College-bound son

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 12:40am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

My son is going to attend a small university 83 miles East of our home.

We had our first all day visit there. The purpose was for him to sit in on classes and for us to start raising their awareness of PA.

My son has had ingestion and airborne reactions, just three in his 18 years but they were enough.

We sat in the cafeteria and met with the nurse and the director of food services.
One memorable quote from the food guy.
"Well at least peanuts in the air won't bother him."

When we told him that peanuts in the air would INDEED bother DS the guy nearly passed out.

They bake all of their own baked goods. No set recipes, everything is freshly done. This would be heaven for someone who is not PA but in our case it is terrifying.

The nurse and food services director were extremely concerned and interested in any information we could give them.

His 13 years in school were a cake walk compared to this. I understand it is not so easy for others. He always went to small private schools where it was easy to be safe. He needs to branch out, to meet people, to make contacts. His college years should be the start of the best years of his life.

[This message has been edited by Peg541 (edited June 19, 2003).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 1:03am
synthia's picture
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Joined: 10/05/2002 - 09:00

Hay peg
It will be ok.
You might want to start with some books on the subject.
And maybe some storys on other kids and what has happened.
I feel the same way,my DD is only going to be in preschool.
And I am scared to death to.
Give them has much info. has possible.
Educate all.
We are here for you.
My heart goes out to you.
Stay strong.
Love this site
synthia

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 1:28am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Possibly there can be a point where disabilities become disabling? As a person (myself)who DOES qualify (non PA related) for "Disability" , ie: as defined by SSI, I understand your feelings and frustration.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited February 05, 2003).]
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited February 05, 2003).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 1:35am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]Possibly there can be a point where disabilities become disabling? [/b]
MommaBear, I don't get it. I guess it would be disabling if he could not go into the cafeteria. Is that what you mean?
Peg

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 1:57am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

[url="http://www.eeoc.gov/ada/adahandbook.html#whatada"]http://www.eeoc.gov/ada/adahandbook.html#whatada[/url]
please explore the link, you may find it interesting.
I noted with interest the "Reasonable Accommodation and Undue Hardship" section (you must scroll down).
Often I hear the words "reasonable accomodation" but infrequently "undue hardship". ADA is a two sided coin. There are valid expectations on both sides.
Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy of any of the links I post.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited February 05, 2003).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 1:59am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

Thanks mommabear, I'll take a look, and thank you to Synthia. I appreciate any information and support.
Peg

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 2:04am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

[url="http://www.ada.gov/childq%26a.htm"]http://www.ada.gov/childq%26a.htm[/url]
please look closely at
"3. Q: What are the basic requirements of title III?"
note the words "fundamental alteration".
Please understand by no means am I being un-empathetic.
I will note the entire link is very very very interesting and possibly addresses many issues related to ADA
Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy of any of the links I post.

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 2:42am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

All I can offer is support and encouragement and the belief that you and your son have what it takes to pave another road for the rest of us embarking on the journey in years to come! Warmest regards,

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 2:54am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

So far, one day after our meeting I can very safely say we will not be asking the college to make any "fundamental alterations" to their cafeteria set up. This would be too much. I do think that with PA on the rise they might have to do this eventually and my son will be responsible for raising their level of awareness.
He can choose to sit as far away from the food prep as he can get. He can even sit outside since we have decent weather 300 days of the year.
Peg541
[This message has been edited by Peg541 (edited June 19, 2003).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 2:59am
Annemarie's picture
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Joined: 03/11/2002 - 09:00

Hi Peg,
The more time I spend on this website, the more fortunate I feel about my allergy. Wow, airborne allergies are terrifying...
Is this the only set-up the school has? I know a lot of universities in Canada have apartment-style residences with no meal plans at all. The students are responsible for all their own food. Sometimes these residences are reserved for upper-year students, but I am sure they would make an exception in your son's case.
Or he could live off-campus. I know that's the last thing I wanted to do when I went away to school, but I may have felt differently if I was terrified of the cafeteria!
Speaking of which, my cafeteria was terrible for allergies, it was 100% up to me to make sure I was eating safe foods. I didn't go near the table with the peanut butter vat. (Two whole years without toast!) Some of the staff was very good and understanding, others would poke around in the dish and say "well, it doesn't look like there nuts in it." They got better with time though.

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 3:11am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

Thanks Annemarie,
For sure my son will be 1000% responsible for what he chooses to eat.
My main concern is that he is able to access the safe healthy foods he needs to eat.
I think we'll be OK, it is going to take lots of work starting today.
Peg541

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