Did your doctor send you home without an Epi-Pen* ?

Posted on: Thu, 09/27/2001 - 1:10am
Chris PeanutAllergy Com's picture
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Joined: 04/25/2001 - 09:00

Please post to help educate those doctor's who need more education on peanut allergy (many are reading these discussion boards and contacting us here at the office)(pediatricians and board certified allergists included).

Also this will help others who were not told about Epi-Pens* and why they are so important. (many contact us and tell us they were just sent home and told not to eat peanuts).

Please feel free to add your comments on this topic!

------------------
Stay Safe,

[email]Chris@PeanutAllergy.Com[/email]

Posted on: Thu, 09/27/2001 - 1:28am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Chris,
It was 3 1/2 years ago, but the best I can recall is we were told about avoiding the P/TN but not about the cross-contamination. I specifically remember that we treated our son to an ice cream (Baskin Robbins) right after the appointment!!! GASP!!!
After talking to a couple people who knew people w/PA, we were alerted to the cross-contam. issue. I called the allergist's office to confirm this possibility, and was then told that cross-contam. was definitely something to avoid. Oh yeah, we were given the videos to watch, too (It Only Takes One Bite and Alexander).
We were not given an Epi - I don't think. I DO remember going directly to the pharmacy to get the script filled for 2 Epis, though.
If I find out for sure, I'll edit.
Take care,
Tammy

Posted on: Thu, 09/27/2001 - 1:41am
Beth's picture
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Joined: 03/06/1999 - 09:00

Yes, epipen wasn't even mentioned. "Stay away from peanuts" was pretty much it.(13-14 yrs ago) I found the Food Allergy Network on my own, along with 99% of what I know about peanut allergy. My newest concern is how to get my daughter a CAP rast test. We recently dropped the allergist, and now just have the pediatrician. She gave us what we needed for the new school year, but was no help as far as the blood test. My daughter has NEVER had blood drawn for this, only has had skin tests, the 2nd set just a year or so ago. Of course she was still + for peanuts. I told the ped this and she said "well she ovbiously is still allergic because of the skin reaction". I feel like we don't have all the info we need, yet I'm not sure how to get it!

Posted on: Thu, 09/27/2001 - 2:55am
Leahtard's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2001 - 09:00

Boy this sounds familiar. My dd's allergist told us this just 2 weeks ago, just to keep her away from peanuts and she didn't need an epi-pen, I thought this was very odd since she has seasonal asthma as well and everything I have read up on so far said it would increase your risk for an allergic reaction with both of these symptoms. Needless to say we will not be going back to this office, the whole trip was annoying and disappointing as well.
Leah mom to PA dd Miah (almost 2)

Posted on: Thu, 09/27/2001 - 3:49am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

When Cayley had her 1st anaphylactic reaction, the ER doctor told us, since there was no swelling, only hives and vomiting, that we didn't need an EpiPen. He didn't refer us to an allergist and just told us to avoid peanuts.
We went to our family doctor the next day to try to get an allergist referral anyway, and his office was less than co-operative. Cayley was not quite 3 years old, and my family doctor thought she was too young for testing. I finally had to call the allergist's office myself, to ask about how old a child must be to be tested. The allergist phoned my family doctor to set up an appt., and said they test younger children than Cayley all the time.
Our allergist was fine (we saw him 2 months after the incident). He wrote a script right away for 2 EpiPens, emphasizing the serious nature of her allergy based on the size of the wheal from the skin test, and based on her reaction at the ER.
But what if I had listened to both the ER doctor and my family doctor and had not pressed ahead for testing? And how many people encounter this situation every day? See all the misinformation given to me in my post and to the others in the ones above?Definitely more education needed across the board for doctors regarding life-threatening allergies.

Posted on: Fri, 09/28/2001 - 3:37pm
MattsMom's picture
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Joined: 09/17/2000 - 09:00

When Matt had his first known reaction to peanuts (severe facial swelling after touching pb to his mouth), I mentioned it to his GP at his 6mo well-baby check-up. Nothing at all was said. When Matt had his 2nd reaction to peanuts (hands and face began to swell, runny nose, sneezing, itchy/watery/puffy eyes, and poss itchy mouth after only holding a bite of a pb+j) I brought it up at his 12mo well baby check-up, along with a question. I had heard that a friend of a friend had a "shot-pen" for her son because he was allergic to peanuts which was "one of the worst things to be allergic to". So after I told him about the reaction, the GP said (and I quote!) "no more pb+j sandwhiches for him, then, huh?". Then I asked if Matt needed a "shot-pen". I was told that no, he did not, and that even if he did, they didn't come in the right strength for my then 12mo, 22lb son.
Almost a year went by, and then I literally happened upon this site one night. I got educated REAL quick. Within 2wks I had gotten the kids covered on insurance so that we could get in to an allergist. I switched drs and Matt had his initial visit w/ the new PEDIATRICIAN Nov 16, 2000. We walked out of her office with a prescription for 2 epipens and a referral to an allergist. She also showed us how to administer the epipen, using an epipen trainer that she keeps in her office for just such occasions. I simply LOVE our ped! =)
The first allergist visit went at least as well. She gave us a prescription for another 2 epipens so that we could keep one at grandma's, etc. She also recommended joining FAAN and seemed to know of (at least) this website. We watched a video on anaphylaxis and food allergies, though I'm not 100% sure of the title. It featured our allergist, Dr. Susan Rudd Wynn, of Ft. Worth, TX. She also gave us a few hand-outs on peanut allergy and went over briefly cross-contamination, hidden ingredients, etc. I really feel she would have covered things more in depth if we had not already been well-informed. (She could tell we were just by the stack of stuff I'd brought with me in case SHE wasn't. LOL)
The one area I'm not extremely satisfied with our allergist in is the CAP-RAST testing. From all I've heard/read/seen the CAP-RAST is very reliable and helpful in tracking peanut allergy and whether or not it has been outgrown. Not 100%, obviously, but pretty close. Our allergist, however, feels that the CAP-RAST testing is not all that reliable, that the skin testing is much better (though she would not test Matt for peanuts on the skin-prick as she did not want to risk a severe reaction...nor did we, so that was fine by us!), and that re-testing doesn't need to be done but every "few" years. Personally, I'd like to test the peanuts via CAP-RAST now, and then again every year or so.
Other than the CAP-RAST issue, I am totally satisfied with our allergist, as well. I think we've got a really great team going here to help keep Matt safe and healthy! =)

Posted on: Sat, 09/29/2001 - 12:11pm
Renee111064's picture
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Joined: 07/05/2001 - 09:00

WE were sent to a determologist for my son first since he had extreme eczema.
Drew had bad reactions to formula when he was a baby, he threw up everything until we tried Nutramagin(sp?) (predigested) formula.
Drew started seeing an allergist at one but he would not test Drew. Drew was skin tested when he was two. That is when I found out that he was allergic to nuts. I had never given peanut butter to him.
Right then and there the doctor told me that I am never to give him anything with nuts ever and gave me a script for an epi-pen and told me that I must get the epi-pen TODAY and always carry it everywhere Drew was. Drew was never tested for any of the tree nuts but I avoid them regardless.
The doctor thinks that he may outgrow his allergies to the many other foods, but told me that he most likely would not outgrow the nut allergy.
Best wishes to all,
Renee [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 09/30/2001 - 11:23am
rejubu's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2001 - 09:00

My dd had a skin test done mid August. The doctor said that she had a mild reaction to peanuts. Don't give her peanut butter. After finding this website and some others I called back and asked if I needed to be reading labels. He said "yes" in a tone that sounded to me that I should have known that answer. After calling the Health Department to try to find more information and having them ask about an Epi pen, I called the doctor back. I asked if she needed an Epi pen. His answer is no she has never had a reaction after having peanut butter. I told him that it was only ever offered once and she refused to eat it. Well he says she has had peanuts in candy bars. I explained to him that she has never had a candy bar because she is lactose intolerant and most candy bars have milk. DUH!!!! I feel like I am rambling but I am starting to have second thoughts about her allergist. He also told me that if I kept her away from all traces of peanuts for a year he would retest her and she will probably be okay. She goes to see her regular doctor for her 2 year old check up next week and I will discuss it with him. Thanks for listening. Julie

Posted on: Sun, 09/30/2001 - 11:53am
Leahtard's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2001 - 09:00

Julie your dd's allergist and my dd's sound the same, lol I already cancelled her follow visit there with him, I have found a great allergist since her visit that has a more serious attitude about PA. He actually told me that before he camein to see dd and I that the mom before us came in because her dd had an allergic reaction to milk and all he told her was she better keep her away from milk then, gee what a wise quote huh??
Leah [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Quote:Originally posted by rejubu:
[b]My dd had a skin test done mid August. The doctor said that she had a mild reaction to peanuts. Don't give her peanut butter. After finding this website and some others I called back and asked if I needed to be reading labels. He said "yes" in a tone that sounded to me that I should have known that answer. After calling the Health Department to try to find more information and having them ask about an Epi pen, I called the doctor back. I asked if she needed an Epi pen. His answer is no she has never had a reaction after having peanut butter. I told him that it was only ever offered once and she refused to eat it. Well he says she has had peanuts in candy bars. I explained to him that she has never had a candy bar because she is lactose intolerant and most candy bars have milk. DUH!!!! I feel like I am rambling but I am starting to have second thoughts about her allergist. He also told me that if I kept her away from all traces of peanuts for a year he would retest her and she will probably be okay. She goes to see her regular doctor for her 2 year old check up next week and I will discuss it with him. Thanks for listening. Julie[/b]

Posted on: Mon, 10/15/2001 - 5:07am
sbd's picture
sbd
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Joined: 01/05/2001 - 09:00

I called my daughter's ped when she began having a reaction to her first taste of PB at 12 1/2 months. He told us to give her Benadryl and then go to the ER. At the ER she received a shot, even though the Benadryl was beginning to bring some of the facial swelling down. The ER doctor told us to follow up with our pediatrician. Our ped ordered a blood panel that contained peanuts and several other common food allergens (milk, soy, shellfish...) She tested positive for peanuts only. He said to keep her away from peanuts and to play it safe that for now she should avoid food with any type of peanut warning (made in the same facility...) He said that we would test her again when she is four. I asked about an epi-pen and he said it wasn't necessary. After a few weeks, it bothered me that we did not get one. So I called and asked for one, and got it without issue. I said that I would rather have it and not need it, than need it and not have it. During her 18 month check-up I asked if I could have a few more to keep in the house, diaper bag... Again, I got these without a problem. He did caution me to stay on top of the expiration dates. We were never referred to an allergist andat this point I do not think it is necessary.

Posted on: Sat, 11/24/2001 - 5:06am
smack's picture
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Joined: 11/14/2001 - 09:00

With my son it was 4 months before his 3rd birthday when by accident he had a cookie with p.j. in it. We were holding off giving our twins p.j. or nuts, or shellfish under our doctors orders. This wasn't because of any food allergies we have either because we don't, (my husband has environmental only) but because she was educated with the newest research dealing with allergies.
When my son had his reaction, my new male doctor (we had to change because we moved) prescribed epipens told us how to use one and set us up with an appointment to see a allergist.
Sounds like common sense to me, why is there such a difference with the practices of what to do if an allergy is suspected?

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