diagnosed with leukemia in May 2000.
I think sometimes we have to count the blessing we have. We know what our child's affliction is, so we can take steps to ensure their safety. The fatality rate is extremely rare. They can function normally everyday, going to school and playing with friends. For the most part, they feel fine and they're full of energy, as kids should be. My friend has been on a roller coaster of hope and despair. Watching her son go through this terrible time is tearing her apart, but she holds on to the hope that leukemia is over 80% survivable.
I guess what I'm trying to say, is I'd rather deal with the devil I know (PA) than the devil I don't (everything else that can go wrong in a child's life). I don't think about it all the time and I only worry about it if we're at a restaurant or exposed to peanuts in some way. I'm on the web a lot looking for research into a cure, and to familiarize myself with PA. It's like learning CPR. You hope you'll never need to use it, but you might save a life one day. The more you know about PA, the better armed you are for the war against PA ignorance. Take care. Carolyn

Posted on: Thu, 10/05/2000 - 7:39am
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Cindy,
I must admit, your last post had me in tears because that is the song I also sing to my 4 year old PA son every night - and he always asks me when I start to cry when I say it (mu husband thinks I am crazy)!. I now have a 5 month old son and I am very worried that he also will be PA.
I think about it every day, and now that my oldest is in JK, I have realized I no longer have control over everything in his life. What happens in the classrooms, the hallways and the washrooms is out of my control. I cannot be there to protect him when other kids tease him, and I can't be there to say no when people try to offer things to him. All I can do is pray that we have taught him well, and that God is with him. Yes, I think of it every day when he is in school (he goes twice a week and every other Friday). I am thankful I am still on maternity leave, so I can be there for him when he is at home. We have started looked for babysitters for when I go back to work in February, but am scared stiff at the thought of leaving him with someone that may not be able to care for his PA properly. I have not slept in months thinking about that. I was lucky the first time around since my sister watched him for me and I trusted her completely - but she is not willing to watch two extra kids (can't say that I blame her). Anyway, after all this, I only hope that things get better, because I seem to be losing it... I don't know my son handles it so well - but then he is only 4 years old!

Posted on: Thu, 10/05/2000 - 9:24am
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Batman, so there we are every night, probably about the same time singing the same song! It's a beautiful story, actually but very sad. Then, as I posted above, it really bothers me if I make a mistake with the words. I never do when we all sing it together but it's when I sing it into their ears when I'm off to bed that sometimes I do. I dunno. I'm having my 3 year old daughter tested for PA at the end of October. I needed to before she entered the school system. I'm not clear, and I may change my mind when I get the results, but I think I would be okay with it if she was PA because I know how to deal with that. Do you know what I mean? I don't wish it on her and certainly she'll never have peanut products while in my home with her brother anyway, but I think I would be okay with it.
Your son also has the same school schedule that mine has and it is very difficult, isn't it, when they're away. Best wishes to you and your family!
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Posted on: Thu, 10/05/2000 - 12:25pm
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Hi Cindy. I am 47. I have often wondered why my mother did not worry the way so many mothers these days worry. Each of you has much more information available to you then we had when I was growing up. We never even thought of things like cross contamination. Noone ever told us how serious PA is. I thought until 5 or 6 years ago all I had to do was vomit for a while and then I would be all right. I had no idea how bad it could be. My mother is not alive, but I know she had no idea either. Also, I think peanuts and peanut oil are in more things now. By way, we knew my PA was bad, but we did not know that it could lead to anything more then vomiting. It is hard to guess, if there was such a thing as peanut allegy.com when I was growing up and my mother saw it, we probably would have been much more protective. Andy

Posted on: Thu, 10/05/2000 - 3:15pm
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Andy, see, that's where I'm trying to figure things out - aside from the support etc. that we receive from this site, would we have been so PA obsessed if not for information overload? I'm not saying that it isn't good to be educated about the allergy etc. but some of us are on here freaking out about everything and I would suggest that that leads to a less than "normal" life. You're 47, it wasn't as though your Mother was careless or uncaring, the information was just not there. Also, I guess PA wasn't as prevalent, and, as you said, peanuts and peanut oil weren't in as many things. I'm just wondering if there is some sort of balance that we can achieve. Do you know what I mean? As you said in your other post, you THINK about PA every day but you don't WORRY about it every day and I think a lot of us WORRY about it everyday when we shouldn't be. When you're reading the posts and see the restrictions we place on ourselves and our children and what we are comfortable with, is it a lot different than when you grew up or are we just kidding ourselves that we're leading "normal" lives with this allergy? I really like your input because of your age and insight and it also gives parents on the board a lot of hope because I think in the back of our heads we're really afraid that we're going to lose our child to this despite whatever measures we put in place.
Best wishes!
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Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 12:12am
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Cindy, my son has had food allergies for almost 6 years, and my fear level has changed many times during those years. Initially, we were appropriately cautious, but we certainly didn't limit the things our son did. Our attitude was that we could take some calculated risks because we believed medications could handle reactions.
In the last year, my son's reactions have grown more severe and I no longer have the luxury of relying on medications in the same way, so my behaviors have changed some and I'm back to the "education" stage. However many hoops I jump through though, I try very hard not to let my emotions impact my son's life. This means that my husband and I have had to renegotiate some of the things causing me stress (e.g. leaving medicines on a play date). However, there's very little that my son cannot do with some forethought and planning.
There are 2 parts to not thinking about this every day. When your safety measures and emergency plans are clear, your stress level decreases. This means gathering all the information you can, particularly from your doctor, and then sitting down with your husband and writing out how you're going to manage this allergy. When you put it on paper, it can really point out to you where decisions are reasonable and where they are irrational. Will you allow playdates? Will you try for a peanut-free school? etc. Getting a plan you both agree with can take time and negotiation, but it's worth it. If it's feasible and you have areas of disagreement, ask your doctor. If this isn't possible, you may need to get a counselor or other objective adult involved.
Once you feel like you have a handle on the things you need to do to balance safety and normalcy, I highly recommend that you STOP reading about this stuff. It sets up a never-ending cycle of stress/emotional rumination. Once you've done everything you can, what's the point of dwelling on it?
Another important part of the journey is to put the fear and risk in perspective. 3,000,000 people in this country have PA.
Very few people die from this condition. Could your child be one? Sure. But the risks of your child dying from so many other things are so much greater, and yet we don't obsess over those things every minute of the day. If you were afraid of heights or flying, you'd be able to recognize the irrational nature of the fear and take measures to deal with it. But, when it's our children, we feel that we have to try to keep them totally safe at all costs and that no fear is irrational. The thing is, this attitude has a cost. Our children pick up on our anxiety and, frankly, rebel all the more against it when they hit the teenage years. This is the real danger - most of the people dying from allergies are teens who ignore their symptoms because they're tired of being different. The more restrictive the environment, the more complete the rebellion.
As Andy said, there's a huge difference between thinking about this and worrying about it every day. Don't let this take over your life.

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 12:17am
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Hi Cindy, up until today I would have said that I do think of Wade's PA every day, but I don't think I am consumed with worry. I tend to worry more if he is not with me ie: at pre-school. However, last night I had an awful nightmare. In the dream Wade ate something which contained peanut because I had neglected to read the label, a terrible reaction followed and I tried to administer the epi only to have it malfunction...I tried the next pen...same thing, and again and again. I then tried to call 911 but the phones were dead. God help me it was the worst dream I have ever had...I woke up in a cold sweat and crept into Wade's room (it was the middle of the night) and got in to bed with him, held him in my arms and put my hand on his chest so that I could feel him breathe. Even this morning I am still upset. I guess it goes to show that I do worry alot about this #%^* allergy so much so my subconscious gave me a wake up call. We are all trying to keep our kids safe (all our kids not just our PA kids) it's just more complicated to keep our PA children safe. As for putting it in to perspective, I completely agree. We had an awful scare with Wade last year. He had been quite ill and was hospitalized. His platelet count came back all messed up and they believed he had leukemia, I lived 24 hours of shear terror and at the time all I could think of was please god...I can handle the PA if that's all he has we wiould be grateful. As it turned out we were very fortunate in that Wade did not have leukemia, only a bad virus and anemia. So I guess what I am saying is I keep telling myself when I am haveing a bad day is it could be so much worse..I'll take the devil I know anyday!
Take care all!
Katiee (Wade's mom)

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 12:41am
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Katiee, I know what bad dreams can be like. I'm fortunate that I haven't had any re Jesse's PA, I have other disturbing ones. I actually have to get out of bed, come downstairs, have a cigarette and break the cycle of my sleep completely to get rid of the bad feeling. But it's not like anything you experienced last night. I hope you're okay. Also, when I posing questions, I think a lot of people think, which is natural, that I'm posting them for myself, but they're just general questions and I'm trying to explore the answers for. Do you know what I mean? For example, I don't really think about PA every day except for coming to this board. I worry about PA when Jesse isn't with me. I have a good system in place at school for him and that's what I was asking Andy, am I fooling myself when I think that we lead a "normal" life. But, I really think that we do. We have his medication, we are well educated on the allergy, and as I've said so many times, when I look at Jesse, I don't see PA stamped across his head - I see my beautiful, sensitive, outgoing little guy with now 2 teeth missing! Do you know what I mean? When I ask questions I'm not just trying to sort it out for myself, but hoping that it may help someone sort out the same thing, etc. So, Booandbrimom, don't be concerned about me. I am okay. I do have questions but I'm not consumed with worry, dread and other negative things. Jesse does not know when I am having a minor or major freak-out with something to do with his PA. I'm by all outward appearances extremely calm. Even when presented with our worse experience so far, the circus (and I'm learned how to be safe there too since posting here), Jesse wouldn't have known that I was freaked. Do you know what I mean?
I guess I simply like to question and see what other people are thinking and doing re the PA. Does that make sense? I also believe that Andy, when he posted, actually posted a better question - DO YOU WORRY ABOUT PA EVERY DAY? To answer that - no.
Best wishes!
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[This message has been edited by Cindy Spowart Cook (edited October 06, 2000).]

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 1:06am
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I have tried not to think about PA as much lately. And, I have to tell you, my days have been quite a bit happier. Less anxiety. But, then, last night at 2:15 in the morning, I woke up and had a panic attack. I guess, in the middle of the night everything seems worse. Well, I laid there and cried. My husband must have thought I was nuts...pardon the expression. So much for the theory of trying not to think about it! lol

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 1:36am
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Tina,
I really think its a good idea for you NOT to visit here for a while. You need a break and to get your mind on other things. If you read too much of this stuff and take it all to heart you will drive yourself batty!
There is a thin line between over protection and obsessive compulsion, sometimes we all walk that line, you just don't want to get stuck on the obsessive side!
But you know, part of it is also just being a mom I think. I find myself getting up with a start at 2 am and thinking all sorts of stuff, like "oh no, my daughter is gonna be too short to reach her cubby hook for her coat, how will she manage!" to much more serious worries. Each manages to keep me up however, its the start of a lifetime of worries I fear, just don't let it eat you up! There is gonna be a lot more in store for us with our children, rest up!

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 2:45am
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Mom2Two,
In reality, every person who has visited this website on a regular basis is somewhat worried and concerned on a regular basis! Just look at the number of posts everyone has! (Including you, lol!) So, no matter what people say about not being overly worried, the fact is, they are here and they are worried. Those who are not worried don't search out websites like this one. So, to answer your original question, Cindy...Those who visit this site daily do think about it daily!

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 3:23am
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Tina,
sorry to have offended you. Your original post stated that you thought and worried about this every minute of the day. I do not.
Of course we all worry about this. We all think about it during the day by posting here
but that doesn't mean we all worry about "every minute of the day".
I actually thought you were looking for advice and support. I guess you are just looking for someone to tell you its okay to obsess on this and be worried all the time.
and as to the number of posts I or anyone else has, I find your comment offensive for some reason, not sure why, must be the tone I picked up. I know its hard to read other people's messages and know their intent but I find yours somewhat sarcastic and insulting. You seem to be unable to differentiate between interest, concern, worry and obsessiveness, paranoia and anxiety.
BUt you know, this web site actually angers me more often than not, getting annoyed at people "finding" peanut "threats" everywehre they look so I think I will take my own advice and skeedaddle, I tried to post to give support to other newly diagnosed people who are freaking out like I was in the beginning but obvioulsy that is not what you wanted, nor what most people here seem to want anymore.
so long all, try not to obsess and live your lives and let your kids live theirs!
thanks tina, you actually made me do something I should have done a long time ago,

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 3:35am
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I wasn't offended at all! I was just responding to your post, and I am so sorry if I offended you. In fact, I can't imagine how you would have been angered with what I wrote. I didn't say that you were obsessive or need help, I just said that you must think about it everyday or you wouldn't post all the time. Well, sorry you're leaving. We'll miss you!

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 3:51am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Mom2mom, I'd like you to reconsider leaving the board but it may be too late unless I'm actually able to contact you by e-mail. Please remember that it is not only one person you are affecting by leaving the board but all of us who read your posts which are always caring, compassionate, concerned and informative. The thing is also though, I don't want to get in the middle of the thing between you and TinaH. I know that I have had similar things happen on this board where I've had to step back and settle down because I've completely misinterpreted someone's post and feel hurt, etc. Now, [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] given the fact that I am probably the person posting right now with the absolute most number of posts, I have to disagree with whether posting = obsessing. As I explained when I was personally attacked on this board for my # of posts before, I'm an extremely fast typist so my posts can be quite lengthy and also quite frequent compared to those who do not type as fast as I am. I'm also really into questioning the PA and how other people deal with it, but as I've stated above, and in the original post to start this thread, I often don't think about PA except for being on the board. Does that not make sense to anyone? I know that there is this website that I can come to and what I've been doing of late is going in to see what the topics of the day are and then if I think I have 2 cents to add to a topic, well, there's my 2 cents added. I think, for me, I'm trying to be helpful and in return, I definitely ask for help if I need it. But, and I'm not sure if I'm wording it properly or not, unless I'm posting on this board, I'm tending NOT to be thinking about my son's PA unless there is a situation that presents itself to me in which I must deal with it. Is that clear? TinaH., you had mentioned that you woke up last night with a panic attack. Was your panic attack about your child's PA? Last night, my concern with Jesse was his coughing and whether I should give him some extra asthma puffers when I went to bed at 1:00 a.m., which I did. Night time is always worse for me if my kids are sick because it seems like they get sicker at night and then night time is when you actually have quiet time to think. I've already posted a response to your original post on this thread and if coming to the board does freak you out and worry more, don't come to it Tina. See, it doesn't freak me out. Check out the response I got from BooandBriMom on this thread. This person was really concerned about me and my visiting the board and I can understand why. But please also see what I posted in reply to her. The whole thing I do with the board now is talk to other parents re PA, get a lot of support and caring and information, try to help other people dealing with it and I guess just tick people off constantly by continuing to question how we're all dealing with this. Me, I think I'm dealing with it fine. I hope you two can sort this out so that neither one of you leaves the board because of what is probably a misunderstanding or misinterpretation in words. Do you know what I mean? I have almost left a couple of times and then the one time I was forced to leave, but I feel the positive aspects of the board far outweigh the bad. If someone has posted something they're concerned about and I'm not concerned about it, I may read their post, but I don't question my own comfort zone anymore because of it. When I first started out here, I was questioning how I was dealing with Jesse's PA because of other people's posts and I recognized it's the comfort zone thing and as BooandBriMom has posted above, as long as you have the two plans in place then you're okay. I have them in place and I believe Jesse will be okay. Anyway, enough. Best wishes all, and please, neither one of you leave!
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Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 3:54am
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I hope you're not really gone mom2two - this board is a support board - some people GIVE support and some people NEED support. Lately I've been feeling better about the PA, I feel we can handle it and the shock of the original diagnosis has worn off. I've been in GIVING support mode lately, so much so that I have decided to stop posting for a while - before someone says SHADDUP!
Don't leave and remember that everyone on this board has a life apart from PA - it's just that this is a PA site - so if you start talking about other aspects of your life, people tend to remind you to stay on track! Please don't take offense to my post, as I'm writing it I know how I'm feeling and what I'm saying - but do you? I wish I knew how to add little happy faces to my posts but I don't!
Thank you for all your input on this board, don't forget to check in once in a while to say hello! Take the best care... Carolyn
(insert smiley face here).

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 4:09am
andy's picture
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Cindy, I did not have any restrictions on me when I was growing up other then I could not eat peanuts or peanut butter. That was not a problem because I hated the smell anyway. To be honest I ate at a Chinese restaurant yesterday that I have eaten at many times before and enjoyed myself. Could there be cross contamination? Sure, but that did not stop me from having a nice lunch with my wife at a restaurant that we enjoy. My parents and I never even thought of the restrictions that I read about here. The funny thing is we thought we were being careful. No letters went out to other parents and my parents never talked to any other parents about my PA. As long as I can remember I knew that I had to stay away from peanuts and peanut butter and I did. I am not in any way saying that the restricions are bad. I am just telling you how I grew up. You have to understand. You know what can happen. Absolutely noone told us how bad this could be. I do not know why, but even our doctor never said how serious this is. Andy

Posted on: Fri, 10/06/2000 - 4:31am
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Joined: 06/18/2000 - 09:00

Hi everyone! I beleive I must think about PA everday. I seem to be a bit addicted to this site right now...not because I'm constantly worrying about food allergies but because I think it is educational, interesting, and even provides a little guidance in the area of not taking what other people say too seriously, or not reading into what people may or may not have meant. I think most of us mean well even though we may not be able to express ourselves the way we intended. Who knows, maybe right now someone is reading this and thinking negative things about what I am writing or about me even! I hope not because if you know me (and I don't mean just through computer messages) I would never want anyone to be upset with me even though sometimes I might say or do things that upset people. Unfortunately, we're all imperfect!!!(well maybe not me! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img])
Anyway, back to the subject...I do learn helpful things I might not of thought of by reading these posts. I also think reading these posts make me worry about things that maybe I shouldn't (of course subject to opinion). Overall, I think I just like reading this stuff. Of course sometimes we do need a break from it!
If anyone is thinking that I am directing any certain thought or comment towards them I am NOT!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Just take it in stride and move on!!! That's what I do! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] (for emphasis)
tkiaml

Posted on: Sat, 10/07/2000 - 7:27am
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Joined: 06/01/1999 - 09:00

Do I think about the PA every day?... Yes, I do. And I confess that some days it overwhelms me, and some nights keeps me awake. Do I think that's bad? No. I think it's just part of the territory - the "emotional rollercoaster" as someone once posted here.
I have a story about the night waking (I'll try to keep it short). I recently considered going back to work, tempted solely by $$$$$. My MIL has moved in with us, so the opportunity looked perfect. I was VERY close to accepting the job, then I started losing sleep over it. In the middle of the night I'd wake up and know without a doubt that taking the job was a mistake. In the light of day, however, I'd question it. I finally concluded that in the middle of the night my HEART was talking to me without interference from my head ($). I declined the job, and am sleeping much better!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] My son's PA had a lot to do with it, I admit. I think about it every day, but every day is in a different way. Maybe he'll cough while he's eating - I think immediately "reaction???" Maybe I'll be in the store and walk past a food with peanuts in it. Maybe I'll see a commercial or show on TV. The little thoughts come up daily, but the consuming thoughts are off and on. And I view them as a way to keep me on my toes - ready for just about anything. I fear anyone who doesn't fear PA at least a little bit. "Comfortable" makes me nervous. Maybe it will lessen as my son gets older and becomes more in charge of himself and his PA - he's almost 4.
As for people leaving the boards, I wish no one would leave. We all need each other for support and for education. Everyone has different experiences with PA and sharing them helps all of us in some way. I enjoy the boards, and find the information shared here to be priceless!! I hope everyone will stay! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 10/07/2000 - 8:11am
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Cindy I have been getting on this web site because,I find it very comforting. Sometimes when I am feeling down I like to just get on it to talk to someone with the same problems as myself. As you know my son is 14 and PA. I am sure that in the back of my mind I worry alot more than I probably should. We are very fortunate people because anyone that he would be going anywhere with has always been very good at the peanut allergy requirments we have. I have a very close family and there homes are peanut free. He will not go to most restaurants because of the worry of a mistake in the kitchen. That bothers me because I feel so bad for him if he is nervous that we may be going somewhere he feels unsafe. We walked past a peanut store in cape cod one time and he started reacting to the smell. I still feel that we probably worry about each child in a different way. My 2 year old has 4 stitches from a dog bite, so now I worry about the fact that he is so frightened by being near a dog. My daughter is allergic to cats,so naturally I worry when she is around a cat. I hope you understan what I am trying to say. If we didn't worry to some degree about things that are abnormal we would not be normal people. My kids of course don't know all the fears I have at certain times but YES they are there. What is good for one parent is not always good for another. I am teaching Church School class. On the list I have an allergic child. I called the mother because I wanted her to realize that we have this in common,and her child will be safe. She said that they are very comfortable and not to worry. They allow there child to eat different foods than my son can eat. He does not get dunkin donuts but their child does. You see what I mean. WE are all different and that is how it is supposed to be. Good luck to you. Claire

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2000 - 1:32am
Mom of Wonderful PA boy's picture
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Cayleys' Mom,
Now that puts a bit of clarity to the situation. We have healthy children, with an allergy. If we watch over our kids and teach them well then we can hope for the best. Terminal illness such as Cancer is a whole different ball park. There is little hope for many Ca sufferers... and it is such a painful journey.
I am new to this website. My PA son is 5 years old and in kindergarten. I do fear him being out of my care somewhat but I am doing what I can to ensure the school staff are well informed about pa. My sons allergy is a 4+....so it is as high as it gets.
We were rather bothered by the alleryg when it was diagnosed to that degree (last year...prior to that we were told it was a mild allergy as a result of a rast test when he was under the age of 1.) My oldest son took the news of the anaphylactic allergy much worse than any...he was just turning 8 when we found out and he is a fussy eater one of those who would "only eat" peanut butter sandwiches. Well he had to change and accept it. He wished his brother gone when he first found out...would at that point rather keep peanut butter and be rid of his brother...but that has turned around. I do let him have an occasional PB sandwich and it is a real treat (my husband and I also find it a real treet due to the rareness of it here). He has it outside or in the laundry room so it is away from the one with the allergy. (careful washing follows and dishes used are rinsed in HOT water then put in the dishwasher and a hot cycle is used when we do dishes.
Well...my point is...I would rather know that my boy has this allergy than leukemia or some other terminal illness. This is not debilitating...really...I am a nurse and work with real ill children.
TEACH, LEARN, WATCH (for dangerous situations, for allergic reactions) and enjoy the lovely child or your wonderful self...who ever has the allergy.
------------------
Take Care.
:o) Maryanne

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2000 - 3:55am
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I just don't think about PA everyday , it's every second of my life. My daughter is a PA child and outside of my protective arms har life is in harms way every second.

Posted on: Sun, 10/08/2000 - 3:59am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Mom of Wonderful PA Boy and Fed Up! - welcome to the board! Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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[This message has been edited by Cindy Spowart Cook (edited October 08, 2000).]

Posted on: Tue, 10/10/2000 - 2:19pm
andy's picture
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I was with my father last night and showed him this site. I asked him why he thought my doctor never told us how serious PA is. He said he did not think my doctor knew. That is amazing, but probably true. As a result my parents never knew how serious this was and never thought to take the precautions that so many parents take today. In a sense because they did not know they were spared much worry. Andy

Posted on: Tue, 10/10/2000 - 2:42pm
California Mom's picture
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I am jumping in rather belatedly to say that yes indeed, I do think about pa every day. Sometimes I am able to take it in stride, and feel that my daughter (age 5 3/4) will be safe, because we are careful. Other times, especially in the middle of the night, I become anxious and worry about things in the future: like sleep away camp, world travel, and dating. A comment for Tina H: I know I shouldn't get in the middle of this, but I want to say that I am impressed with your mental health! It seems to me that you were slammed for posting a very nice and totally non-offensive post, and you handled it quite well. And this, by the way, happened after you had been recommended for psychological help! Many would have not taken that so well. We all worry about our children: some of us perhaps feel safer than others to admit the level of fear or anxiety that overtakes us at times. That's my take on the situation, anyway. It took me a while to read this thread, because when I saw the title my reaction was "of course I do!". Finally I decided to see what others have said, and I find it quite interesting. I do check these boards almost every day - I don't get to post every day because I am often nursing my baby while reading, and I can't type so easily at those times. Another thought: I actually wish that peanuts were my daughter's only allergy: she is also allergic to tree nuts and sesame seeds. That makes even more foods off limits, and makes restaurant ordering (and everything else) that much more complicated. It also just seems like a heavier load for her to bear.

Posted on: Tue, 10/10/2000 - 3:47pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Andy, I may be totally wrong, but I think not knowing the severity of your PA saved your parents from a lot of unnecessary worry and allowed them and you to lead a regular life without PA constantly out there. I may be mistaken, but that's what I'm really trying to figure out with your input on this thread. What did your Father think of the site? Did he think we were all overprotective, etc., or did he say, "Oh my God" and realize what may have happened to you, that he may have lost you? I'm also not suggesting that now, with the information we have available that we shouldn't take advantage of it to educate ourselves, as parents, and others that we trust our child with, and to empower our children, but I think we should step back and examine how much of the information we really need in our lives. I'm not sure if that is clear or not. It's wonderful now to be able to go and get information to help educate my son's school, ignorant people, etc., but this also has to be balanced out by not freaking out over every little thing. I'm really pleased with your very positive input! Best wishes!
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Posted on: Tue, 10/10/2000 - 11:36pm
Gwen Thornberry's picture
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Joined: 10/14/1999 - 09:00

Hi all
It

Posted on: Tue, 10/10/2000 - 11:45pm
Tina H.'s picture
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Joined: 10/13/1999 - 09:00

California Mom,
Thanks so much for your kind words of support. I guess I didn't let it bother me too much because I feel secure knowing that I am a great mom (as we all are) and I am doing whatever I can to keep my daughter safe. Sure, I worry a lot, but I believe that we need to be somewhat fearful in order to keep our kids out of harms way. Think about this for a sec...The question that was originally posted was: "Do you think about peanut allergy every day?" Well, what would happen if we forgot about it for a day? Or for a minute, if that happened to be the minute when we were shopping for food or feeding our kids? We HAVE to think about it everyday. It is unfortunate, but it is true. It is our responsibility. So, I am not going to let some woman who thinks I need help change the way I take care of my children. (And, there are times when I probably do need help [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img], but I get through those times and wake up the next morning with a smile.) I really do believe that our kids are going to be ok because we are informed and we are teaching them how to live with this allergy. Those who's parents don't think about it everyday are in greater danger. Well, that's how I feel. And again, I want to say thank you for being so nice and supportive. We need eachother. Only we understand what we are going through. Love ya!

Posted on: Tue, 10/10/2000 - 11:47pm
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California Mom,
Thanks so much for your kind words of support. I guess I didn't let it bother me too much because I feel secure knowing that I am a great mom (as we all are) and I am doing whatever I can to keep my daughter safe. Sure, I worry a lot, but I believe that we need to be somewhat fearful in order to keep our kids out of harms way. Think about this for a sec...The question that was originally posted was: "Do you think about peanut allergy every day?" Well, what would happen if we forgot about it for a day? Or for a minute, if that happened to be the minute when we were shopping for food or feeding our kids? We HAVE to think about it everyday. It is unfortunate, but it is true. It is our responsibility. So, I am not going to let some woman who thinks I need help change the way I take care of my children. (And, there are times when I probably do need help [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img], but I get through those times and wake up the next morning with a smile.) I really do believe that our kids are going to be ok because we are informed and we are teaching them how to live with this allergy. Those who's parents don't think about it everyday are in greater danger. Well, that's how I feel. And again, I want to say thank you for being so nice and supportive. We need eachother. Only we understand what we are going through. Love ya!

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 3:09am
andy's picture
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My father said people cannot live their life in fear. He said there is no way to absolutely protect someone from getting near peanut butter. He has no thoughts that something terrible could have happened to me and we were just lucky that it did not. He thinks we handled it right with a good balance between protection and living a normal life. I got the impression that even with all the additional information he would not have raised me any other way. I know you are searching for an absolute answer Cindy but, I do not have one. I do know that the only way I have changed my life personally since visiting this site is I now carry an epi-pen, which before I never heard of. For the last 5 years I had an ana kit, but I often did not carry it with me. I try my best to never be without my epi-pen. That is really the only way educatuon has changed my life. Andy

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 3:21am
andy's picture
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My father said a person cannot live their life in fear. He did not have any thoughts that he could have lost me and he should have been more protective. I do not get the impression that he would have raised me any other way even with all the information that is now available. The only way I have changed my life knowing what I know now is I carry my epi pen with me. Before I found this site, I never heard of an epi pen. I had an ana kit for the last 5 years, but I often did not carry it with me. Andy

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 4:25am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Andy, no, I'm not looking for an absolute answer really. I think I'm trying to get myself and other PA parents to step back and read your posts and realize that your parents were not running on information overload as a lot of us are and that we can lighten up a bit WITHOUT endangering our children's lives. I think as BooandBriMom posted, as long as you have your action plan in place in case of an emergency and as long as you try to not have your child exposed to peanut products, you have the 2 most important things in place and then why go overboard with worry, etc. about it? I'd simply like people to read your posts and step back and realize that you're 47 years old and you're okay! If you feel comfortable answering, how many anaphylactic reactions have you had to peanut products? Some people seem to be fraught with worry each and every day of their/their child's lives and I'd really like them to read your posts and not be so freaked out! I don't mean to appear as though I'm picking your brain for an absolute answer, I'm simply thinking that perhaps the way you were raised was a lot better than how we're raising our children with so many restrictions. This also depends on the comfort zone of the parents and how many restrictions the children have placed on them. So, no, of course not, there is no absolute answer. I'd like us all to step back and read your posts and maybe lighten up a little and not worry. Make sense? Thanks so much for answering these direct posts to you! Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 4:57am
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Hi Cindy,
I also think about my daughters allergy all the time. Sometimes I feel obsessed. It is so scary. The day she had her reaction she was 14 months old. It all happened so slowly. I gave her a peanut butter cookie and she had a few bites. I noticed the hives around her mouth and being a volunteer EMT on our local rescue squad called our ambulance direct line. I didn't get an answer so I called the police station to see if they were out on a call, and they said no and asked why. I told them I thought my daughter might be having a reaction and they asked if they could tone it. I said no and tried the station again. I still didn't get an answer. At this time my daughters lips started turning blue. I called the police station and had the call toned. By the time the ambulance came she had thrown up and was getting her color back, but her body was covered in hives. We went to the hospital and they gave her Benadryl and it worked. When we got her tested she tested at a 4+. We now have the epi pen jr. The allergist said she must have worked her way through it, but it sounded like the allergy made her throat close of by swelling, because she never had any wheezes. It has been 4 months and I feel so guilty now that I know how serious this could have been. I have two other children and never thought this could happen to my family. My school still has days where lunch is soup and a peanut butter sandwich (luckily I have 4 years until I have to deal with that) Am I over reacting on this PA or what? I am lucky to have a great mother in law that wants information on this allergy so she can be informed. I only wish my other relatives felt the same way. Is this fair of me to think everyone should be as concerned with this as I am? I am glad I can be home with her. I don't know what I would do if she wasn't with me most of the time, but still it is stressful. She is my last child, my baby and I just want her to be safe.
[This message has been edited by Stacy (edited October 13, 2000).]

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 5:20am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Stacy, I wouldn't be too hard on your husband or maybe you should be before he has to learn the hard way, I'm not sure. I'll tell you what happened with me. When my son had his 1st reaction, which wasn't anaphylactic, my husband saw it. Even after we were told that Jesse was PA and prescribed an Epi-pen Jr., my husband still didn't get it. When Jesse had his 2nd reaction which was anaphylactic, my husband did not see it and he was not living with us at the time. He only heard about it, probably days later, on the telephone. Well, when Jesse went into anaphylactic shock the 2nd time (his 3rd reaction), my husband was in complete denial. I knew the moment that the rice krispie square with pb in it touched his lips (it did not enter his mouth, it did not have a bite mark it in, it MERELY touched his lips) that he was "going". His lips immediately started to swell and turn blue. I started to freak out immediately. Well, for whatever reason, and I feel terribly guilty about this even to-day, I listened to my husband rather than trusting my instincts, pulling the bloody Epi-pen out and giving it to my son then and there. He was completely swollen facially, his whole body was red. He vomited (too much candy, says Dad). He was coughing (too much running around, exercise induced asthma says Dad). I don't know exactly what happened before I could convince this man that his son needed the bloody shot! Do you realize I could have lost my son? Does he realize he could have lost his son? I know he was in denial about Jesse's PA but I keep wondering what the hell my problem was! He did apologize to me when I called from the hospital when he was with our daughter at home, but, he still wasn't there in the emergency room with Jesse praying that he would not die! I do think that after seeing his son in anaphylactic shock, the man finally did get it though. I'm not clear if there are any videos out there showing a reaction, but I really feel that for people, especially parents that don't get it, that this would be a must. By husband did not get it until my son experienced one and God forbid that each of our children has to experience what my son did in order for their father to "get it"! Damn them! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/mad.gif[/img] (and you know who I'm even madder at!) I think you'll probably find some way to sort this out with your husband, especially since you have the internet and connection to so much information. We didn't have it at the time, which isn't that long ago. Best wishes! I'm sure you and your child will be fine! And, your husband too - he just has to get it and hopefully it doesn't take your child suffering for him to get it. My child almost died before my husband got it (and, ultimately, who is to blame there but me - I should have trusted my instincts and given Jesse the Epi-pen right away) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
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[This message has been edited by Cindy Spowart Cook (edited October 11, 2000).]

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 6:30am
andy's picture
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My father said people cannot live in fear. He said it is impossible to completely make sure peanut butter is never around. He is comfortable with the way I was brought up and I do not get the impression that even with the knowledge he has now he would raise me any differently. He is comfortable that we took all the necesssary precautions. The only way knowledge has changed my life is I now carry an epi pen. Until I found this site, I never heard of one. For the last 5 years I carried an ana kit, but I did not always have it with me. Andy

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 6:43am
andy's picture
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Joined: 04/26/2001 - 09:00

Hi Cindy. I am sorry I answered more then once last time. I did not realize that it went through and I replied more then once by mistake. In answer to your question, I have had 10 or 11 reactions in my life. Each time it has been severe vomiting and wheezing and extreme difficulty in breathing. It is almost as if I do not have the strength to breathe. The last one I had was 5 or 6 years ago. I do not remember how old I was when I had my first attack. Andy

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 6:49am
andy's picture
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Joined: 04/26/2001 - 09:00

Perhaps Chris or someone can eliminate my extra posts. Thanks. Andy

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 7:03am
Mom of Wonderful PA boy's picture
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Joined: 10/08/2000 - 09:00

Hello again,
I am not a frequent poster (yet!!...too busy with other websites, email, reading, family life and work)...but I have been reading some of the posts in this website, all of them in this thread. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] I think of my sons allergy every day, it is a part of him that needs to be thought of, but I do not obsess.
I have been thinking more of it lately with him at school 5 (half days) per week. I keep close contact with the teacher and aid to ensure that things are well understood...I am learning more about peanut allergies by reading stuff here and elsewhere. I am more comfortable with feeding him now though than prior to the last year. He had more food allergies (eggs, milk, and wheat)...but they have decreased and he has a bigger selection of foods...the peanuts are in a whack of foods but having the wheat has made a big difference...pastas, breads that were so limited before. (Do you know how gross rice bread is, corn pastas...they don't cook the same!) He is a skinny little lad, but due to his early restrictions in his diet he appreciates food more than his "normal" brothers.
Thanks to other threads in this website I have ordered a medic alert bracelet for him, he has seen the [url="http://www.nonutsforme.com"]http://www.nonutsforme.com[/url] website and animated story...I have passed this on to the school...my hope is that all of the kids see it...great childrens education! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Well, maybe it would be in everyone else's best interest if I posted more frequently and shorter! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Bye for now...
Maryanne
------------------
Take Care.
:o) Maryanne

Posted on: Wed, 10/11/2000 - 12:57pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] Maryanne, or, you could be like me, post often, and LONG! Andy, thank-you for answering about the # of reactions. Best wishes!
------------------

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