contact reactions not severe?

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2007 - 9:16am
LisaM's picture
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Reading an old thread that was just reraised made me think of this . . .

Dr.'s don't seem to be all that worried about contact reactions if they are not systemic. i.e. if a child has a few hives from contact, that is not considered significant.

BUT, I've read that there is concern that contact reactions can increase sensitization . . .so they can make it less likely that a child will outgrow the allergy + make it *more* likely that the child will have a more severe reaction the next time.

I quote from [url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm#statisticsjw"]http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm#statisticsjw[/url]

"Epicutaneous exposure to peanut protein prevents oral tolerance and enhances allergic sensitization.is the title of a publication that appeared in the June 2005 Clin Exp Allergy by Strid, Hourihane et al. The authors found that in a mice model, primary skin exposure prevented the subsequent induction of oral tolerance to peanut in an antigen-specific manner. Upon oral challenge, mice became further sensitized and developed strong peanut-specific IL-4 and IgE responses. Furthermore, animals with existing tolerance to peanut were partly sensitized following epicutaneous exposure.
Conclusion: Epicutaneous exposure to peanut protein can prevent induction of oral tolerance, and may even modify existing tolerance to peanut. Epidermal exposure to protein allergens selectively drives Th2-type responses, and as such may promote sensitization to food proteins upon gastrointestinal exposure.247 (posted June 29th, 2005)"

I *haven't* seen anyone refer to this study when considering what accomodations to make for allergic children in schools. Why not? It seems like a significant one to me. I suppose that since the study was done on a *mice model* they can't say for sure that humans will be affected in the same way . . . but still, I think it should give people pause before assuming that contact reactions especially in children are not any big deal.

[This message has been edited by LisaM (edited March 02, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2007 - 10:23am
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I myself don't think contact reactions(ie being hives) are too serious....if it just stays hives. The weird thing about allergies is that reactions can go from hives to worse, and you never know until it is happening. A few examples....my 1yr old was kissed by my daughter(with milk on her lips) and she got hives. No big deal, it just stayed hives, gave Bendryl and then they were gone.
But...my 6yr old recently had a contact reaction while ata basketball game. It wasn't the hives that scared me, it was the runny nose, horribly itchy eyes(he couldn't open them to see), he was scared and crying...for about 15min I debated using the Epi. I had him in the bathroom, washing every inch of hands, arms and face off in the sink. Eventually he was able to open his eyes again...and slowly(over a 30min period) the Benedyrl kicked in and his symptoms were gone......all from contact or inhalation contact at a basketball game(we were probably 50ft from people eating peanuts, but I think the chairs were covered in dust etc...).
So I can see(just hives) not being a big deal, but then what happens when it goes beyond hives....and the fact that you never know until it's happening, is what doctors(and parents) should be concerned with.
So for me, I am nervous about contact reactions. I know several parents that are not, because nothing happens when their kids are *around* it. (I had 2 parents tell me their PA child would have been fine in that situation at the basketball game). I think this just proves how VERY different these allergies are.
I hope I understood the topic of your post.... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2007 - 11:59am
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I agree... it is a very individual thing.
DD has had VERY few contact reactions because our comfort zone doesn't allow us to be in very many of those situations. But one recently (to pn, we are [i]fairly sure[/i] though the source was absolutely unclear and it is likely the amount involved was truly tiny...) involved both hives AND an asthma episode. Allergist agreed that epi seemed kind of extreme there-- but even Benadryl didn't take the edge off for almost 40 minutes. I wondered at the time.
Inhalation reactions tend to be more predictable-- though they certainly look scary enough. Asthma, red-rimmed eyes, sniffling, hives over exposed skin. I only count those as true "aerosol reactions" if the symptoms [i]resolve WITHOUT medication[/i] when we change DD's environment (by leaving). So we rarely medicate those. But contact rxns (for DD) never go away on their own.
Technically, both exposures lead to mildly anaphylactic symptoms, at least in DD.

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2007 - 12:56pm
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I avoid all contact and airborne situations for dd, although she has never had a contact or airborne reaction. I also believe that it increases the risk of a more serious reaction next time. Besides, it is so common for pa to become airborne sensitive or contact sensitive with each exposure. So when I see people posting that their child is not airborne sensitive or contact sensitive, I think to myself "not yet". It can happen any time. You don`t want to think your child is not airborne or contact sensitive and then they have a reaction during an airborne or contact exposure at school.
Dd`s cap rast fell from 34 to 15 to 12. Maybe the fact that we avoid all airborne and contact situations helps.

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2007 - 1:10pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]I avoid all contact and airborne situations for dd..[/b]
Carefulmom, I'm curious how you do this. If I recall correctly, you homeschool, so that would avoid the school issue. How do you avoid all contact and airborne situations, though? To me, any time my child leaves the house, there's the possibility of a contact reaction (and like you pointed out, he could become airborne allergic at some point). I hope this doesn't come across critically, for that's not at all my intent. I'm asking to learn more about how to reduce this risk. I've read many of your posts that are so well-thought out and knowledgeable.

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2007 - 9:20pm
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ll
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 12:18am
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I don`t homeschool. And let me rephrase what I said. I avoid all KNOWN contact and airborne exposures for dd. Yes, there is always a chance of an unknown contact exposure (probably not an unknown airborne exposure though, since if someone were eating peanut products dd knows to walk away). So as far as a contact exposure, there is always the chance of residue somewhere, but any known contact exposure would be avoided. If another child ate pb, dd would know to make sure that the other child washed her hands before dd went near her. Dd does not touch objects in public places that could have residue and looks very carefully for crumbs before she sits somewhere. So I think she is extremely good at avoiding contact situations. I can`t think of any situation where she would have a contact exposure. I taught her how to avoid contact situations around age 6 or 7 and she is very careful. She notices crumbs that are the size of a speck of dust.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 12:27am
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personally(to kind of reply to Carefulmom) I do understand the idea about no exposures lessening reactions, and it is good her child's levels have come down. But then you have my kid, who has had many contact, inhalation and consumed exposures...and his numbers were 51, then 37.5, then recently 21.70....this is just so darn individual, it's crazy.
To be honest, in my opinion, I don't think exposures will make reactions worse the next time around. I know many will argue it will..but unless it is controlled exposure each and every time, there is no way of determining that the next reaction will be worse(because you don't know the level of exposure that will cause the reaction).
Consider the Duke study, those kids are given exact doses(exposures) of peanut powder....
I do think this is so VERY individual that some kids/adults will not react to inhalation or contact. I don't think that *they will*....they just aren't as sensitive. One of the moms who commented to me that her child would have been fine at the same basketball game we attended(where 170 people were eating peanuts) but that is maybe because her childs peanut caprats is just 1.7, her child does NOT have asthma....I think all these things come into play and that is what determines how severe a reaction will be.
With that said, my child is a 21.70, he does have asthma, he does have eczema...so I do think he is more sensitive then a child with a lower caprast, with no asthma and with no eczema.....it's so very individual, and I think that makes it even harder for the general public to understand, why one parent is so protective and the next parent isn't. I think the public generalizes these kids, so if one PA child *can* sit amongst people eating peanuts, then why can't all of them. Also, onemore thought...do I think because other kids aren't having reactions that I am doing something wrong....honestly I don't, I think I am doing everything I can, I do make a mistake here and there, but I am just as careful as the next parent....my kid is just really sensitive(because I do have kids that aren't as sensitive and they have no reaction history with other food allergies). IMO [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 12:56am
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This last post really reminded me of how different pa can be. Even though we don't go to the extent that most here do, my dd's rast are as high as her initial test after ana. reaction, and this is with no reactions (ingested, airborne inhaled etc).
I can totally see how one child with a low rast can react to minute contact and another with off the chart levels can have no reaction. I think this just makes pa even more frustrating to us.
We would be in that crown with peanut around us with no reaction, even though we would move asap. When I educate those that know dd or are introduced, that her lack of reaction does not mean that most others with pa are extremely sensitive to airborn/contact and not to go by by dd's pa.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:10am
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My point was really that just like any pa is has the potential for anaphylaxis, any pa has the potential to become airborne sensitive or contact sensitive. So when someone says their child is not airborne sensitive or contact sensitive, that just means that are not airborne/contact sensitive today. It is pretty much undisputed that the older someone is the more likely they are to have airborne or contact reactions. Just because has a child has not had one at age 6 or 8 after airborne or contact exposures does not mean they never will. The older someone is the more likely they are to become airborne or contact sensitive. So it is easy to have this false sense of security that if your child has had airborne or contact exposures and no reaction that they never will. But according to the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology, that is not the case.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:38am
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Quote:Originally posted by LisaM:
[b]I *haven't* seen anyone refer to this study when considering what accomodations to make for allergic children in schools. Why not? It seems like a significant one to me. I suppose that since the study was done on a *mice model* they can't say for sure that humans will be affected in the same way . . . but still, I think it should give people pause before assuming that contact reactions especially in children are not any big deal.[/b]
In addition to what's been posted above, there's a middle ground not acknowledged in that statement.
*My* allergist is aware of the study and *we've* discussed it. In the context of school accommodations. In the context of living. It gave *him* pause. It gave *US* pause.
And *we* (collective "we" namely both parents with one being a physician and our allergist/pulmonologist) still do *not* consider contact reactions "not a big deal".
Would someone kindly point me to the data showing that reduced exposure results in a lower CAP Rast score. Were there 'double blind' studies on this?
Would someone kindly point me to the data using CAP Rast scores as a factor in determining accommodations (or 'degrees of avoidance' or whatever we want to call it).

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:43am
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Carefulmom, I don't believe that I have ever said that after eight years with no reactions that my dd will never have a reaction of any sort ever again. There is always the possiblity but I beg to differ that it IS going to happen. There have been posts from others with pa that they have never reacted in over thirty years. I think what is true is that some might and some might not, as pa reactions are very different among those that are allergic.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 2:38am
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HUH?????? I didn`t say that you said it isn`t going to happen. I`m not sure what you are getting at. I am saying that it is well documented that the older the child is the more likely they are to become airborne or contact sensitive. Will every child become airborne or contact sensitive? Of course not. But it is more likely as your child gets older. Many children who have airborne or contact exposures with no reaction will later become airborne or contact sensitive. Who is to say whether it will or won`t be your child or mine. We can`t know that. Me, I will do everything possible not to increase that already present possibility.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 2:49am
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]Dd does not touch objects in public places that could have residue and looks very carefully for crumbs before she sits somewhere. So I think she is extremely good at avoiding contact situations. I can`t think of any situation where she would have a contact exposure. I taught her how to avoid contact situations around age 6 or 7 and she is very careful. She notices crumbs that are the size of a speck of dust.[/b]
I understand. I do. For example, Mariah covers her hands with her sweatshirt sleeve when opening things with a handle such as refrigerator doors. She usually pulls them down for the entire time she's in the school cafeteria. . . or so the monitors tell me.
But still, she touches balls, chairs, classroom text book and reference material, all kinds of objests that may have food residue. . . invisible to the eye. I'd venture to say that I wouldn't be surprised if it hapeened several times during her school day.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 2:54am
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But by this age, most kids are not bringing peanut butter to school, right? So food residue doesn`t necessarily mean peanut residue. Also, I thought at her school everyone has to use wipes after they eat? Do I remember wrong?

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 3:16am
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Kids bring PB to school to eat every day. There are around 800 kids in her school, so it happens every day I presume. At the beginning of this year, even Mariah's friends who ate at her table sometimes brought PB. Mariah says that it isn't happening now. But it can. It has. << shrug>> I'd bet [i]it will again[/i].
[i]Mariah [/i] washes her hands before eating.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 3:17am
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I have posted about my DD's sensitivity (ingestion, aerosol, contact)--we avoid many situations where aerosol/contact reactions will occur (No circus, no baseball games--to think my DD will never go to Fenway--it is a big deal (!!!!)). However, I'm not sure how a parent can avoid aerosol exposure---we moved like heck to get away from the peanut roasting machine in the BACK of a large grocery store--she was near it for maybe 2 seconds and 2 minutes later she had hives at the check-out. I wasn't even thinking of an aerosol reaction; I just didn't want someone with the free samples to get near her.
It happens....even with the best intention of avoidance. Well, I guess I could have called the grocery store that we went to weekly to inquire if they all of a sudden had a peanut roasting machine in there, but I didn't, and I don't call about those random events now. For a while, I didn't take her to the grocery store (any store) with me "just in case" and then I realized we do have to live our day to day lives.
It is so different for each individual and I think Carefulmom makes a valid point that you don't know when/if your child will react to contact or aerosol.
Nicole

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 3:25am
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Quote:Originally posted by Corvallis Mom:
[b]I agree... it is a very individual thing.
DD has had VERY few contact reactions because our comfort zone doesn't allow us to be in very many of those situations. But one recently (to pn, we are [i]fairly sure[/i] though the source was absolutely unclear and it is likely the amount involved was truly tiny...) involved both hives AND an asthma episode. Allergist agreed that epi seemed kind of extreme there-- but even Benadryl didn't take the edge off for almost 40 minutes. I wondered at the time.
Inhalation reactions tend to be more predictable-- though they certainly look scary enough. Asthma, red-rimmed eyes, sniffling, hives over exposed skin. I only count those as true "aerosol reactions" if the symptoms [i]resolve WITHOUT medication[/i] when we change DD's environment (by leaving). So we rarely medicate those. But contact rxns (for DD) never go away on their own.
Technically, both exposures lead to mildly anaphylactic symptoms, at least in DD. [/b]
Let me clarify, too-- we [i]do[/i] exercise [b]extreme[/b] caution whenever we leave the house. About touching objects, that is. We avoid places where pn residue [i]or[/i] aerosol exposure is likely. Yet even so, DD [i]regularly[/i] experiences problems. Particularly with inhalation triggered reactions, as these are truly unavoidable. (Given how cautious we are about where we go-- we're talking the doctor's office and bookstore, here, not Asian restaurants.)
Even so-- we experience a major contact reaction about twice a year. This has NEVER been to visible traces. Many of her aerosol reactions happen when there is no obvious source, either.
I can only imagine what would happen if she had overt contact. I am [i]guessing[/i] that it could be extremly serious, given her sensitivity and hx.
DD was not always this 'sensitive'-- at least, we don't think so. We used to get away with things we can't now. She became aerosol reactive around her third birthday (?) and markedly so by the time she was four or five. She's [i]always[/i] been contact sensitve.
As far as I can see, the only way for us to be more careful than we are would be to literally seal up the house and install a decontamination airlock, like in a BL-4 lab. I think that would be 'weird.' But I've thought about it, as you can tell! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 3:25am
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]Also, I thought at her school everyone has to use wipes after they eat? Do I remember wrong?[/b]
I had to go back and read her IHP. Here it is:
[b][i]Cleaning Procedures in common school areas[/b]
All students will wash their hands or use a cleaning wipe after eating in common school areas. After any food event in a common school area, tables and or desks will be sprayed with an approved solution and wiped down with a clean cloth. An adult will supervise cleaning. In the event that peanut butter or nuts was consumed in the common area, an adult will clean the desk or table. Custodians will clean the tables or desks in classrooms each evening.[/i]
I have a 504 meeting on Tuesday and I will ask if this is being monitored/enforced.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 4:09am
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"I hope I understood the topic of your post.... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]"
well, I didn't state the topic too clearly [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I think what I meant to write as the topic was on the lines of "contact reactions not considered serious?" i.e. contact reactions that are not systemic not considered serious?
It sounds to me that the immune system reacts differently with skin contact as opposed to contact with the gastrointestinal barrier. So while having kids ingest small, measured amounts of protein might lead to oral tolerance, it the same would not be true of skin exposure. . . in fact, the opposite might be true.
I read somewhere that there is some evidence that oral avoidance in combination with contact reactions *could* result in the worsening of the allergy. I can't for the life of me remember where (I've looked). But that section from Dr. Weisnagel's site that I quoted above supports that conclusion.
I'm not saying that *definitely* skin exposure = worsening of allergy. I'm just saying that that could be the case for some . . . and so I think doctors should not be too dismissive of peoples' concerns re: contact reactions even if the reactions are not severe. (And GailW, it does sound like your allergist is cautious in this regard.)
Chanda, I agree with your point that it is all highly individual and you can't really predict whether an allergy will worsen.
And, yeah, you can't guarantee that a child isn't going to come into contact with allergens . . . but as everyone here seems to agree, it is a good idea to avoid as much as possible without living in a bubble. It's always somewhat of a compromise.
While I started this thread after reading GailW's thread elsewhere, when I was complaining about no one mentioning that particular study I was thinking about official guidelines recently provided by allergists on dealing with allergies in the school setting. So, Gail, just to clarify, this thread has more to do with my own issues rather than with your particular thread . . .your thread just happened to remind me of them.
This is a Canadian-specific issue. . .
see: [url="http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/pages/default.asp"]http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/pages/default.asp[/url]
My issue is mainly with this page:
[url="http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/pages/default.asp?catid=19&catsubid=37"]http://www.allergysafecommunities.ca/pages/default.asp?catid=19&catsubid=37[/url] and with the link to the article entitled "Common Belief About Peanut Allergy: Fact or Fiction?"
The previous document which it replaces urged more caution when it came to contact reactions.
Of course, it isn't like this document gives people the go ahead to smear peanut butter all over in schools . . . on the contrary because of the risk of ingestion, the authors of this document urge caution.
What gets me is this document suggests that people like my sisters likely suffer from psychosomatic inhalation reactions.
And it minimizes the risk of contact reactions (when the *previous* document it replaces took the risk of severe contact reactions seriously):
"Some people worry that just touching small amounts of peanut butter will result in a significant or life-threatening allergic reaction. The researchers noted that a very small amount of peanut butter induced only a local reaction when touched"
I think what has happened is that study by Sicherer et. al. on inhalation and touch reactions has supplanted other studies and clinical reports. It was a controlled clinical study. . . but you can't really generalize for 100% of children based on such a small study.
I'm very interested in reading everyone's accounts of contact reactions. I've only had minor hives from contact . . but I've been concerned about one sister in particular (not the same one who required an epi last weekend). She doesn't have as many contact and aerosol reactions as Corvallismom's daughter, but she is very sensitive, and I've wondered if she should be using her epi for some contact reactions involving hives, itchiness all over, minor asthma, and possibly nausea (she's not sure if the nausea was because of anxiety during the reaction or part of the reaction). I'm somewhat relieved, Corvallismom, that your doctor has not suggested using the epi for contact reactions. My sister doesn't see an allergist . . .hasn't since she has been a small child. I wish she would go to get advice on when to take the epi . . . but she is opposed to the idea of going.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 4:59am
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that i know of my son has never had a contact reaction to peanuts (he has had many to milk- which is by far his less severe allergy). I have let him sit across from kids eating pb and watched him closely to make sure all was well. this has not happened often but on occasion. He has never been to places like a ball game though but has been on an airplane where I am sure there was peanut dust. I dont want to make him paranoid since he has never had a reaction of that sort I dont make a big deal about it but for myself I watch him closely. If there comes a time we have to worry about that I will but for now I am not going to worry excessively about it.
------------------
Lalow
James 5 yrs, NKA
Ben 4 yrs, PA and MA

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 6:04am
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Nicole, I think avoiding airborne exposures depends alot on where you live. Here in Southern California I have never seen anyone roasting peanuts. When I lived in North Carolina, I did see it. We don`t fly on airlines that ever serve peanuts. For example, we don`t fly Southwest even though they will refrain from serving peanuts on your flight if you are pa. Dd has never been to the circus or a baseball game specifically because we are avoiding airborne situations. It isn`t too hard to avoid airborne exposures here, if you just watch what people near you are eating. That is pretty much second nature to dd (11 3/4 years old).
I still remember Peg541`s post about her ds`s airborne reaction. He had not been airborne sensitive and then one day around age 14 or 15, he went into a classroom and had a reaction. He found out later that peanut products had been eaten in there earlier that same day. Peg, if you are reading this, correct me if I am saying anything that isn`t true. Anyhow, that story really impacted me. Just because dd has not had an airborne reaction, doesn`t mean she never will if there is an airborne exposure. I prefer to do everything possible to prevent them.
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 6:17am
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Originally posted by Lisa M:
"It sounds to me that the immune system reacts differently with skin contact as opposed to contact with the gastrointestinal barrier. So while having kids ingest small, measured amounts of protein might lead to oral tolerance, it the same would not be true of skin exposure. . . in fact, the opposite might be true."
This is exactly what I was thinking. I think the Duke study is really interesting, but it in no way indicates that contact and inhalation exposure does not worsen the allergy or increase the risk of a serious reaction with further exposures. The Duke study is a very controlled amount, by a controlled route of exposure. Totally different from what happens with contact and airborne exposures in the real world.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 6:55am
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I would like to see documentation that shows contact or inhalation reactions get worse over time, I know I don't know 1/2 of what I should requardig food allergies...but I've never once heard it gets worse the older you are(but you can prove me wrong, by all means [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]!!). I'm also curious about Peg's story...do you think her son came into contact(not knowing, from a desk or door knob etc...) that caused his reaction, not just someone had peanuts in the room the day before, is she sure he didn't touch something??? I am asking out of shear curiosity, that's all.
For me, I would never avoid a situation because I didn't know. I will attempt to take my kids places(ball games, the circus) and we have for many years....just because I had one bad situation at the recent basketball game, doesn't mean I will avoid them the rest of his life. I think there is a safe way to still enjoy life. We've been to baseball games, we just requested to sit an an emptier section(wiped it down etc...) and we had a blast! I would never keep that from my kids, they deserve to have fun and enjoy things other people do, we just need to take precautions. Every year we go to the circus, and I have NEVER sat by someone eating peanuts, ever(we've gone the last 7 years...since my oldest was age 1). That doesn't mean it will never happen, and when it does, we will deal with it. I've always told my son *I will try*...if he really wants to do something, *I will try*....if it doesn't work out, it doesn't work out, *we tried*. But I won't flat out tell him *no* because I am afraid, every situation has a little fear behind it, but he would be in a bubble if I let that fear run our lives. Anyways...just wanted to get that out [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 7:11am
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The documentation is all over the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology website and many of the FAAN newsletters as well. It is pretty much well accepted that pa is more likely to become airborne and contact sensitive as the person gets older. There is a ton of research showing this at [url="http://www.aaaai.org"]www.aaaai.org[/url] I love that site and spend 2 or 3 hours on it every couple of months.
Peg`s son`s reaction was airborne, not contact. If you do a search on this site, you can probably find some threads where she described it. The peanut candy was eaten in there earlier that day. He did not know about it, so it definitely was not psychosomatic or anxiety.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 7:39am
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even if it gets worse with age does it get worse with exposures?

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 8:07am
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]The documentation is all over the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology website and many of the FAAN newsletters as well. It is pretty much well accepted that pa is more likely to become airborne and contact sensitive as the person gets older. There is a ton of research showing this at [url="http://www.aaaai.org"]www.aaaai.org[/url] I love that site and spend 2 or 3 hours on it every couple of months.
Peg`s son`s reaction was airborne, not contact. If you do a search on this site, you can probably find some threads where she described it. The peanut candy was eaten in there earlier that day. He did not know about it, so it definitely was not psychosomatic or anxiety.[/b]
Thanks, I'll check out the site!! I just keep thinking, if my Jake is this sensitive at age 6...I'm in trouble if it does get worse as he gets older.
If I may, I wanted to share something my Pediatric Allergist commented when he was a speaker recently. He commented that parents often come to him terrorized because of a reaction their child had when pb just *touched* their mouth (or wherever...) how if just touching could cause their lips to swell, that ingesting it would for sure kill them. He said that is a myth. It *can* happen yes, but often times even when that same child ingests it, he may also just get lip swelling...I never thougth of it that way and wanted to see what you all thought. I guess it goes back to *we're all different* so we really can't forsee what reaction we'll have(or our kids will have) so we take it at that. It did make me think though, I know not all exposures are going to be deadly, but, like roulette....we just can't take that chance, and it is a shame we have to live in fear of it as well. Anyways....food for thought [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 8:08am
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It does not necessarily get worse as the allergic person gets older. If you look at studies done at the AAIA it will use words such as might, could etc. I have also looked at other sites as well. Once again, I have never seen any data that definitively answers, all individuals "will" get contact/airborne reactions etc as they get older. Some might and some might not which unfortuneatly seems to be the motto for pa.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 8:23am
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Are the PA adults on here also contact/inhalation sensitive...and are they worse then when they were younger?? Just curious....I was looking at that web site but havn't come across anythign yet.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 8:55am
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Quote:Originally posted by SkyMom:
[b]It does not necessarily get worse as the allergic person gets older. If you look at studies done at the AAIA it will use words such as might, could etc. I have also looked at other sites as well. Once again, I have never seen any data that definitively answers, all individuals "will" get contact/airborne reactions etc as they get older. Some might and some might not which unfortuneatly seems to be the motto for pa.[/b]
Studies show that 80% of the time, peanut allergy gets worse with age. This is well accepted by the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology and is also in the FAAN Newsletters. I`m not sure if you read my post above (from your post it looks like you did not), so I`ll repeat what I posted above:
"I am saying that it is well documented that the older the child is the more likely they are to become airborne or contact sensitive. Will every child become airborne or contact sensitive? Of course not. But it is more likely as your child gets older. Many children who have airborne or contact exposures with no reaction will later become airborne or contact sensitive. Who is to say whether it will or won`t be your child or mine."
From "The Peanut Allergy Answer Book" by Dr. Michael Young, which is pretty much the Bible on peanut allergy, "The children who become successful resolvers also had meticulous peanut and peanut product avoidance." Makes sense to avoid airborne situations and contact situations in order to improve chance of outgrowing.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 9:16am
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I tried to find the information that was mentioned as written by Dr. Michael C. Young to educate myself further re: pa. The first article that came up was from a public broadcasting system interview with Dr. Young. I found it interesting although I imagine quite controversial, that he mentions inhalation Not being a cause of reaction and wondered what others thoughts were?
[url="http://pbskids.org/arthur/parentsteachers/lesson/health/pdf/Binky_Peanut_Allergy_QA.pdf"]http://pbskids.org/arthur/parentsteachers/lesson/health/pdf/Binky_Peanut_Allergy_QA.pdf[/url]
[This message has been edited by SkyMom (edited March 03, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by SkyMom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 10:11am
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What I quoted is word for word from "The Peanut Allergy Answer Book" by Dr. Michael Young, Chapter 2 which is titled "Peanut Allergy 101". It`s pretty well accepted.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 10:26am
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First, I always try to avoid contact reactions. However, where would I live to 100% accomplish this, on the moon? Peanut residue is everywhere; the mall, doctor's offices, schools etc. I have said before I will not let my dd live in a bubble, she goes with me everywhere. Our way of doing things works for us, eight years with no reactions at all. However, I will get this book as one can never be too informed.
Carefulmom, I am really not in a battle with you here. I actually find it rather irksome when people go back and forth on a topic, that's not the most helpful and/or informative post for a supportive network.
[This message has been edited by SkyMom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 10:31am
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I've only gotten mild hives from what I assume is contact with trace amounts . . .doesn't happen all that often, though.
I have a very strong aversion to the smell of peanuts . . I seriously feel like gagging sometimes. But I don't think I react.
My siblings definitely do, however.
Sibling #1 used to *not* be contact or aerosole sensitive. Of the three of us, her allergies used to be the least constraining. But now she has more allergies + airborne reactions are a major issue for her . . i don't think that one could point to exposure to allergens as the issue here, though. A worsening of allergies (+ I'm pretty sure she is celiac now) was accompanied by a host of other health problems.
Sibling #2 -- has become more sensitive to contact and aerosole exposure as time went on . . .but she has always been sensitive. (As an infant, she broke out in eczema when my mom cracked an egg when she was nearby.)

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 10:42am
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Like I said above, I avoid all KNOWN contact and airborne situations. Sounds like you avoid all known contact situations also. So I am really not sure what you are getting at, like I stated a few posts up. There are some on this board who would let their child go into a situation with a known airborne or contact exposure such as a baseball game. Based on everything I have read, I prefer not to do that, in light of the fact that dd can become airborne or contact sensitive in the future. Of course, we don`t live in a bubble, but if you have taught your child well, he/she is probably avoiding contact situations on his/her own just by being aware of his/her surroundings. I know that my dd is.
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 11:16am
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]Nicole, I think avoiding airborne exposures depends alot on where you live. Here in Southern California I have never seen anyone roasting peanuts. When I lived in North Carolina, I did see it. We don`t fly on airlines that ever serve peanuts. For example, we don`t fly Southwest even though they will refrain from serving peanuts on your flight if you are pa. Dd has never been to the circus or a baseball game specifically because we are avoiding airborne situations. It isn`t too hard to avoid airborne exposures here, if you just watch what people near you are eating. That is pretty much second nature to dd (11 3/4 years old).
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited March 03, 2007).][/b]
Carefulmom-I live in New Hampshire---not many run-ins with peanuts. I have no idea why they had a peanut roasting machine in the back of the store; called the manager later and he said it was just a 'special event"--only for the weekend (I went on a Friday). Your DD could have walked away from that, as we did (my DD was just under 3 and in a cart, so I was able to push her away immediately)---she was still exposed and still reacted from the vapors released during the cooking. There is no way it was psychosomatic as she was too young to even know what the machine was (someone earlier mentioned psychosomatic, which I think can happen to older children/adults who have a fear of peanut/peanut smells, but at that point in my DD's life she was unaware).
We also do not go to baseball games, circus, etc..not because I am "scared", as Chanda said some are. I don't go because we have seen her react to aerosol exposure once, twice to contact exposure, and the risk is legitimatley high. 2 allergists have instructed us (their words) to "never take her to a baseball game or the circus", specifically. It isn't like I'm just scared of the unknown--I am cautious about the KNOWN. It has happened. There is no way I would stay at a basketball game with my child debating whether or not to give Epi. Different ways of dealing, but not because I am "scared". It worked OK for Chanda's son, but my DD is very aware that if a situation is risky, we (she) leave. By risky, I'm talking about blatant exposure with significant symptoms. No event is worth it to me, or to her. At age 5 she is quite understanding of her reality.
Her aerosol reaction was mild compared to what Chanda described, though we left within minutes of walking by the peanut roasting machine.
We also don't fly Southwest. We made that mistake once and then had to get off the plane with 4 other peanut allergic families because the plane was littered with peanuts. We paid for tickets to bring us home on a different airline.
It is absolutely a 'comfort zone thing'. I appear too loose to some, I'm sure, and too tight to others. It works (usually) for us and we are always changing things based on experiences and her age.
The allergists we have seen are also fairly certain that aerosol or contact reactions will not lead to anaphylaxis but they caution about these types of exposures for the reasons you have cited (repeated exposure). We no longer have hope she will outgrow her peanut allergy. We avoided so well until the incident at the grocery store and I can't help but wonder if that is why her #s soared (probably not but it is like mother's guilt of why did I eat so much peanut butter when I was pregnant with her...).
The contact reactions were just this past summer and they were within weeks of one another. Definitely not good [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
Nicole

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 11:42am
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Nicole, I agree with all of that. Plus at your child`s age, you are teaching your child right now the rules to keep her safe, just by the way you live. Your child is taking in all this information about how you handle various situations (airborne situation = leave immediately, peanut crumbs on airplane = leave the airplane,etc.). The day will come when you are not there, and your child will have to make these decisions and she will do it by all she learned by watching how you handle these situations. If you set an example of staying during an airborne or contact exposure, that is what your child will learn to do when you are not there. You may remember that I was hospitalized unexpectedly last summer and dd had to stay with friends who knew next to nothing about her pa (the friends who would have kept her were out of town, I am a single mom). So the point is dd at 11 told them everything they needed to do to keep her safe, even down to asking to read the dog food ingredients for peanuts. I never told her to read dog food ingredients, but she saw me do it years ago at someone`s house (we do not even have a dog). What your dd sees you doing now will influence how she handles situations when she is on her own. Actions speak louder than words, right?
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 12:01pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]From "The Peanut Allergy Answer Book" by Dr. Michael Young, which is pretty much the Bible on peanut allergy, "The children who become successful resolvers also had meticulous peanut and peanut product avoidance." Makes sense to avoid airborne situations and contact situations in order to improve chance of outgrowing.[/b]
Can you explain what that means? I'm not intending to be argumentative. . . truly. I'm trying to understand.
What is a "successful resolver"? Does that mean resolve symptoms quickly? Each time? Each [i]subsequent [/i]reaction resolved more quickly?
I don't understand that statement, and I need to see the science on which the statement is based.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 12:02pm
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Quote:
We also do not go to baseball games, circus, etc..not because I am "scared", as Chanda said some are. I don't go because we have seen her react to aerosol exposure once, twice to contact exposure, and the risk is legitimatley high. 2 allergists have instructed us (their words) to "never take her to a baseball game or the circus", specifically. It isn't like I'm just scared of the unknown--I am cautious about the KNOWN. It has happened. There is no way I would stay at a basketball game with my child debating whether or not to give Epi. Different ways of dealing, but not because I am "scared". It worked OK for Chanda's son, but my DD is very aware that if a situation is risky, we (she) leave. By risky, I'm talking about blatant exposure with significant symptoms. No event is worth it to me, or to her. At age 5 she is quite understanding of her reality.
Nicole[/B]
Well, when put this way, I feel bad for *trying* to give my son a *kind of normal life*. He really wanted to go to this game. So I just called him over to talk. I asked if he remember what happened that night at the game, "yes". I then asked him, "should we have left since you were having a reaction?" He said "no". "I really wanted to stay with my friends and watch the game".
I then asked "what reaction would tell him it was time to leave a situation"...he answered "if I started coughing or my neck was squeezing". I asked, "did that happen that night?"..."no"....(okay, I was just making sure for myself!!). He said "my eyes were itching really bad and my nose was running, that was all".
So when I talk with him and look into his eyes, and all he wants in the world is to be like the other boys and go to a basket ball game with his buddies.....how can I say no??? How can I crush his little spirit and say no??? This hurts me....I want to do the right thing, give him every chance I can for a normal life, *try* to go to these things(baseball, basketball, hockey, the circus etc...)and I hope that doesn't make me a bad mom. I am scared(sorry to emply you were) but I am, but I try not to let him see that. I try to be brave, I try to let him be a kid....I just feel I owe that to him.
I know, we are all different....but we all hurt the same too.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 12:12pm
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Gail, sorry it is totally out of context. He is referring to the allergy itself resolving. He is referring to those who outgrow the allergy are people who practiced meticulous avoidance. Of course, that does not mean that anyone who practices meticulous avoidance will outgrow. Wouldn`t it be great if it were that clear cut? He is saying that those who did outgrow the allergy (the allergy resolved) practiced meticulous avoidance. That is why I avoid airborne and contact situations for dd. Even though she will probably not outgrow, I want to increase her tiny chance as much as possible.
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 12:23pm
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Well-said.
I think that we as parents may be perfectly comfortable (as we should be) after a while with something less than "perfection" in terms of how [i]we 'protect' our kids and let them live in the 'real world.[/i]
But I am finding that more and more, I ask myself "How would I want DD to handle this?"
As her mom, I don't find the notion of her going somewhere that she is [i]likely[/i] to experience a problem to be acceptable... so I want to teach her [b]not to.[/b]
I'm teaching her avoidance that [i]I[/i] can live with in another ten years. Selfish? [i]YOU BETCHA.[/i] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] But I intend to eliminate [i]one[/i] source of future insomnia.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:03pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]He is referring to those who outgrow the allergy are people who practiced meticulous avoidance. Of course, that does not mean that anyone who practices meticulous avoidance will outgrow. Wouldn`t it be great if it were that clear cut? He is saying that those who did outgrow the allergy (the allergy resolved) practiced meticulous avoidance. [/b]
Does he cite a reference? study(ies) ? If you post the reference, I'll try to find and post the study here.
Thanks for looking. I appreciate it. I no longer have that book. . .

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:20pm
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While looking for information I came across this article that says outgrowing allergy may be up to 50% of pa. It also indicates that this was for those that had low test levels. My dd's levels have never went <100 (with no exposures, even though she goes everywhere), I know that this is not for her but maybe will be news for others. Sounds great to me!
[url="http://www.aaaai.org/patients/advocate/2003/fall/fall03.pdf"]http://www.aaaai.org/patients/advocate/2003/fall/fall03.pdf[/url]
[This message has been edited by SkyMom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:40pm
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Dd`s allergist also told us about that study. He said that the 20% referred to all people with pa, and the 50% is for those who strictly avoid.
Gail, there are tons of references at the end of the book, but no references specific to specific statements in the book.
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited March 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:45pm
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Finally, common ground. Did your allergist say that the 50% could also be those with previously high levels?

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 1:51pm
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I don`t think he mentioned anything about the cap rast levels in that discussion. Really it was just that if we successully avoided exposures, her chance of outgrowing was 50%. The 20% was old news, and that new studies showed that if someone successfully avoids their chance is 50%. He wrote a letter to the school about this as well, that the school must avoid situations where she would have airborne or contact exposure in order to give her the best chance to outgrow. I had a thread on it maybe two years ago.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 2:48pm
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Chanda (and everyone)-I know how much it hurts for children to 'be different', to 'miss out', but it happens to children for multiple reasons in our society (not just PA)---how many kids with lower socioeconomic status feel left out because they don't have what their peers have (clothes, vacations, eventually cars--or even the basics like a home or full bellies---or a family)...or kids miss out just because their parents have different rules (curfew, checking up on parties, no sleepovers, etc.). I honestly do not feel guilty when my DD needs to miss out because of safety issues. I wish it wasn't the case, but that is life; it is that reality she needs to be prepared for. I want my DD to be able to make her own fun/her own alternative experiences as she grows. My DS (no allergies) might feel like he misses out on some freedom his peers have. It isn't that I am numb to the difference or untouched by her sadness, but this somewhat matter of fact attitude that DH and I have, has lead to her having less pity for herself. She often finds alternatives to unsafe situations. She is still young (5 1/2) so I'm sure this issue will come about more often as she gets older.
Last year, I took her to see Annie at a theater in Boston. We had front row seats, she was really enjoying the show...then the people next to us...and behind us...opened peanut butter candies after intermission (another live and learn experience as I stupidly assumed there was no food allowed inside the actual theater--it is a historic building and I just thought the lobby would be an obstacle with food during intermission, but not inside the theater, itself). The smell of peanut was pervasive and I chose to hold my DD and stand in the back and watch the show. She was OK with it--she still saw the entire show. I didn't make a big deal about the peanut smell; we just moved. As I held her and watched the show standing in the back..I had tears rolling down my cheeks in that dark theater. I thought about how awful it is that this what her life has to be, at times. She said something to my husband when we saw him after the show about our seats not being safe--so she did "get it".
I want her life to be normal, as well. But, 'normal' has a huge spectrum regardless of food allergies. I attempt to balance her safety issues with all of the other important aspects of her development.
Managing food allergies is so individual. I hope (pray) that we are preparing her to handle compromising situations in a way that will keep her safe AND confident in her decisions. Keeping her at an event until her throat started to feel like it being squeezed is not an option. I also don't want her to freak out and run if she sees a candy wrapper on the ground--she just knows not to touch the wrapper. We spend time at the grocery store looking in the nut aisle---I show her (packaged nuts) peanuts in a shell, peanuts in a can/jar, etc. so she knows the peanuts aren't going to jump out at her AND she can recognize the dangerous food should it ever be in close proximity.
History of reactions plays a key to my comfort zone (anaphylaxis once at 14 months and I am doing everything to avoid a repeat scenario or anything close to it).
Sorry to ramble.
Safe thoughts to all,
Nicole

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 3:17pm
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I haven't read all the way through this thread as I need to hit the sack. But I would like to say that I Do NOT agree with the statement that a contact reaction is not something to be as concerned about. My 11 yo pa son has had more contact anaphalactic reactions (5- 3 of which required epi and trip to ER and the other 2 should have) than he has had to ingestion! I worry just as much about contact/inhalation as I do injestion.
Just my .02,
Valerie

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 11:13pm
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]I myself don't think contact reactions(ie being hives) are too serious....if it just stays hives. The weird thing about allergies is that reactions can go from hives to worse, and you never know until it is happening. A few examples....my 1yr old was kissed by my daughter(with milk on her lips) and she got hives. No big deal, it just stayed hives, gave Bendryl and then they were gone.
But...my 6yr old recently had a contact reaction while ata basketball game. It wasn't the hives that scared me, it was the runny nose, horribly itchy eyes(he couldn't open them to see), he was scared and crying...for about 15min I debated using the Epi. I had him in the bathroom, washing every inch of hands, arms and face off in the sink. Eventually he was able to open his eyes again...and slowly(over a 30min period) the Benedyrl kicked in and his symptoms were gone......all from contact or inhalation contact at a basketball game(we were probably 50ft from people eating peanuts, but I think the chairs were covered in dust etc...).
So I can see(just hives) not being a big deal, but then what happens when it goes beyond hives....and the fact that you never know until it's happening, is what doctors(and parents) should be concerned with.
So for me, I am nervous about contact reactions. I know several parents that are not, because nothing happens when their kids are *around* it. (I had 2 parents tell me their PA child would have been fine in that situation at the basketball game). I think this just proves how VERY different these allergies are.
I hope I understood the topic of your post.... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[/b]
I'm entering this conversation late, but I've read from the bottom up.
Before I reply in general, I wanted to reply to Chanda specifiically about this. If you are are going to be going to places like this, take a jersey knit crib sheet (or two or three) with you, and after you clean the seat, put it on the seat. You can buy them in interesting colors.
We don't go to events like this too often. For the most part, it's just not worth it. A few weeks ago I had to take DS to a performance at an arena for a work-related event (he couldn't stay with DH that afternoon, and a babysitter was out of the question). This arena is pretty much just used for performances, so people don't buy peanuts as much as other food. No reaction, but we only stayed as long as we had to. And no one ate peanuts around us, or it would have been to heck with the entire thing, of course.
DS wants to go to the rodeo, and it's just not worth it to me. We went a couple of years ago, and here in Houston, it's in this huge football size arena, and we have to sit in nosebleed so we can move from people eating peanuts, and I've never been quite that far from all the rodeo action in my life. Besides, the sponsor is a [i]wine[/i] company, and not even a Texas one at that. This is no real rodeo anyway. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
But . . . when we have gone to an event, I've made sure I've wiped down the backs of our seats. When people shell peanuts, they throw the shells down, and the dust hits the back of the seat in front of them. THen I go wash my hands w/o touching anything.
Really, it's just too much stress, and more importantly the risk is so high. DS is too big now to carry down the arena steps to avoid stepping on peanuts. We don't want peanut on his shoes--peanut dust/oil in his room, on his carpet, etc.
A contact reation [i]is a big deal for me[/i]. There--I've responded here. I don't think it's because I now have my own LTFA that I think this, but perhaps I appreciate it more. Chanda, you said it best--you just don't know when it's going to escalate. And the fact that it could have an effect on the future is really scary.
I do know a child who went into anaphylaxis after coming into contact with pb at a children's gym. It must have been on the equipment from a child who had eaten pb before comng to the previous class. Her mom had to use an Epi.
It can indeed get serious.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 11:18pm
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]I don`t think he mentioned anything about the cap rast levels in that discussion. Really it was just that if we successully avoided exposures, her chance of outgrowing was 50%. The 20% was old news, and that new studies showed that if someone successfully avoids their chance is 50%. He wrote a letter to the school about this as well, that the school must avoid situations where she would have airborne or contact exposure in order to give her the best chance to outgrow. I had a thread on it maybe two years ago.[/b]
School thread? I looked for your thread and couldn't find it. Would you please raise it when you have a chance?
I have never come across this study, and I'm feeling remiss. If you could help me find it I'd be grateful.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2007 - 11:57pm
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Would anyone be interested in writing a letter asking this precise question to aaaai? Chandra? On that website, there is an "ask the expert" option where a question is answered by an "expert" (e.g. Woods, Burke)
Something like,
[i] "I am the mother of a 6 year old with positive skin test to X and Cap Rast score of X. My child has a history of X. [/i]
[i]Recently we were at a sports event where peanuts were served. My child did not ingest peanuts directly, but we sat approximately 50 feet from people who had them. I do not know if peanuts had been previously consumed by people who sat in the seats we were in, nor do I know if the seats had recently been cleaned. There were no visible peanuts in the immediate vicinity where we were sitting. [/i]
[i]I observed my son experience a runny nose, swollen and itchy eyes. I did not see any hives. After washing well with soap and water in the bathroom, I treated him X ml of benadryl adn left the event. His symptoms resolved completely after 30 minutes.[/i]
[i]While the event in question is resolved, I am concerned about the affect that such contact/airborne exposures may have on my son. Can you please tell me how contact and airborne exposures affect the chances of him outgrowing his peanut allergy? What are the relevant studies on this? Should we be advised to avoid all situations such as this event where peanuts are present? " [/i]
I have use the "ask the expert" service before, and received a written e-mail response after about 3 weeks. They did not publish my question/answer on their website. (It was regard the reliability of different labs CAP Rast testing.)
What would you think about asking this question, and then posting the response you receive?

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