daughter\'s dr says no need for allery tests

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 12:38am
AAA's picture
AAA
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Joined: 01/23/2006 - 09:00

Over the weekend my 5 yr old broke out in a reash after eating peanut butter then agian after eating scrambeled eggs. I took her in to her primary care dr....he says no need for allery tests because a person can get new allergies everyday. I on the other hand would like to know what else she is allergic to so we can avoid itchy rashes and trips to the hospital. Should I push the dr to refer me to an allergist?

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 1:10am
mommyofmatt's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2004 - 09:00

Yep, I'd definitely go see a pediatric allergist. Many pediatricians don't know as much about food allergies as they need to.
I agree with getting her tested to see if anything else is reactive, and an allergist will most likely prescribe an epipen, which is the best treatment for a severe allergic reaction.
Until you get to an allergist, be very careful reading labels, and avoid anything with traces of nuts or eggs. Make sure you have Benadryl in the house to treat a minor reaction. If a reaction turns major (and they can within minutes), call 911 and go to the ER in an ambulance right away. Every minute counts.
This website is a great resource, you may also want to check out foodallergy.org for help with label reading.
Feel free to ask more questions. Meg
------------------
***[b] ALLERGY ELIMINATOR*** [/b]
Meg, mom to:
Matt 3 yrs. PA,MA,EA
Sean 3 yrs. NKA

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 1:21am
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Joined: 03/27/2004 - 09:00

Absolutely make an appointment with a pediatric allergist. Your doctor doesn't seem to understand the importance of identifying allergies and learning to live with them. There is a whole self-education process when food allergies come into play. Many processed food / restaurant foods contain cross contaminants and can cause an allergic reaction when least expected.
There are medicines to carry with your child at all times and emergency plans need to be established. I wouldn't wait another day to make an appointment.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 2:04am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

AAA, welcome! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Has your child eaten peanut products and eggs before?
At any rate, I also disagree with the doctor. Yes, we understand that new allergies could develop any day, but it's important to have the ones identified now that you need to deal with.
I'd find someone to get testing done.
What did the doctor say about the rashes?
And I guess I am interested in whether or not your daughter has eaten those things before and been okay.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 3:00am
McKenziesMom's picture
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Joined: 03/05/2001 - 09:00

I think my DD was around 2 when she had her first reaction and both the ER Doctor and our GP said she was too young to scratch test at that age, as she'd probably test positively to things she wasn't allergic too. They both said to totally avoid peanuts and nuts and have her tested when she was around 5, when her immune system would be less reactive. We took their word for it. She was tested at age 5 and age 10 and probably should be tested again - she's 15 now.
I think your Doctor needs to respect your wishes and have her tested. It may point out some other foods you should avoid/use sparingly.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 3:28am
McCobbre's picture
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Joined: 04/16/2005 - 09:00

Welcome! You should also carry around some children's benadryl with you in your purse--everywhere your child goes until you see your allergist. Nuts and eggs can be hidden in the strangest places.
Until then, avoid asian restaurants, ice cream parlors, most chocolate---just to be on the safe side. I'm not sure what to avoid for egg, but that's our short list for peanuts.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 3:40am
AAA's picture
AAA
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Joined: 01/23/2006 - 09:00

thank you so much for the support and great advice. Yes, to answer the question, my daughter from 3 mos to 1 1/2 yrs old would break out in rash when eating peanut butter and any egg product. The allergy went away or dormant until just this weekend. So for almost 3 and a half years she was able to eat these ingredients with no problem. Back when she was a baby they also told me no need for any tests at that time becuase she was so young.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 3:42am
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

We had figured out that my DD was allergic to peanuts but didn't understand the seriousness and all the precautions we needed to take. When she had an anaphylactic reaction and had to go to the ER last year, the ER nurse told me I should bring her to an allergist for testing. I told that to our family practice Dr. the next day at a follow-up visit, and he didn't think it was really necessary for the peanut allergy, because we knew she had it, but he gave us a referral because he thought it would be good to know what environmental allergies she had. I wasn't sure I should bring her, either. But I'm SO glad I did. We found out which environmental allergies she has and started to manage those better, the Dr. gave us a written Food Allergy Action Plan that spells out when to use Benadryl and the Epi-Pen (and I'm supposed to give a copy of it to everyone who takes care of her when she's away from us), he advised me some on avoiding foods processed on the same equipment as peanuts and such, and now he's keeping an eye on her for asthma, which is a possibility. He was a much better guide in all of this than our regular doctor. I'd gotten just no information before. I also found it very helpful to read "The Parents' Guide to Food Allergies." Good luck! You'll get it figured out.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 4:17am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

If it is definitely the peanuts and eggs your child reacted to, then perhaps testing is unnecessary. But it should be an allergist that decides, not a pediatrician. And you still may need/ tests for other possible allergens, even if you know about peanut and egg. And if you can't get to an allergist quickly, please ask your pediatrician for a prescription for an epi-pen.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 4:07pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Besides, you may HAVE to get some test results so that care providers and schools will be able to have an emergency plan that includes administration of medications. (adding up 1.5 yrs and 3 yrs got me to .... preschool age!) With those two allergies, you will need an allergist who can help you as you work with schools. They certainly aren't going to just take your word for it, but you will need to make some modifications for your child's safety in that kind of environment. (peanut butter birdfeeders.... royal icing, candy handouts in school) You get the idea. No matter how conservative or liberal you decide to be about the allergy, there will be SOME changes that are necessary. So you DO need to know.
This probably isn't something that a GP should handle, since allergists are used to dealing with that sort of thing. (JMO) Also has never been clear to me why "too young to test" still seems to come up. Several of our well-respected allergists have laughed at this notion, especially with regard to food allergies.
Welcome to you! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 1:10am
mommyofmatt's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2004 - 09:00

Yep, I'd definitely go see a pediatric allergist. Many pediatricians don't know as much about food allergies as they need to.
I agree with getting her tested to see if anything else is reactive, and an allergist will most likely prescribe an epipen, which is the best treatment for a severe allergic reaction.
Until you get to an allergist, be very careful reading labels, and avoid anything with traces of nuts or eggs. Make sure you have Benadryl in the house to treat a minor reaction. If a reaction turns major (and they can within minutes), call 911 and go to the ER in an ambulance right away. Every minute counts.
This website is a great resource, you may also want to check out foodallergy.org for help with label reading.
Feel free to ask more questions. Meg
------------------
***[b] ALLERGY ELIMINATOR*** [/b]
Meg, mom to:
Matt 3 yrs. PA,MA,EA
Sean 3 yrs. NKA

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