DAY CARE AND PEANUT ALLERGY

Posted on: Fri, 02/05/1999 - 11:41am
dhumphries's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

I AM LOSING MY CURRENT DAY CARE PROVIDER WHO IS VERY AWARE OF MY SON'S ALLERGY. ANY TIPS ON GETTING THE FUTURE PROVIDER TO NOT SERVE PEANUT PRODUCTS AT ALL? MY SON IS ONLY 2 YRS OLD, AND DOES NOT KNOW NOT TO PICK UP THINGS OFF THE FLOOR TO EAT, SO ANY PEANUT PRODUCTS SERVED IS SCARY. ANY ADVISE IS APPRECIATED. I WISH I COULD AFFORD TO STAY AT HOME, BUT THIS IS JUST NOT POSSIBLE.

Posted on: Sat, 02/06/1999 - 3:46pm
Nicole's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/21/1999 - 09:00

<p>Hi !</p>
<p>If I were in your position, I would try to take some time away from work and spend time at the new day care center where your child spends all of their time. This would allow you to understand the things that could be a problem for your child. I find that mealtime is not the only problem I have at my son's preschool. We have to be aware of project time and many other special projects going on. If you were there to initially help your new day care person out, this would help them ease into a comfort level and you could rest assured that your child is being cared for the way that you want. Good luck. Nicole</p>

Posted on: Wed, 02/10/1999 - 8:27am
Lschubert's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

<p>HAVE YOU LOOKED INTO HAVING IN HOME CARE? FROM WHAT I HAVE SEEN WITH NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS IT IS ABOUT THE SAME IN COSTS BUT YOUR OWN SAFE HOME. GOOD LUCK</p>

Posted on: Sat, 02/13/1999 - 2:16pm
Sue's picture
Sue
Offline
Joined: 02/13/1999 - 09:00

<p>If you have a La Petite Acadamy day care in your area, I would talk to them. They have had the US government settle a law suit between them and some parents regarding peanut allergies - I think they paid $55,000.00 for discrimination - they settled out of court (?). They have agreed to keep the Epi Pen on site and administer it. The school I contacted said they would remove all peanut products from that La Petite site if I enrolled my peanut allergic daughter.</p>

Posted on: Tue, 03/09/1999 - 11:51am
dhumphries's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

Hi all,
Just wanted to post that I think I have found a safe day care facility for my son. i spoke with the assistant director today.
These are the issues we talked about:
Menus - she said no peanut butter would be served in my son's room at all.
Labeling - gave her the FAN info on tabu ingredients and she said that she would personally oversee what the cook ordered and read labels for ingredients
Shared facilities - she said that my son's age group classroom is only used for Church Toddler SS classes and nursery. She said the room was swept, mopped, and wiped down each Sunday and Wednesday after church
Snacks - she said the only food brought in by parents were an occasional birthday treat. She will distribute the FAN info to each parent, and will make sure that they have something else for my son to eat even if the parents say their treats are safe
Epipen - She will personally work with each of the teachers on the administration of the Epipen and on emergency procedures. I gave her the Parent/Teacher book from FAN.
She said she understood that a life could be at stake here and would continue to monitor my son's day care plan.
Can anyone else think of something I have missed.

Posted on: Tue, 03/09/1999 - 10:20pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

It definitely sounds like this new day care will be very accomodating to your needs. One thing you might want to do is bring in your child's own food and snacks. This way you KNOW the food you are sending in is safe.
Good luck to you! I hope this day care works out for you!

Posted on: Wed, 03/10/1999 - 10:24am
Kathryn's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/17/1999 - 09:00

Hi, just a note about food for your son when birthday treats are offered. Ask that the treats not include any nut ingredients and equally importantly try to send something special for your son to eat. My son, Troy, is four and he sometimes has trouble coping with the fact that everyone else has something exotic, as in new and different, to eat and he has the usual replacement cupcake or square or something not so unusual. I have tried lately to surprise him with a specially decorated cupcake or theme shaped cookie etcetera. It keeps me hopping to find new ideas but its worth it. Also, be sure that he knows that the treat that everyone else is eating is not going to cause an allergic reaction in him. I learned after one party that my son had stayed away from the rest of the class and in fact had spent most of the food break time in the cloak room because the other kids had mucky icing on their hands and he was afraid that it would be like peanut butter if they touched him. I was heartbroken for him. He needs to be aware but he was scaring himself unnecessarily.
One final note, try to get parents to avoid bringing cakes etcetera from neighbourhood or grocery store bakeries where cross-contamination is hard to avoid. Nut dust and small pieces from shared cooling trays, storage racks, etcetera can be a problem. The parents of the children in Troy's class have not found that request too arduous.

Posted on: Sun, 03/21/1999 - 2:34pm
Sergei Plishka's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/21/1999 - 09:00

Hello and good luck.
I saw a TV news piece about some elementary schools that established "peanut-free zones." No food containing peanuts was allowed in these areas, so students with very sensitive allergies felt safe eating there (as you know, some children's lives are at risk from peanut residue on hands touching mouths).
This probably won't help your 2 year old, but is an option for later years.
-Sergei.

Posted on: Mon, 03/22/1999 - 12:36pm
dhumphries's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

After reading all the information and having a paramedic speak about anyphylaxis last week, the director decided to take all peanut butter and peanut products off the menu. This was my sons second day, and both days they called me about ingredients on labels which they had trouble interpreting. I feel extremely lucky that they are being so diligent there. Of course, my son has been so traumatized by the new surroundings, that he hasn't even eaten a bite since he's been there, so thus far I haven't had to worry! Hope this turns around soon.

Posted on: Tue, 03/23/1999 - 3:40am
Julia M's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/23/1999 - 09:00

I'm glad you found such a good daycare! We have been working with my 15 month old's daycare room and are comfortable with their precautions. I don't know if this is part of the FAN plan, but one thing I've done -just in case- is to make a little poster that has the graphic from the EpiPen package insert and with stepwise emergency instructions (Eg. 1-administer EpiPen, 2-call 911 etc.). They laminated it and have it posted in the room. Hope the adjustment is getting easier! Julia M

Posted on: Wed, 03/24/1999 - 12:59pm
Nancy's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/06/2002 - 09:00

Good idea, Julia. I've done the same thing. I also asked for the 'alternative" number for 911 (there is one in my locale) and put that on the laminated card. You hear about 911 being busy or otherwise screwed up sometimes. Also, is there any provision for when the phone lines might be down (ie is there a cell phone in the school). I know, I know, it surely doesn't happen very often, but you don't want to have some bad luck and have that be the time you need to call for help. Nancy

Pages

Forum

Click on one of the categories below to see all forum topics.

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

It Is Easy To Buy Peanut Free Chocolate Online

Ask any parent of a child with a potentially life-...

Seeds, such as pumpkin or sunflower, make great peanut or tree nut substitutes in recipes, and roasted soy or garbanzo beans are tasty snacks and...

So many wonderful recipes call for peanut butter. These recipes can still be enjoyed by experimenting with peanut butter replacements.

...

Peanuts and peanut oil are cheap and easy additives to food and other commercial goods. It is surprising (and alarming if you have a...

Those with severe peanut allergies soon learn to look for the 'peanut-free sign' on any packaged food purchase. This is a notation found on a wide...