Cross-Reactive Allergies

Posted on: Sun, 02/18/2001 - 2:30pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

pUPDATED MAY 18 2005/p
pI hope this thread will prove to be helpful to people suffering from/p

Posted on: Sun, 02/18/2001 - 2:32pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Here is information on the Legume family:
1. Legumes are the seeds of plants of the family Fabaceae, previously known as Leguminosae. The family is large and contains species that can grow in most soils and climates. Legumes include: dried beans, dried peas, lentils, peanuts, soya beans, bean sprouts.
2. Beans, properly called "legumes" have been a source of good nutrition for more than 10,000 years. Some common types are chickpeas, lentils, black, red and navy beans. They

Posted on: Mon, 02/19/2001 - 1:54am
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Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

Cayley's mom, thanks for posting this. Can you tell me where you found the information? When Ben was tested for peanuts, the allergist mentioned that peanuts can cross-react with 2 kinds of grass--Timothy and Bermuda. He tested highly positive to them. The problem is, I could never find any written information on grass and peanuts. Also, if this is true, I don't really understand what this means. Could Ben be allergic to a different component of peanuts than most PA people? Does this mean he's really allergic to grass and not to peanuts? (He's never reacted to peanuts.)
The cross-reactivity on pecans was interesting too. Ben has complained of an itchy mouth after eating corn and bananas, but pecan was the only nut he tested negative for. A lot to think about. Thanks again for researching it.

Posted on: Mon, 02/19/2001 - 4:02am
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Bensmom - today is absolutely crazy around here, so I'll just give you several website addresses from which I researched this thread.
I don't really know how to answer your question about Ben's peanut and grass reactivity (although it was probably rhetorical anyway!). Trying to decipher the reams of medical speak on some of the webpages has given me brain-ache! Hopefully you can find what you're looking for at these websites! The 3rd website seems particularly informative. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[url="http://www.eallergy.net/food.htm"]http://www.eallergy.net/food.htm[/url]
[url="http://www.pnf.org/foods.html#High"]http://www.pnf.org/foods.html#High[/url]
[url="http://www.cyberdiet.com/modules/aa/diet_challenge/cross/basic_cross.html"]http://www.cyberdiet.com/modules/aa/diet_challenge/cross/basic_cross.html[/url]
There is a LOT more information to be posted under this thread - its just finding the time to do it. For example, exercise-induced anaphylaxis can be triggered by exercising vigorously within 4 hours after ingesting certain foods, like wheat, if the sensitivity to wheat is present.
My head is spinning from the overwhelming amount of info I'm trying to weed through! I'll try to add to this thread a few times throughout the week.

Posted on: Mon, 02/19/2001 - 2:24pm
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Cayley's Mom, I simply wanted to thank you for posting this wealth of information. I really think it may be helpful with people that are dealing with mysterious reactions and also makes all of us aware. This took a lot of work on your part and I hope you are thanked over and over for this, although I know that it not why you posted the information. It is simply wonderful though.
I was really fortunate. When I had Jesse's allergy testing done, his allergist did actually give me a sheet showing that if he was allergic to this he could also probably react to that. Now, if I could only find the sheet. But, again, I was fortunate. From what I read here about people's experiences with allergists, I highly doubt that most people are given this really important information.
Thank-you for giving it to us and taking the time to work on what I consider a major project.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Mon, 02/19/2001 - 9:21pm
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Joined: 11/01/2000 - 09:00

Thanks, Cayley's Mom ... great info. Must have been a pain in the butt collecting it all. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] Well worth the trouble, though!!
------------------
Nick (PA sufferer)

Posted on: Tue, 02/20/2001 - 2:44am
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Joined: 09/17/2000 - 09:00

VERY useful info!! Makes me suspect Matt's being allergic to latex even more, unfortunetly. He is allergic to watermelon and peaches, both of which I have seen listed (here and elsewhere) as being cross-reactive to latex, and I have also recently been suspecting tomatoe! Another one listed as being cross-reactive. I think I'm going to print this list out to put in our Allergy file. Thanks for taking the time to do this!

Posted on: Tue, 02/20/2001 - 3:17am
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Wow! Thanks everyone for your positive comments! I'm glad you're finding this list helpful - it still needs fine-tuning and additions, but all the above info is accurate, if a little less than complete!
BENSMOM - You mentioned Ben gets an itchy mouth when he eats bananas. Is he allergic to Ragweed? I ask because bananas cross-react to the ragweed pollen, but the cross-reaction should ONLY occur during ragweed season. Bananas are usually tolerated by ragweed sufferers at other times of the year. I'm just curious! Also, and I have to research this further, grass and peanut seem to cross-react due to similar antigens present in both, while they're still in seed form. Perhaps (stress the perhaps, please!) the antigen becomes slightly altered at maturity - and Ben is more sensitive to the mature grass antigen and less sensitive to the mature peanut antigen. Just a theory - I'm definitely NOT saying Ben won't react to peanuts!!! More research is indicated - if you do ask your allergist about this, I would be very interested in his answer! Thanks! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 02/22/2001 - 3:03am
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Joined: 08/16/2000 - 09:00

From an old post of mine (digusting but possibly relevant in this thread):
For the wild and imaginative amongst us (with strong stomachs) here's a link to an article about certain cockroach proteins being cloned and found to possibly be responsible for certain allergies in people. Lunch, anyone?
[url="http://www.bioscience.org/news/scientis/allergy.htm"]www.bioscience.org/news/scientis/allergy.htm[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 02/22/2001 - 3:21am
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Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

Cayley's Mom,
Hmm, when is ragweed season? I don't know if he's allergic to ragweed, but he does have seasonal allergies. Sometimes he will eat a banana with no complaints. I'll start paying attention to when it bothers him. I do recall him eating one recently with no complaints.

Posted on: Thu, 02/22/2001 - 4:38am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Bensmom - ragweed season lasts from late summer to late fall in most parts of the U.S. and Canada. Here is an excerpt on ragweed and other pollen I copied from an allergy website:
~~~~~~~~~~~
What is Pollen?
The pollen of such trees as oak, western red cedar, elm, birch, ash, hickory, poplar, sycamore, maple, cypress, and walnut is often the cause of early spring seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Late spring and early summer hay fever is usually caused by pollinating grasses, including timothy, bermuda, orchard, sweet vernal, red top, and some blue grasses.
Besides ragweed, which is considered to be the pollen most responsible for late summer and fall hay fever in North America, other weeds that can cause pollen allergy include sagebrush, pigweed, tumbleweed, Russian thistle, and cockleweed.
~~~~~~~~~~~
Hope this helps explain the time frames for other possible cross-reactive pollens, too. Interestingly, the article goes on to mention that moving away from a certain area because of allergies rarely helps.
A person allergic to one kind of pollen in one geographic area is almost certain to become sensitized to the new area's pollen with a year or two of the move. Doesn't really seem like one can get away from environmental allergies, does it?

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