Child sneaking pb cracker in classroom!

Posted on: Thu, 08/19/2004 - 9:46am
MQriley2's picture
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Post deleted by Renee

[This message has been edited by MQriley2 (edited August 23, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 08/19/2004 - 11:42am
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Joined: 05/06/2003 - 09:00

Did this other parent know it was a peanut-free classroom and that pb could kill your child?
That part always infuriates me.
[This message has been edited by StaceyK (edited August 19, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 08/19/2004 - 8:53pm
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Joined: 05/25/2004 - 09:00

Yes, the entire class was sent a letter during the first week regarding my son (the one from FAAN). They are not allowed to ever eat in the classroom, guess this little girl was just being sneaky. She really was a sweet little girl, but I really don't think first graders really understand "could die from" unless they have had to deal with it before.
It is one of those learning experiences, both for us and the teacher. For the life of me, I can't figure out how she snuck it without the other teacher seeing her. Their bags are no where near them.
Teacher says she is going to address it again with the parents at open house on Thursday.
Renee

Posted on: Fri, 08/20/2004 - 12:40am
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

I know you said you are O.K. with the threat about taking away your ds's recess. I hope you don't mind me saying that I don't like it. I would rather she give him a small "reward" of some type for coming to her.
Just my .02
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

Posted on: Fri, 08/20/2004 - 2:14am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

I agree with California Mom. A treat rather than a punishment for coming to the teacher if your son has any PA concerns in the classroom.
My son finished Grade 3 in June and I found out quite early in the year (December month) that he was not speaking up for himself in the classroom re PA (and probably never has). A girl that had been in his class in Grade 1 was actually quite vocal on behalf of my son and his allergy, each and every time the teacher didn't "get it".
I think that because Jess already has an Epi-belt strapped around his waist, a MedicAlert bracelet on, and everyone knows he's the PA child in the classroom, it must be very difficult for him to speak up.
I know that in SK, when his teacher asked him to speak about his allergy, because he was not prepared beforehand, he was totally freaked out and didn't want to do so.
But then in other years, when he has been prepared to speak about his allergy, he's been fine. He has also agreed to do the two newspaper articles that have been done on him and his PA.
As far as the child sneaking food in the classroom - how many children are in the class? How could the teacher (any teacher) miss a child eating in a class where one is not supposed to eat?
Did the class (the children) have any education re PA? like shown a video or something?
So, would this child have eaten the snack normally in the cafeteria? Is that okay?
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 08/20/2004 - 4:55am
MQriley2's picture
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Being a daycare provider, I am all for praises vs. threats, but praises are not working with my son. I also do not feel that giving him a treat everytime he takes responsibility for this issue is fair for anyone else in the room. This is something he has to live with forever and if taking away something will make him do it, then I do not have a problem with it at this time.
It was time to get serious. We have had several..several..nice talks offering rewards for his responsibility that had no affect on him. The reward didn't mean anything to him when it came to telling on someone or interrupting the teacher.
As far as how many kids in the room..way to many. It is a long story and the teacher is NOT happy with it. They have 23 kids when they usually have 14 or 15. The kids and staff had many meetings about the allergy issue. The kids saw the elephant video and discussed his allergy to the fullest. The kids have to wash their hands everytime they enter the classroom. This was not a snack she was eating, it was part of her lunch that she didn't dump out after lunch. I bring all snacks.
I have no clue how this person, whom I don't kow who was in there, didn't see the child eating. Unless she was monitoring two classrooms at once. They have a door that goes in between the classrooms and it is possible the teacher was standing in between watching both rooms. I haven't been able to find out who it was yet.
Again, I appreciate your opinion on the praise vs. punishment issue as I practice this method everyday. Although it was the teacher that said this, without warning to me, I had to agree that it was time to get serious.
Renee

Posted on: Sun, 08/22/2004 - 2:56pm
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Quote:Originally posted by MQriley2:
[b]The teacher talked with her and then told the mom to not send any pb with her again.. I know she was thinking the best for my son, but I think this may have bad repercussions in the end. She also got real serious with my son and threatened to take away his recess if he didn't come and tell her things that had to do with his epi or allergy.[/b]
Ok, she had a 'talk' with girl & her mom but got 'real serious' with your son.
Did she threaten to take away recess from the little girl if she ate in the classroom again???

Posted on: Sun, 08/22/2004 - 9:34pm
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Joined: 05/25/2004 - 09:00

I should have known better than to post this on here. I couldn't "explain" the entire conversation or it would have taken up like three pages. I forgot that every word gets disected in here. For this reason, that is why I try not to post opening posts unless I need info. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] Not being mean, just hard to explain emotion in print.
As far as the serious part went, my son was smiling and laughing when she originally started talking to him so she told him..no she was serious..stop laughing. I am deleting this post, sorry..not trying to be negative just wanting to explain an unexpected pb incident.
Renee

Posted on: Mon, 08/23/2004 - 12:56pm
California Mom's picture
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MQriley2, I'm not sure why you took such offense at people's comments. I don't think anyone said anything mean spirited in any way.
Take care, Miriam

Posted on: Mon, 08/23/2004 - 11:50pm
MQriley2's picture
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I wasn't taking personal offense to anyone's comments. It just seemed no one was "getting" at what I was trying to say. It seemed that comments were going in a direction that talked bad about my teacher and that is not where I was going with this story. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] Not everyone, it just seemed that this would start to get ugly and I don't like to get involved with "ugly". lol
The entire story was just to let everyone know about an incident that you might not think would happen in a peanut free classroom.
Renee
[This message has been edited by MQriley2 (edited August 24, 2004).]

Posted on: Tue, 08/24/2004 - 2:26am
California Mom's picture
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O.K., I'm glad you explained. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I guess for me, I do sort of "expect" these things to happen in a pf classroom. I've seen it, too. So, for me it comes down to: "how does the teacher handle it?"
It's totally fine with me if you have a different opinion than I do about how a teacher should handle these things.
I think it is quite reasonable, however, that if you post about a situation it will spark discussion, especially if there is disagreement about how to handle it.
You know your son, I don't. You know the teacher, I don't. You know the entire situation, I don't.
I was just giving my .02 from what I understood.
Take care, Miriam

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