Different Beliefs/Plans regarding management of PA/LTFA in the Same Classroom/School

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 12:54am
MommaBear's picture
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Different "Plans", so to speak, for/among PA students or other LTFA students. (Feel free to use another food allergy), [i]that's a given.[/i]

Pro's?

Con's?

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 2:05am
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

Interesting question, MommaBear. The [b]cons[/b] that I can think of: confusing for teacher, classmates, and parents. I think it would be very hard for others to keep track of the different rules/recommendations for each child. The only [b]"pro"[/b] I can think of would be that each child need only be "restricted" as far as his/her parents/doctor felt was absolutely necessary, taking into account his or her own personal circumstances.
hmmm, it's good fodder for thought.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 2:38am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

This is exactly the problem I am dealing with at my PA sons school! There are 4 others there with PA and they all regarded with extreme difference. My son is the ONLY ONE that has an Epi-pen and benedryl there. The others are much too relaxed about it IMO. Some of the kids occasionally eat "may contains." The saythisis ok because it only causes the eyes to swell and water... I have even seen them eat off the buffets offered at special times.
The one that surprises me the most is the son of a neurosurgeon. He is also in our cub scout pack. I have seen this child eat at the Friday fish fries and numerous buffets. BUT during the Christmas party, a mom helping in his classroom came seeking me out specifically to see if I had any extra nut free treats for him. The child said he could not eat anything there due to cross contamination and he did not have any "safe treats" at school. YOu think they would have at least tried to address this "before" the party.....

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 2:54am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

California Mom, I agree with your post. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
From my own personal experience, when there have been other PA parents at the school my PA son attends (different schools, different towns), I've always looked like Psycho Mom from He** because I have a written school plan for Jesse (even if it got nixed this year by the principal) which *most* other Canadian PA parents do not; I have what *may* be considered a tight comfort zone and what I feel are tight requirements for a "peanut free" classrooms (i.e., my still maintaining after all these years that I don't want "may contains" in the classrooms and that I believe it is a do-able thing not to have them in the classroom); and even from what I've seen with the two most recent other PA children (one last year, one this year) where the child does not wear an Epi-belt.
It had been a requirement of Jesse's first school that he have his Epi-pen right on his body and that's where it's always been.
Also, I did see the emergency medical plan last year for the other PA child and it differed GREATLY from mine.
Quite frankly, I'd rather Jesse be the only PA child in the whole school than to have other PA parents in the school with more lax "comfort zones" than mine. Even though I remember clearly when he was the only PA child in school (and I did still bang my head against the wall to get my requirements met), I didn't feel as though the school administration or other PA parents were looking at me as though I was psychotic, neurotic or any of those other nasty labels that can apply when you do have the requirements I do.
The Mom of the PA child in Ember's class has started to come to the school to pick her child up. Previously it had always been the Dad and he only spoke with me once about his son's allergy. The Mom seems more open to conversation, just in general, but you know what, I don't even want to talk to her about PA. That must sound terrible because I *talk* to so many people here who have different comfort zones than I do and I respect their comfort zones. But these are the parents that provided the list I was given from Ember's teacher at the beginning of the school year that I asked where the he** it came from, it was so not okay with me.
Went into babble speak, something to do with sleep deprivation, having to rush out again after my course this morning (Jesse has to have an ultrasound for his urology *problem*), am also in pain which I thought had subsided, but basically, California Mom, if I could have been succinct (which, when that day comes everyone will drop dead from relief [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] ), I would have echoed your post exactly.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 3:07am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Pro's:
Opportunity to possibly learn from one another?
Con's:
Possibility of another child existing under a higher Standard of Care?
..........wait, is that a [i]Con[/i]?

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 6:46am
Nutternomore's picture
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I recall that we sort of got into this issue over in this thread: [url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum19/HTML/000055.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum19/HTML/000055.html[/url]
So, I think that if we had national standards around the management of LTFA's in schools, then the benefit is that there would be a [i]threshold[/i] standard of care that would apply to all. Things like minimizing the use of food in the curriculum, emphasis on handwashing, expectations re:management of Epi-pens/emergency protocols,etc.
Not only would that also help others kids with LTFA's whose parents might not advocate as strenuously, but it would also reduce the risk for those undiagnosed kids who might experience their first reaction at school.
That being said, I also believe that plans do need some degree of customization, and we need to continue to allow for that. Each child's physiology, their degree of maturity/self-sufficiency, combined with the physical layout/usage of school facilities, and details surrounding individual classroom management (among other things) all factor into development of a solid plan for a particular child.

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 7:11am
renny's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

Well said Nutternomore, I agree completely.

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 7:46am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Nutternomore:
[b]I recall that we sort of got into this issue over in this thread: [url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum19/HTML/000055.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum19/HTML/000055.html[/url]
So, I think that if we had national standards around the management of LTFA's in schools, then the benefit is that there would be a [i]threshold[/i] standard of care that would apply to all.Things like minimizing the use of food in the curriculum, emphasis on handwashing, expectations re:management of Epi-pens/emergency protocols,etc.[/b]
[i]school nurses..............[/i]
***see thread referenced. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
(it's amazing how all these threads and ideas fit together, isn't it? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]---- And I wasn't even trying.)
Quote:Originally posted by Nutternomore:
[b]Not only would that also help others kids with LTFA's whose parents might not advocate as strenuously, but it would also reduce the risk for those undiagnosed kids who might experience their first reaction at school.
That being said, I also believe that plans do need some degree of customization, and we need to continue to allow for that. Each child's physiology, their degree of maturity/self-sufficiency, combined with the physical layout/usage of school facilities, and details surrounding individual classroom management (among other things) all factor into development of a solid plan for a particular child.[/b]
You [i]sound[/i] like a nurse. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [i]An appropriately prepared, experienced, BSN (or higher) Certified School Nurse (RN).[/i]
[b]("full-time registered nurse all day, every day for each school.")[/b]
[b]I. am. so. excited![/b]
Nutternomore, [i]you made my day.[/i]
PS.........[i]way to refresh a thread.[/i] I couldn't have done it better myself. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited April 06, 2004).]

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 11:55am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]Con's:
Possibility of another child existing under a higher Standard of Care?
..........wait, is that a [i]Con[/i]?
[/b]
It [i]can[/i] be "a con" for me. If the trade off of a higher Standard of Care comes at a cost that is not beneficial IMO. A higher standard of care means that you are giving up your (parental) control. I, for the most part, have agreed to a higher standard of care. But I have fought it when it seems to come at an [i]unnecessary [/i]expense. I have worked closely with my DD's allergist to make this assessment.

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 12:43pm
Chicago's picture
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Joined: 04/21/2001 - 09:00

Not sure how to phrase all of this... Sorry, it is long.
There is another PA child at dd's school, who is PA and who has a PN free table since she is contact sensitive. DD (now almost 10) has never had a contact reaction or needed to sit a PN free table in school.
The PN free table is usually only used by the one child, I think somewhat because of the use of peanut products and somewhat because of the misunderstandings about what might be safe and not wanting to put the PA child in danger. In the beginning, the PA child was alone at the table. I thought that the school could have done a better job in explaining the situation, as I know that there were kids who would have sat with the PA child at lunch, but they didn't know what was in their lunch and were not sure it would be safe.
So...my dd sat at the PN free table for a while to keep the new PA child company, but then she wanted to return to the regular table to be with her friends. We talked with the school and she had now been at the normal table for all of this year (as she was for several years before, w/o trouble, not counting day care situations)
DD likes the other PA child, but she doesn't want or need the same restrictions. So why should they have the same plan?
I understand that the school staff needs to have some sort of framework for how to deal with FA, but I would hope that they could still be fexible.

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 1:32pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Chicago, a question, and you certainly don't have to answer. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
If your PA child didn't eat in the cafeteria, but in the classroom (as is done here in Ontario in elementary school) and the other PA child was in your child's classroom and a "peanut free" classroom was requested/required by the other PA parents, would you be okay with that?
Again, you don't have to answer. I was just being curious (as always [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] )
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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