chinese

Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 5:08am
lalow's picture
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Joined: 03/24/2004 - 09:00

my grandmother wants to take us all out for chinese tomorrow (we are visiting her). My son is 17 months. I will take food for him like I do to all restaurants as there is never anything he can eat (soy, peanut, egg and milk). But would you take him at all? he has never had any problems with contact or airborne allergens to this point.

Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 9:32am
Lovey's picture
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Joined: 03/22/2004 - 09:00

It's not recommended:
"Avoid Chinese or other ethnic foods and buffet restaurants where spoons go in and out of various bowls that may contain nuts or seeds."
This is from kidshealth.org. Check this link for more information:
[url="http://kidshealth.org/teen/diseases_conditions/allergies_immune/nut_peanut_diet_p2.html"]http://kidshealth.org/teen/diseases_conditions/allergies_immune/nut_peanut_diet_p2.html[/url]

Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 11:38am
pgrubbs's picture
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Joined: 10/27/2003 - 09:00

My DD had an anaphylactic reaction in a Chinese restaurant due to either cross contamination of her food or the table itself. We don't go near them now.
I am craving Chinese- trying to learn how to make it myself.

Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 1:26pm
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

I have a different opinion from the other posters. I would take a 17 month old as long as I had only safe food for him to eat. You could also ask that no food with obvious nuts be ordered to cut down on the possibility of a contact reaction.
Broader comfort zone here, obviously. My nine year old pa and tna dd has never reacted in that type of situation.
Good luck, you do have to follow your heart, of course.
Miriam

Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 3:45pm
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

I am like California Mom, as I also eat in some Chinese restaurants (but not all). But I always check very carefully to ensure that the food will be safe. Many Chinese restaurants (in Toronto anyway) do not seem to use peanuts that much, although you must be extra careful as there are some places that use peanut butter in some products (ie: to seal egg rolls, etc) but I don't eat at those places. But I do understand why many people would be hesitant, as due to the language barrier (in many restaurants the staff may not be totally fluent in English), it may be difficult to be certain of the usage of peanuts in the menu. I eat at some, I don't eat at some - a case by case basis. The key is to be prepared and be careful and do research and if you have doubts, go elsewhere.
I do not eat at Thai restaurants though, as peanuts or peanut sauce are very prevalant. No Thai or Vietnamese food for me!

Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 4:13pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pgrubbs, when I was a kid, many years ago, one of the take-out foods that my parents loved to get was Chinese Food. I do miss it.
The closest I have come to replicating it is fried rice and now the chicken with vegetables stir fry.
However, what I haven't done, is check out any Chinese food restaurants in the town that I live in (and I have been here for almost 3 years) to see if any of them would be okay for us to go into.
We did go to one in the one horse town we lived in and I thought I asked all of the *right* questions, etc. We ordered something very basic (I think we may even have ordered Canadian food) and we were okay. But, after that, we learned that someone else, anaphylactic to shellfish had had a reaction there.
I found the problem there was really one of communication. The people, who were Chinese, did not really know what I was asking them or I wasn't quite sure that they knew for sure what I was asking them or how serious an incorrect answer may have been for us.
So, no, we don't do Chinese Food and like pgrubbs, I do miss it a lot.
I do remember after my son was diagnosed, but before I learned that much about PA, we still did have it ordered in and I think tree nuts were the problem rather than peanuts (and he is PA only).
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 4:15pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Oh, and yes, definitely a "comfort zone" thing.
There is a Chinese Food restaurant around the corner from me and I have thought a couple of times of going in and speaking with someone to see if it would be safe for us to eat there.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sat, 06/12/2004 - 9:21pm
Sandra Y's picture
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Joined: 08/22/2000 - 09:00

I think the original poster is saying that she wants to take her 17 month old to a Chinese restaurant. He will not be eating the Chinese food, he will be eating his own safe food from home.
We do this all the time. Our son is 8 and he doesn't eat any Asian food from restaurants. We live in Asia, so we always bring his food and he eats that while we eat Korean or Chinese food. We do not order any food with obvious peanuts, but still he doesn't try any of our food (and I have found stray peanuts in Korean food, even though it's not a common ingredient).
Whenever we go out to eat, which is frequently, we always make sure my son has something to eat that he considers a treat. He brings his favorite food from home or McDonalds food, or a special dessert from home.
This has always worked well for us and I hope it will continue to be safe. We have never had any allergy problems from just being in an Asian restaurant.

Posted on: Sun, 06/13/2004 - 12:29am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Sandra Y., always good to see you posting. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Now, I understand more clearly (I think I was posting last night after a really bad nightmare that I had to get up and "break").
See, I'm one of those people that doesn't like to be around other people eating peanut products, so it really would depend on the restaurant. If there were a lot of peanut dishes or an obvious smell, I wouldn't be okay taking my 8-1/2 year old son in there, even if he did have his own food.
I think that's what I meant about it being a "comfort zone" thing.
But then, I'd be the same way if we went out to the restaurant for breakfast and there were a lot of people eating pb, not at a Chinese food restaurant.
I would go into the restaurant, yes, with the safe food for your son, and just see how comfortable you feel with your surroundings. If you're going to be on pins and needles all of the time that you're there, what's the sense? But, if it's really just like any other restaurant, why not?
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sun, 06/13/2004 - 6:02am
lalow's picture
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Joined: 03/24/2004 - 09:00

We went. It all went well. I didnt try to order anything for Ben. He sat in his high chair and ate the food I brought for him and never even looked at the food on the table. I did not bother to ask any questions because I knew he couldnt have any of it anyway. Everybody ordered some dishes to share and so since some of them had nuts their was cross contamination everywhere. I couldnt order him anything even without the peanut allergy because of his other allergies. I didnt notice any obvious peanut dishes on the menu or sauces etc. More cashews than peanuts.
------------------
Lalow
James 2yrs NKA
Ben 17 months PA,MA,possible EA, and SA

Posted on: Sun, 06/13/2004 - 9:33am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

lalow, glad to hear that you went and everything worked out well. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I can't actually remember peanuts in a Chinese food dish I've ever ordered either, not even a peanut sauce. It would be like what you posted, more tree nuts to worry about than actual peanuts.
There was the point that erik made about some places using pb to glue their egg rolls.
Odd thing as far as I'm concerned, but whatever.
Anyway, I'm really pleased that things went well.
I actually do remember before my son had his first anaphylactic reaction (and he is PA only), we had a giant feast one year, I believe to celebrate my MIL's birthday, after Jesse's diagnosis, and it was Chinese food.
I think, for some reason, I was able to ask all of what I thought were the *right* questions and Jesse actually ate the food, or as much Chinese food as a 2-1/4 year old would eat.
It's really only since I left Toronto and moved to small towns that I haven't felt comfortable trying.
Tonight, we did our own chicken and veg stir fry thing which is only new to us within the last 8 months or so.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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