Corn and soybean too? I need help!!

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To make a very long story as short as I can, we had Drew (7 yrs.) allergy tested for the first time last week. After we were unable to find an allergist within 6 hours to do the ImmunoCap before November, we ordered the test ourselves, and just got the results today.

His peanut was >100, walnut was 63.84 - those were no surprise. HOWEVER, corn came back 5.64 (Class 3, I believe) and soybean was 12.50 (also Class 3).

Needless to say, we are now trying to get in with a local allergist just to help us with these results. We didn't expect him to be positive to corn or soy - never any hives....maybe a trigger for his asthma or eczema. Obviously, not life-threatening for him since he ingests them regularly. However, if it will increase his chances of outgrowing them or helping with other medical problems, we will avoid them.

What do people with corn and soy allergies eat? I'm going to start looking in the recipe section because I can see already (from the labels in my pantry) there's going to be a lot of home-cooking done around here.

On a good note.....no more egg allergy!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Aug 10, 2005

Our allergist says that a cap rast is not accurate unless it is done at one specific lab. The lab is in Kansas. We are in California, and he always makes sure the blood is sent there. He said if the blood is sent anywhere else, the result is often incorrect. So since your child tolerates corn and soy, maybe the result is not correct?

On Aug 10, 2005

Drew's mom, I konw exactly how you feel. I brought my son in for testing because I suspected a soy allergy. During 1 of his reactions, he ate peas and a product containg soy. During another, he ate a beans and aproduct containing soy. My intent was just to have him tested for a soy allergy. The allergist did a skin test not only to soy but also to peas and beans. I thought he was crazy because my son has eaten peas and beans his whole life without incident. Much to my surprise, the skin test showed, not only a reaction to soy, but also an even greater reaction to the peas. We followed up with a CAP RAST which confirmed the soy and pea allergy and also showed a mild allergy to beans. Like you, I was very confused. Based on my son's situation, my allergist does not believe that my son will outgrow these allergies and said they will probably always remain a "nuisance".

My allergist used an analogy of a cup to try to explain this to me. My son can fill his cup (meaning eat) with peas, beans, and soy so long as it doesn't overflow (eat too much of a combination of any/all of the 3). If the cup starts to overflow then he will have a reaction.

That diagnosis was about 4-5 months ago. We are avoiding peas. I decided to do that because Michael's test results to peas was fairly high and he hasn't really liked them for awhile. I suspect that is probably due to the allergy. I let him eat beans, which he still likes, but I limit the portions. I have tried to switch some of his favorite foods to brands that don't contain soy. For those that I can't, I only let him eat smaller amounts and never in combination with beans. So far this method has worked well for him.

I don't know if this story helps you at all. I must admit that I still don't quite understand this allergy very well. Peanut allergies are so much more clear cut. I would be very interested to hear what your allergist says when you do see one.

On Aug 10, 2005

Carefulmom - Do you know the name of the lab in Kansas? Or where in KS it is located? We are close to the KS border.

Michaelsmom - The cup analogy makes perfect sense to me. And DH and I were thinking along those lines already, since he has never had hives because of corn or soy. It might be causing asthma or eczema flare ups (that we assumed were seasonal allergy related). So many unanswered questions are going through my mind! I definitely have mommy guilt for not getting him tested before now. Thanks for sharing that information with me! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Aug 10, 2005

DS is allergic to both corn and soy. We thought corn wasn't bothering him either until we took him off it. Then his yucky poops cleared up. It took a while for his intestines to heal because the corn had done so much damage - he was experiencing malabsorption and had symptoms similar to celiac disease. In addition to his gut reaction he also has a cerebral reaction to corn (not uncommon in corn allergy). After he was off of corn we always knew if he accidentally got any because 3 hours to the minute from eating he would go emotionally wacko. There is an avoiding corn forum on Delphi that is very helpful because corn is in just about everything [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

After DS tested positive for soy we didn't eliminate it right away because there were so many positives we concentrated on eliminating the higher numbers first. We had never seen DS reacting in any way to soy, but about 6 months after he tested positive, he began to get hives on his face just about every time he ate. The allergist said to check for soy. Sure enough - we eliminated major soy and the hives stopped. DS has always been able to tolerate some soy we just try not to overload him. Unfortunately, if we did find something that was corn-free it often had one of his other allergens in it esp. soy.

When DS tested positive to things we didn't think we'd ever seen him react to, our allergist had us eliminate the item for 2 weeks. Then when we reintroduced it if he truely was allergic to it, he would react strongly enough for us to see the reaction. For example wheat - after the 2 week elimination I fed DS some spagetti noodles. He had an asthma attack while eating, so we knew wheat triggered his asthma.

When you start getting into multiple allergies that are very hard to avoid, but not life threatening you almost have to play with how much can be tolerated rather than strict avoidance. As DS got older he was able to tolerate more than when he was younger, so I feel he was still in the process of outgrowing those allergies even with the exposures. Now that he's on Xolair, we'll never know if he outgrows the allergies. But it doesn't matter because they're not affecting him - yea!

Good luck! Rebekah

On Aug 11, 2005

RebekahC - Thank you for responding. I did a

On Aug 11, 2005

Hi Drew's Mom ~

DS is 8 (almost 9) and was diagnosed at age 3. He has a huge list of food allergies but corn was definitely the most challenging. We weren't sure if he would outgrow or not, but we were hopeful. With peanuts and nuts we didn't even bother to hope KWIM? His allergist was tracking his CAP RAST numbers yearly but at the time we went on Xolair, they weren't really budging (always Class 3). After starting Xolair, we will never be able to allergy test him again, so we'll never know for sure if he's outgrown it or not.

Yes, you did understand correctly Logan can now eat most of his allergic foods (dairy, wheat, corn, soy, potato, yeast, carrot, etc) with no reaction. We will never do nuts/peanuts or straight egg though.

Since allergy testing is never 100% accurate I really think it would be worth doing a trial off of corn for a couple of weeks and then re-introducing it to see if Drew is really allergic and just how it affects him - especially since his numbers are low. You may find that some corn is okay, but too much isn't or that it doesn't seem to really bother him. My e-mail is in my profile if you need help label reading. There are lots of terms that mean corn and it doesn't even have to be listed at all. Quite challenging...

Rebekah

On Aug 11, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by rebekahc: [b]After starting Xolair, we will never be able to allergy test him again,...[/b]

Why? I don't understand. Is it because it is a daily preventative medicine that his doctor doesn't want him to go without (in order to test)?

[b]

Quote:

You may find that some corn is okay, but too much isn't or that it doesn't seem to really bother him. [/b]

That's what we are hoping! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[b]

Quote:

My e-mail is in my profile if you need help label reading. [/b]

Thank you!!!

On Aug 11, 2005

Xolair is not a daily preventative. It's an anti-IgE medication & since allergy tests test for IgE mediated responses, they become useless. Also, according to our pulmonologist, Xolair is at this point a lifelong medication because of the risks involved with stopping the meds (anaphylaxis). There is some speculation that gradually weaning could work but I don't think that's been studied.

Rebekah

On Aug 12, 2005

Ah-ha! I get it now. Thanks for the explanation. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

On Aug 12, 2005

The lab is IBT in Lenexa, Kansas. They specialize in Allergy and Clinical Immunology. I think going off corn for two weeks, and then reintroducing it makes a lot of sense. Then do the same with soy.

[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited August 12, 2005).]

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