Child \'almost dies\' after taking store sample

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 9:39am
Jana R's picture
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[url="http://www.wfaa.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/localnews/tv/stories/wfaa0602..."]Child 'almost dies' after taking store sample[/url]

[i]Child 'almost dies' after taking store sample

01:05 PM CST on Friday, February 10, 2006

By DEBBIE DENMON / WFAA-TV

WFAA-TV
Ashley Roman said her son, Joey, had an allergic reaction to a nut shell.
Also Online

Debbie Denmon reports

Joey Roman is like most two-year-olds: fascinated to get his hands on anything.

But what he got his hands on at Whole Foods Market recently was anything but fun.

"They were terra chips and I took a sample, my husband took a sample, and we let Joey reach over and take a sample," said Joey's mom, Ashley Roman. "Within a couple of seconds, he started gagging."

Roman said she first thought Joey had a chip lodged in his throat.

She said the problem turned to be a pistachio shell he had grabbed from the chip tray.

"Within a minute or so my husband said, 'my baby can't breathe,'" Roman said. "I looked over and you couldn't recognize his face."

It was so serious, Joey had to be rushed to the emergency room at Children's Medical Center.

"I was afraid he was going to stop breathing; I was afraid they were going to have to do a tracheotomy; I was afraid his heart was going to stop," Ashley Roman said.

E.R. doctors said Joey had a severe allergic reaction called anaphylactic shock.

"It's rare but it certainly can cause one to die," said Dr. Robert Wiebe of Children's Medical Center.

The Romans had no idea until this incident their son was allergic to nuts.

"All you could see were chips - you couldn't see pistachio shells," Ashley Roman said. "They were mixed in at the bottom of it."
WFAA-TV
Samples are offered in many stores.

The family wants Whole Foods Market to pay more than $7,000 in medical bills.

The store's insurance offered $1,400 - an amount Roman said is roughly their out-of-pocket expenses.

"The sample trays are still sitting out there, unmonitored and unattended, even though they know that this was something somebody almost died over this," she said.

Whole Foods issued this statement:

"Reported allergies to nuts, particularly in children, are on the rise for reasons that are not yet clear. Because the mother of the child says she missed work to take her child to the doctor for a potential nut allergy from sampling nuts at one of our stores, we offered to reimburse her for the time she lost from work."

According to the City of Dallas food protection and education division, grocery stores like Whole Foods can offer samples, but the samples must be covered, and tongs or napkins should be in place for customers to use to pick up the sample food.

"When food is on display to be sampled, it needs to be protected from consumer contamination," said Ashan Khan, . If it is ready-to-eat food there shouldn't be bare hand contact with the food," said Ahsan Khan, division manager of food protection and education.

The Romans say they don't want to sue - they just want an apology and they want to send a message.

"If people want to sample... beware it's a risk... and it's a big one," Ashley Roman said.

They're just glad Joey is alive and well.[/i]

The family is asking WFM for $7,000 - the article doesn't really explain how Whole Foods would be held responsible since the family didn't know the toddler was nut-allergic and they allowed him the samples. But I'd be curious to know more.

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Jana

[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 9:55am
toomanynuts's picture
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Why would the samples have nut shells on the bottom of a chip sample. I would sue just for that ha! Never take a sample and never let DD near one either. Gross!

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 9:59am
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I think that's all the more reason that WFM should be responsible. If the mother knew that her son was allergic, she probably would not have allowed him to have the sample. There is always the chance that someone unknowingly might eat from a sample plate before knowing that they have a particular food allergy (especially young children). It is up to the store to make sure that sample dishes are clean. The food available should also be labelled (in my opinion).

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 10:11am
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I just don't think folks who know they have life-threateing food allergies sample food at all from store displays. Since no one knew this child had allergies, no one could have prevented this from happening. Yeah, it'd be great to have things clearly marked with ingredients but how on earth could they prevent cross contamination? If stores could provide samples from unopened packages to those who have known food allergies, GREAT! but since this wasn't a concern when the family went in the store, then I can't tell from this article why it's WFM fault this child had an allergic reaction? JMHO
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Jana
[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 1:04pm
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Anonymous (not verified)

Jana, I agree with you. The parents didn't know the child was allergic. In fact, it's almost a positive thing that the child tried the sample and they found out that he is TNA. That whole personal responsibility thing I think. They allowed the child to have a sample - not knowing that their child was allergic to anything.
How did all of us find out our children were allergic? If Grandma gave the kid pb on toast one day and it was found out the child was PA because of that - jeez, could we sue Grandma?
Here, in Canada, in the grocery stores that I shop in that have samples, there is a very clear sign with two things - an allergy warning and also that a parent has to be with a child for them to be able to sample something.
My children are allowed to sample things that are PA safe.
Even if they did know that their child was TNA, is it not the parents' responsibility to ask if there were any tree nuts in the product before they allowed the child to have a sample?
If the situation is as the article reads, I think the parents should be thanking the store rather than suing them.
It's a strange world we live in.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 2:05pm
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Boy, wish there was just a tad more info on this one. My guess is that the problem is that the nutshell should never have been in with the chips in the first place. I would be upset by that. I couldn't imagine trying to hold the store responsible if it had been the chips themselves that the child had reacted to, but it really sounds like either the sample tray had been reused or somebody's trash had gotten into it (UGH!). That's a health problem either way. I'm glad the little boy is okay, and now his parents will be better informed about how to keep him safe in the future.
Lori

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 8:08pm
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I think the angle should change, what about the hygeine factor? where the shells meant to be there as part of the chips?
somehow I dont think so.
What are the food safety regulations for food samples in stores?
sarah

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 12:04am
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The sample trays at Whole Foods (at least the ones in Dallas and Houston that I've seen ) are two tall for most two-year olds to reach alone (so I'm wondering if they were holding him???). And they're closed--with a dome over them (they can remain open, though). I think WF usually takes precautions is what I'm saying.
No--a pistachio shell should **not** have been in there. That little boy is lucky to be alive---unknown FA or not. Even if someone weren't allergic, it could have choked someone. That's a liability thing on WF part and $1700 or $7000 is just part of the playing the game here. But they're a good company. A wonderful company. And this stuff just happens sometimes.
Samples? I admit I have let DS take fruit samples at WF before--ones on top. But then I thought about cross contamination possibilties and put an end to that.
This is an awful story, but at least this little boy turned out okay. The WF locations I can think of in Dallas are all pretty close to hospitals. Good thing.

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 12:54am
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I agree that it is difficult to judge this situation without all the info---maybe the boy's parents had held off on feeding him nuts on account of family medical history.
Yesterday I was at WholeFoods in Toronto, and I noticed 1) the bulk nuts in the produce section were removed
2) when I stopped by the meat counter (which I stayed away for awhile on account of the fact that a sausage which according to the ingredients label contained peanuts was next to the chicken....but they got rid of the sausage because of this)....anyways, as I was saying, when I stopped by the meat counter there were two employees discussing the changes they were making to the labelling of the ready-made meat products (in a separate case from the other meat products). "flavours" and "spices" are going to be specified. After reading about this story in Dallas I'm wondering if the heightened concern about allergies in the Toronto store is related----maybe Whole Foods is looking more carefully at things. I do think that this company is allergy-aware anyways, but it is good to see them become more so. I wish they would get rid of the peanut butter making machine---I haven't had a reaction when walking past it, but the stench is nauseating when the machine is in operation. I avoid the section if the machine is in use or hold my breath!

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 1:44am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Lisa M., what part of Toronto is there a Whole Foods store in? Is it a health food type store?
To me it sounds like one and I'm always more cautious with my PA son in a health food store than I am at a regular grocery store because of usually the more peanut/nut factor.
The sample counters at the two grocery stores where I encountered them, Sobey's and ValuMart look quite clean to me. They're also separate from the food being sold by a bit, so whatever is being served as a sample wouldn't have a stray pistachio shell suddenly hit the table. I don't know.
So, I guess the ? is, was the pistachio nut part of the cracker?
I don't know, it's pretty clear to me, in Canada, from the labeling at the stores I've gone to, that if I sample, I'm sampling at my own risk or allowing my children to do so. My guy tried vanilla milkshake last week - I okayed it (had read the label) and I'm sorry, if he had a reaction after that, it would have been MY responsibility, IMPHO, not the store's.
For the most part, when there are samples to be had, my PA son can't have any - "may contain". My daughter absolutely loves to sample different things and she is allowed to if she is with me without her brother and if there are no direct peanut products involved (or tree nuts). So, even her, with NKFA, I accept responsibility for what I am allowing her to sample.
Perhaps it's something I'm missing. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 3:02am
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My tna pa son had an anaphalactic reaction to mislabelled chocolate chip cookies that I bought from Whole Foods. It was before I stopped buying anything from bakeries....learning curve, I guess...but at the time they were labelled as chocolate chip, and I read the label twice, no mention of nuts. Turns out they had put WALNUT COOKIES in the box. My son took one bite, said "mom, these have nuts...." the rest is history. He swelled up, threw up, started to have trouble breathing...one epipen and a trip to the ER later, we never, ever shop at Whole Foods. They were very apologetic, paid all our med bills, did employee training, etc. But I still won't step foot in a Whole Foods. The bakery manager told me about her son's life threatening allergy to beef...still I never buy baked goods and the thought of Whole Foods...yikes!
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mom to Ari(5) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (8), mild excema

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 6:48am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

In the grocery store to-day, they had samples of different flavours of a new cracker. Since this thread had been raised, I thought I'd have a look at the conditions of the sample counter (if you'd even call it a counter). It was extremely clean. The samples were given in little plastic cup things so the person working the counter has to hand the sampler the little cup (I didn't notice gloves - doesn't mean there weren't any). Then, there is a garbage bin right beside the counter to throw your little cup thing in.
The crackers to-day were "may contain" and so we didn't sample them, but as far as cleanliness, the counter was spotless.
There is a notice saying that if you KNOW that you have any food allergies, to please let the sample person know. And the one about children having to be accompanied by an adult.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 8:36am
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CSC,
Whole Foods is in Yorkville--on Avenue Rd. north of Bloor (within walking distance from the subway). It's a health food store--but a huge one. More like a grocery store run by a large corporation with a social conscience. And if one can describe a grocery store as swanky, this store would fit the description.
It is absolutely spotless--although there are more nuts around. There's what I refer to as the 'wall of death' (a large section of open bin nuts in closed containers)--it is at the end of all of the aisles so it is easy to avoid. I get some of my staples at WF---I can get packaged brown rice flour (Oak Manor) for a decent price (much cheaper than El Peto flour) and they order Oak Manor millet for me. It is much easier to find prepackaged products which are free of major allergens. On the very rare occasion I buy bread there--the only bread I can eat (due to multiple food allergies) is Ener-G bread and the only two places where I have seen it is at Whole Foods and the Specialty Food Shop at Sick Children's hospital. (Ener-G bread is quite expensive, which is why I hardly ever buy it--one knows that one's allergies are out of hand when bread is a 'luxury' item.) They do have a wide variety of products for people who have special dietary needs---there's a large Gluten free section, they sell Enjoy Life products, etc. (but currently, Enjoy Life cereal and cookies can be found for a better price at The Big Carrot on the Danforth.) So I shop there but try to stop by during quiet times of the day when the peanut butter machine is less likely to be in demand. And I quicken my pace if I'm ever anywhere near the 'wall of death.'
[This message has been edited by LisaM (edited February 11, 2006).]

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 10:22am
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Quote:Originally posted by LisaM:
[b]I do think that this company is allergy-aware anyways, but it is good to see them become more so. I wish they would get rid of the peanut butter making machine---I haven't had a reaction when walking past it, but the stench is nauseating when the machine is in operation. I avoid the section if the machine is in use or hold my breath![/b]
I don't think they are allergy aware at all. I think they pretend to be but are not. Any store with a peanut making machine is not allergy aware, IMHO. In the store near me (in New Jersey) the pb machine is unmanned & customers use it; there is a nut roasting station; there is an aisle of bins with nuts, rice and wheat.
They have all these products that are allergen free but a person with contact or airborne sensitivities can die in their store. How is that considered allergy aware?

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 12:21am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

[quote]Originally posted by Jana R:
[BThe family wants Whole Foods Market to pay more than $7,000 in medical bills.
The store's insurance offered $1,400 - an amount Roman said is roughly their out-of-pocket expenses.
.............
The Romans say they don't want to sue - they just want an apology and they want to send a message.
[/i]
Why do they say they just want an apology, when what they want is $7,000.
I never eat at those sample tables - but I do allow my son to (he has no [b]known[/b] food allergies). Coud something happen to him? Yes - same as eating at school or at home or at a friend's place. And if it happens, it is the fault of no one.
Adding to what csc said about the sample tables - when food is set up there is always an adult there serving it. They wear gloves (probably latex) and put individual servings into a container. My only complaint is that once I saw a container given to a child (about 9 years old) without a parents permission. I quietly pointed out to the woman working there that the reason she shouldn't is some children have food allergies - and pointed to the *allergy warning* sign.

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 1:22am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Lisa M., thank-you for telling me where Whole Foods is in Toronto. Okay, so it's a health food store.
So that means that the whole chain we're talking about is a chain of health food stores?
I have personally found, since PA diagnosis, that navigating a health food store and buying things from it is a lot more difficult than buying them at the grocer (if you can find the same things at the grocer to begin with).
I loved your "wall of death" reference.
I go to one health food store once a month and I scoot in and out, even if I have the kids with me. We're in the supplement aisle and the food is quite separate from us.
But, if they were offering samples at a health food store, I probably (please note probably) would not let me PA son try one because of the increased peanuts/nuts in the store to begin with. A cross-contamination thing.
However, I have not been to Whole Foods in Toronto and I'm getting the sense that if it's quite large and things are separate, that it may very well be similar to shopping at a grocery store, except for the pb making machine and if the samples were set up the same way they are in the grocery store - away from other food; clean; same warnings; I'm not sure that I wouldn't allow my son to sample something. It would be a more "iffy" situation for me.
And again, if I allowed my son, with known PA, to sample something in what I consider to be a health food store (more high risk than the grocer, IMPHO), then it would be *my* responsibility if something should happen to him, not the store's.
Anna Marie, you extended the point further really well - our children eating at homes of other children; school; etc. Now, with the school, if they knowingly fed my PA child something peanut-y, that's a whole other story, isn't it? But, if my non-PA child eats something in her classroom and has a reaction, again, it's not the fault of anyone because we don't know that she has any FA's (she doesn't, but meaning she might have developed one I don't know about).
Even with the school, with the breakfast program, each child was asked to have their parent sign a liability waiver - that the parent understood that their child was eating food provided at the breakfast program, blah blah blah.
Is it not my personal responsibility if I allow my children to eat anything other than something that is made in my home?
If I prepare something in my home, that I am led (through labeling and/or a manufacturer call) to be peanut free, and something happens to my son, is it my responsibility or do I deal with the manufacturer?
If all they want is an apology, they should take the $1,400.00 that I feel was graciously offered.
Based on what I have read here only, I think what they are doing is ludicrous.
If the parents didn't know the child had an allergy, how can a store be held responsible for him having a reaction?
Or, do I contact the makers of Eatmore and say, hey, I fed my son an Eatmore bar, or bits thereof, and he had a PA reaction and that's how I found out he was PA, but I'm holding you liable? 8+ years later?
Each time any of our PA children have a reaction are we going to sue the manufacturer? I guess I'll be contacting Duncan Hines and Kraft/Boca. Their labeling said the product was safe to eat. They maintained after the reaction (not anaphylactic) that the product was, indeed, safe. It wasn't.
Now, when it is blatant, as in one case I am thinking about that has been posted here - yes, by all means.
I just don't think it's right, obviously.
I also think it minimizes or has the potential to make thing more difficult for people with allergies should they have a reaction. Can't explain that one without more coffee, but I know what I mean.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 2:36am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

csc, I don't know why when you mentioned Eatmore, it reminded me of what happened to me many years ago.
I knew I had allergies, but I had absolutely no idea what they were. Well, I suspected peanuts - and I had suspected wheat. (I was reacting to bread and pizza and many other foods with wheat in them - not realizing they also either had sesame seeds or had trace amounts.)
Well, we went into a little deli-type store in a mall and I bought a sesame snack. (It's kind of like peanut brittle only full of sesame seeds.) That was what caused my most severe ever reaction.
The following day dh went back to the mall to check the ingredients in the sesame snack. The guy working in the store got upset with him - he had taken out a pen and paper to write down the ingredients and the guy told him he had to buy it. DH says it almost killed my wife - I'm not buying it. He chased dh out of the store. I mean he physically ran to the customer side of the counter and chased him out swinging something at him. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] He was hollaring "I sell good food - my food not bad, not make people sick." When dh got out of the store (into the mall part) there was a policeman eyeing him. So, dh went over and explained the situation. His wife had an allergic reaction and almost died. He wanted to see what the ingredients in this product was, but didn't want to buy it. The policeman escorted him into the store and allowed him to look at the package.
btw, we never ever considered sueing anybody. Nobody did anything wrong. If I had [i]known[/i] I was allergic to sesame seeds I wouldn't have eaten it. But, if I didn't know, how could I expect the guy selling it to know?

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 5:52am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Oh my soul, Anna Marie. How sweet of your DH though to go to get a list of ingredients. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I guess the fellow thought he was in some kind of trouble. I wonder what the heck he came at your DH with from behind the counter. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]
At least the officer was able to help your DH get a list of the ingredients.
I guess I should consider my forays into ingredient label reading pretty tame. I mean, no one has ever bothered me. I may get strange looks, but that's about it.
But no, not knowing you were sesame seed allergic, you wouldn't sue the makers of the sesame seeds snacks (I really loved those btw, haven't found a "safe" one I don't think).
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 7:03am
LisaM's picture
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Ellemo, In a world where a lot of people don't get the basics of allergy management, I see "allergy-awareness" as a spectrum. I consider a company to be allergy aware company representatives don't look at me as if I had two heads when I ask them about manufacturing, cross contamination, etc. In general, I find that people who observe dietary restrictions for religious or ethical reasons tend to be more understanding about allergies. And because Whole Foods takes a detailed look at the conditions under which food is grown and manufactured, they get the allergy thing to a certain extent. Also, they really care about what customers think and would be likely to make changes if problems are pointed out to them. Since a lot of vegetarians/vegans would be likely to shop at whole foods, I don't think they will be getting rid of the "wall of death" anytime soon--it would be nice, but I don't see it happening. I do think that they *should* get rid of the peanut butter making machine because when in action it puts quite a lot of peanut protein into the air I would think. But I don't really expect people to "get" the inhalation reaction thing just yet. I don't think that all allergists are on board with this one (although they might be concerned about the concentration of peanut dust on a plane), and based on what I've seen on Anaphylaxis Canada's website, I don't think that they are either. Someone mentioned on this site too that the FAAN doesn't believe that inhalation reactions to peanut dust occurs. So I don't write off a company if *they* don't get it. I do think that things are changing for the better, but it will probably take some time and more research and, unfortunately, some more near fatal reactions.
CSC wrote: "I loved your "wall of death" reference."
Thanks! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I was thinking of the song Nancy Griffith sings on the album "Other voices too" called the "Wall of Death" LOL.
There is one store in Toronto where you can probably get supplements without having to walk briskly past a row of nuts---the Big Carrot on the Danforth (on the north side of the road just west of the Chester subway station). The supplement store is in a separate building from the grocery store--I've never been in the supplement store (maybe this is called 'the dispensary'?), but I would guess that all the nuts would be in the grocery department.
[This message has been edited by LisaM (edited February 13, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 7:55am
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AnnaMarie, I don't agree that no one did anything wrong. I'd consider a store employee chasing a customer out of the store doing something wrong. Not something to be sued over, but definitely wrong.

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 1:49pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Lisa M., thank-you. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] The Big Carrot is a bit far away for me (I live in the west end). I go to a store at Runnymede and Bloor and we're actually not close to the food when we're looking at the supplements anyway (I just go in for one particular one) because the food is behind another aisle of supplements (if that makes sense). It's a really tight little store and I don't like going in there to begin with because it's always busy.
I prefer the other health food store at Runnymede and Bloor, but it doesn't have the supplement I buy. Also, out of the two, the tight one is the only one where I have felt relatively okay about buying bulghar wheat.
I actually wouldn't mind checking out Whole Foods, but would probably prefer to do it without the kids because of the "wall of death".
Jimmy's Mom, I think Anna Marie meant that it was no one's fault that she had been sold a sesame seed thing that she was allergic to because she didn't know she was allergic then, KWIM? As far as the guy chasing her DH, well, I'm sure the officer would have dealt with that at the time if he felt there was a problem?
I wonder if erik has been into Whole Foods - it's not that far from where he is in Toronto.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 1:00am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Quote:Originally posted by Jimmy's mom:
[b]AnnaMarie, I don't agree that no one did anything wrong. I'd consider a store employee chasing a customer out of the store doing something wrong. Not something to be sued over, but definitely wrong.[/b]
That had nothing to do with causing my anaphylaxis. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
At first the guy thought my husband was trying to steal this little candy. Then, when dh tried to explain, they guy thought he was threatening to sue him. He spoke english, but not well enough to understand the details of what dh was saying. When dh went back in with a police officer, he thought he was going to be arrested. Personally, I do feel bad about the whole thing. And remember - he chased, but he never actually hit dh. If he had intended to I'm sure he would have. It all boiled down to a language barrier.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 2:57am
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I have complained numerous times at the Whole Foods our family frequents. The store sells a brand of tortilla chips, which is close enough to the ground in which my child could reach, that were baked in peanut oil.
When he was 2 there were many different displays in which the chips were served, and he reached out and grabbed one. Thankfully I snatched it out of his hand before he put it in his mouth and raced with him to wash his hands.
I complained to management, but to absolutely no avail.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 3:48am
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My take on this:
WF puts out samples. Is that legal? I guess so, though, maybe not 'cleanly', but 'legal'
Did the parents know about the FA's? I dont think so.
Was there a sign that says 'May contain nuts' -- Was it necessary? Was there a shell 'by accident'? Would it have matterred?
If the parents KNEW of a PA, and didnt see a sign, and the child had a reaction, thats one thing...
If the parents did NOT know of a PA, didnt see a sign, didnt care about a sign, and the child reacted thats another story.
I give samples all the time (of cookies, cheese, etc..) to Meghan, without concern. Doesnt SEEM to have ANY FA's. No nut propducts for her though.. chips? Yes.
If I gave her a chip, from the store, that 'DID' contain nuts, would she react? I dont know. If she did? Is it MY fault? Im more knowledgeable in FA's, given our history.
Does that matter?
Theres a LOT to this case IMO.
Innocent until proven guilty, right? Negligence?
Did WF label correctly? Do they NEED to? Legally? Ethically?
I like Whole Foods... I see their PB machine... thats an aisle that has NOTHING for us, so we dont go down it. Easy.
Jason
ETA::::::
I hope the parents find us and are able to get the support they need!
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]
[This message has been edited by jtolpin (edited February 14, 2006).]

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 4:59am
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here's a quick take on one aspect of this.
let me preface this by saying, i am a very anti-litigious, anti-trial lawyer, libertarian. that being said, this incident happened after 1/1/06, the date by which all food packages had to be labeled for the 8 major allergens. jump to the legal definition of "negligence"..."The failure to use reasonable care. The doing of something which a reasonably prudent person would not do, or the failure to do something which a reasonably prudent person would do under like circumstances. A departure from what an ordinary reasonable member of the community would do in the same community."
was whole foods negligent? one could make a case that the "reasonably prudent individual (or business)" should be labeling samples clearly for the 8 major allergens. therefore, whole foods was negligent by not letting the public clearly know what was in the samples. (however, mitigating their negligence in this particular case is the fact that the parents had no idea that the child was allergic and probably would have tasted the sample anyway).
just a quick thought.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 5:44am
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Right.
So in a 'sue-ing point of view', it would be better to know your child is pistacchio allergic, then not, correct? That way you have a better 'case', if you will?
Because if you KNOW is allergic, and they don't label something, it's THEIR fault, for not labeling, sort of?
But if you don't KNOW he's allergic, then why would you think twice about giving it to him?
Very interesting case. Very appropriate, I believe.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 9:09am
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Quote:Originally posted by AnnaMarie:
Adding to what csc said about the sample tables - when food is set up there is always an adult there serving it. They wear gloves (probably latex) and put individual servings into a container. My only complaint is that once I saw a container given to a child (about 9 years old) without a parents permission. I quietly pointed out to the woman working there that the reason she shouldn't is some children have food allergies - and pointed to the *allergy warning* sign.[/B]
Anna Marie--I don't know if you're specifically referring to the sample tables at WF, but I know for a fact that not all sample tables at WF are manned. Some are (usually the ones toward the back of our Dallas store when we lived there)--but the ones with chips and and chips/salsa at the front of the store and the fruit in the produces usually aren't. And this incident took place in Dallas.

Posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 12:15pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

McCobbre, I can't speak for Anna Marie as I don't know if she's been to Whole Foods here in Toronto (I didn't even know we had one [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img] ). My posts (and I believe her's) were based on the sample counters at grocery stores. I deal with a Loblaw's offshoot (ValuMart) and Sobey's. These stations are always manned (or personed [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) and there are very clear allergy warning signs up and also the sign about children needing to have an adult with them.
I would have to check out the Whole Foods downtown (and will one day) to see if they have a sample counter or not and what it is like.
But I'm pretty sure that Anna Marie was speaking about what sample counters we've come across in our regular grocers.
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Sat, 02/18/2006 - 9:11am
LisaM's picture
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Mistey wrote: "When he was 2 there were many different displays in which the chips were served, and he reached out and grabbed one. Thankfully I snatched it out of his hand before he put it in his mouth and raced with him to wash his hands.
I complained to management, but to absolutely no avail."
Okay, well *that's* not allergy aware! I'm surprised that they wouldn't change the display--I would have thought that you would have been doing them a favour by pointing out what is a dangerous situation.
--------------
CSC--I live in the west end too. But it takes me about the same amount of time to get to the Big Carrot as it does to get to Whole Foods since I take the subway everywhere--Whole Foods is a lot closer geographically, but it is further from the subway station.
BTW, there's a very very small organic market on the weekends in that restaurant at the south end of High Park (they sell much more produce during the summer). They sell *some* Oak Manor (prepackaged) organic grain products for the most reasonable price I've seen.(I called Oak Manor once, and they do not have any nuts in their plant). 1kg of rice flour I think is something like 5.99 there--it is 7 something at Whole Foods. All the other flours are less expensive--they would definitely have whole wheat flour, but I can't remember if they have bulgur wheat.
[This message has been edited by LisaM (edited February 18, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 02/19/2006 - 12:32am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

McCobbre, sorry I was very unclear in my post. As csc clarified, I was talking about grocery stores in Toronto. It's like that in all the stores I've been in. Everytime I see a sample table, there is someone working at it, and it's been this way for a few years now.

Posted on: Tue, 02/21/2006 - 2:53am
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I think that Whole Foods is not a good place to shop for people with food allergies. I will not even take my son in that store. I buy produce and meat there and that's it.
There are nuts EVERYWHERE in that store!!

Posted on: Tue, 02/21/2006 - 6:59am
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I agree that Whole Foods is not the most PA-friendly place. They, like most health food stores, still seem to cater to vegetarians. Most vegetarians use a lot of nuts/peanuts to get their protein. So most of the products contain nuts/peanuts, or are may contains. My mother works at Whole Foods, and her store has little that PA DS can have. But even worse is the small local health food store my SIL works at. I walked up and down every aisle three times and found only one food that wasn't labeled as may contains--that was soynut butter.

Posted on: Sun, 03/05/2006 - 3:15pm
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Quote:Originally posted by LisaM:
[b]Ellemo, In a world where a lot of people don't get the basics of allergy management, I see "allergy-awareness" as a spectrum. I consider a company to be allergy aware company representatives don't look at me as if I had two heads when I ask them about manufacturing, cross contamination, etc (edited here for brevity purposes) Since a lot of vegetarians/vegans would be likely to shop at whole foods, I don't think they will be getting rid of the "wall of death" anytime soon--it would be nice, but I don't see it happening. I do think that they *should* get rid of the peanut butter making machine because when in action it puts quite a lot of peanut protein into the air I would think. But I don't really expect people to "get" the inhalation reaction thing just yet.[/b]
Let's forget about the inhalation reactions, for a moment. What about contact reactions or the reactions of allergic children who may touch some PB or nuts which are in the store and put their fingers to their mouths or eyes. It is certainly something that could happen, & is much less controversial among professionals, most of whom are in agreement of the problems of cross-contamination.
I would prefer a company that looked at me with two heads when I ask about allergens. At least I know where I stand. Whole Foods, IMHO, is dangerous because they talk the talk but they don't walk the walk. They really don't get it but they think they do. Their stores are not safe for anyone with nut allergies.
Personally, I don't care if they have the nut bins, roasting stations or PB maker; I understand that there is a market for this. But I am very upset that they present themselves as allergy aware. They are clearly not.
[This message has been edited by ElleMo (edited March 06, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/06/2006 - 2:28am
erik's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by AnnaMarie:
[b]McCobbre, sorry I was very unclear in my post. As csc clarified, I was talking about grocery stores in Toronto. It's like that in all the stores I've been in. Everytime I see a sample table, there is someone working at it, and it's been this way for a few years now.[/b]
Yes, every sample station I have seen in grocery stores has had a person working at it. It may be a "Toronto" (or Ontario) specific thing though.

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 9:55am
toomanynuts's picture
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Why would the samples have nut shells on the bottom of a chip sample. I would sue just for that ha! Never take a sample and never let DD near one either. Gross!

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 9:59am
MimiM's picture
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I think that's all the more reason that WFM should be responsible. If the mother knew that her son was allergic, she probably would not have allowed him to have the sample. There is always the chance that someone unknowingly might eat from a sample plate before knowing that they have a particular food allergy (especially young children). It is up to the store to make sure that sample dishes are clean. The food available should also be labelled (in my opinion).

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 10:11am
Jana R's picture
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I just don't think folks who know they have life-threateing food allergies sample food at all from store displays. Since no one knew this child had allergies, no one could have prevented this from happening. Yeah, it'd be great to have things clearly marked with ingredients but how on earth could they prevent cross contamination? If stores could provide samples from unopened packages to those who have known food allergies, GREAT! but since this wasn't a concern when the family went in the store, then I can't tell from this article why it's WFM fault this child had an allergic reaction? JMHO
------------------
Jana
[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 1:04pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Jana, I agree with you. The parents didn't know the child was allergic. In fact, it's almost a positive thing that the child tried the sample and they found out that he is TNA. That whole personal responsibility thing I think. They allowed the child to have a sample - not knowing that their child was allergic to anything.
How did all of us find out our children were allergic? If Grandma gave the kid pb on toast one day and it was found out the child was PA because of that - jeez, could we sue Grandma?
Here, in Canada, in the grocery stores that I shop in that have samples, there is a very clear sign with two things - an allergy warning and also that a parent has to be with a child for them to be able to sample something.
My children are allowed to sample things that are PA safe.
Even if they did know that their child was TNA, is it not the parents' responsibility to ask if there were any tree nuts in the product before they allowed the child to have a sample?
If the situation is as the article reads, I think the parents should be thanking the store rather than suing them.
It's a strange world we live in.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 2:05pm
anonymous's picture
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Boy, wish there was just a tad more info on this one. My guess is that the problem is that the nutshell should never have been in with the chips in the first place. I would be upset by that. I couldn't imagine trying to hold the store responsible if it had been the chips themselves that the child had reacted to, but it really sounds like either the sample tray had been reused or somebody's trash had gotten into it (UGH!). That's a health problem either way. I'm glad the little boy is okay, and now his parents will be better informed about how to keep him safe in the future.
Lori

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 8:08pm
williamsmummy's picture
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I think the angle should change, what about the hygeine factor? where the shells meant to be there as part of the chips?
somehow I dont think so.
What are the food safety regulations for food samples in stores?
sarah

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 12:04am
McCobbre's picture
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The sample trays at Whole Foods (at least the ones in Dallas and Houston that I've seen ) are two tall for most two-year olds to reach alone (so I'm wondering if they were holding him???). And they're closed--with a dome over them (they can remain open, though). I think WF usually takes precautions is what I'm saying.
No--a pistachio shell should **not** have been in there. That little boy is lucky to be alive---unknown FA or not. Even if someone weren't allergic, it could have choked someone. That's a liability thing on WF part and $1700 or $7000 is just part of the playing the game here. But they're a good company. A wonderful company. And this stuff just happens sometimes.
Samples? I admit I have let DS take fruit samples at WF before--ones on top. But then I thought about cross contamination possibilties and put an end to that.
This is an awful story, but at least this little boy turned out okay. The WF locations I can think of in Dallas are all pretty close to hospitals. Good thing.

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 12:54am
LisaM's picture
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I agree that it is difficult to judge this situation without all the info---maybe the boy's parents had held off on feeding him nuts on account of family medical history.
Yesterday I was at WholeFoods in Toronto, and I noticed 1) the bulk nuts in the produce section were removed
2) when I stopped by the meat counter (which I stayed away for awhile on account of the fact that a sausage which according to the ingredients label contained peanuts was next to the chicken....but they got rid of the sausage because of this)....anyways, as I was saying, when I stopped by the meat counter there were two employees discussing the changes they were making to the labelling of the ready-made meat products (in a separate case from the other meat products). "flavours" and "spices" are going to be specified. After reading about this story in Dallas I'm wondering if the heightened concern about allergies in the Toronto store is related----maybe Whole Foods is looking more carefully at things. I do think that this company is allergy-aware anyways, but it is good to see them become more so. I wish they would get rid of the peanut butter making machine---I haven't had a reaction when walking past it, but the stench is nauseating when the machine is in operation. I avoid the section if the machine is in use or hold my breath!

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 1:44am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Lisa M., what part of Toronto is there a Whole Foods store in? Is it a health food type store?
To me it sounds like one and I'm always more cautious with my PA son in a health food store than I am at a regular grocery store because of usually the more peanut/nut factor.
The sample counters at the two grocery stores where I encountered them, Sobey's and ValuMart look quite clean to me. They're also separate from the food being sold by a bit, so whatever is being served as a sample wouldn't have a stray pistachio shell suddenly hit the table. I don't know.
So, I guess the ? is, was the pistachio nut part of the cracker?
I don't know, it's pretty clear to me, in Canada, from the labeling at the stores I've gone to, that if I sample, I'm sampling at my own risk or allowing my children to do so. My guy tried vanilla milkshake last week - I okayed it (had read the label) and I'm sorry, if he had a reaction after that, it would have been MY responsibility, IMPHO, not the store's.
For the most part, when there are samples to be had, my PA son can't have any - "may contain". My daughter absolutely loves to sample different things and she is allowed to if she is with me without her brother and if there are no direct peanut products involved (or tree nuts). So, even her, with NKFA, I accept responsibility for what I am allowing her to sample.
Perhaps it's something I'm missing. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 3:02am
anonymous's picture
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My tna pa son had an anaphalactic reaction to mislabelled chocolate chip cookies that I bought from Whole Foods. It was before I stopped buying anything from bakeries....learning curve, I guess...but at the time they were labelled as chocolate chip, and I read the label twice, no mention of nuts. Turns out they had put WALNUT COOKIES in the box. My son took one bite, said "mom, these have nuts...." the rest is history. He swelled up, threw up, started to have trouble breathing...one epipen and a trip to the ER later, we never, ever shop at Whole Foods. They were very apologetic, paid all our med bills, did employee training, etc. But I still won't step foot in a Whole Foods. The bakery manager told me about her son's life threatening allergy to beef...still I never buy baked goods and the thought of Whole Foods...yikes!
------------------
mom to Ari(5) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (8), mild excema

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 6:48am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

In the grocery store to-day, they had samples of different flavours of a new cracker. Since this thread had been raised, I thought I'd have a look at the conditions of the sample counter (if you'd even call it a counter). It was extremely clean. The samples were given in little plastic cup things so the person working the counter has to hand the sampler the little cup (I didn't notice gloves - doesn't mean there weren't any). Then, there is a garbage bin right beside the counter to throw your little cup thing in.
The crackers to-day were "may contain" and so we didn't sample them, but as far as cleanliness, the counter was spotless.
There is a notice saying that if you KNOW that you have any food allergies, to please let the sample person know. And the one about children having to be accompanied by an adult.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 8:36am
LisaM's picture
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CSC,
Whole Foods is in Yorkville--on Avenue Rd. north of Bloor (within walking distance from the subway). It's a health food store--but a huge one. More like a grocery store run by a large corporation with a social conscience. And if one can describe a grocery store as swanky, this store would fit the description.
It is absolutely spotless--although there are more nuts around. There's what I refer to as the 'wall of death' (a large section of open bin nuts in closed containers)--it is at the end of all of the aisles so it is easy to avoid. I get some of my staples at WF---I can get packaged brown rice flour (Oak Manor) for a decent price (much cheaper than El Peto flour) and they order Oak Manor millet for me. It is much easier to find prepackaged products which are free of major allergens. On the very rare occasion I buy bread there--the only bread I can eat (due to multiple food allergies) is Ener-G bread and the only two places where I have seen it is at Whole Foods and the Specialty Food Shop at Sick Children's hospital. (Ener-G bread is quite expensive, which is why I hardly ever buy it--one knows that one's allergies are out of hand when bread is a 'luxury' item.) They do have a wide variety of products for people who have special dietary needs---there's a large Gluten free section, they sell Enjoy Life products, etc. (but currently, Enjoy Life cereal and cookies can be found for a better price at The Big Carrot on the Danforth.) So I shop there but try to stop by during quiet times of the day when the peanut butter machine is less likely to be in demand. And I quicken my pace if I'm ever anywhere near the 'wall of death.'
[This message has been edited by LisaM (edited February 11, 2006).]

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 10:22am
ElleMo's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by LisaM:
[b]I do think that this company is allergy-aware anyways, but it is good to see them become more so. I wish they would get rid of the peanut butter making machine---I haven't had a reaction when walking past it, but the stench is nauseating when the machine is in operation. I avoid the section if the machine is in use or hold my breath![/b]
I don't think they are allergy aware at all. I think they pretend to be but are not. Any store with a peanut making machine is not allergy aware, IMHO. In the store near me (in New Jersey) the pb machine is unmanned & customers use it; there is a nut roasting station; there is an aisle of bins with nuts, rice and wheat.
They have all these products that are allergen free but a person with contact or airborne sensitivities can die in their store. How is that considered allergy aware?

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 12:21am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

[quote]Originally posted by Jana R:
[BThe family wants Whole Foods Market to pay more than $7,000 in medical bills.
The store's insurance offered $1,400 - an amount Roman said is roughly their out-of-pocket expenses.
.............
The Romans say they don't want to sue - they just want an apology and they want to send a message.
[/i]
Why do they say they just want an apology, when what they want is $7,000.
I never eat at those sample tables - but I do allow my son to (he has no [b]known[/b] food allergies). Coud something happen to him? Yes - same as eating at school or at home or at a friend's place. And if it happens, it is the fault of no one.
Adding to what csc said about the sample tables - when food is set up there is always an adult there serving it. They wear gloves (probably latex) and put individual servings into a container. My only complaint is that once I saw a container given to a child (about 9 years old) without a parents permission. I quietly pointed out to the woman working there that the reason she shouldn't is some children have food allergies - and pointed to the *allergy warning* sign.

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 1:22am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Lisa M., thank-you for telling me where Whole Foods is in Toronto. Okay, so it's a health food store.
So that means that the whole chain we're talking about is a chain of health food stores?
I have personally found, since PA diagnosis, that navigating a health food store and buying things from it is a lot more difficult than buying them at the grocer (if you can find the same things at the grocer to begin with).
I loved your "wall of death" reference.
I go to one health food store once a month and I scoot in and out, even if I have the kids with me. We're in the supplement aisle and the food is quite separate from us.
But, if they were offering samples at a health food store, I probably (please note probably) would not let me PA son try one because of the increased peanuts/nuts in the store to begin with. A cross-contamination thing.
However, I have not been to Whole Foods in Toronto and I'm getting the sense that if it's quite large and things are separate, that it may very well be similar to shopping at a grocery store, except for the pb making machine and if the samples were set up the same way they are in the grocery store - away from other food; clean; same warnings; I'm not sure that I wouldn't allow my son to sample something. It would be a more "iffy" situation for me.
And again, if I allowed my son, with known PA, to sample something in what I consider to be a health food store (more high risk than the grocer, IMPHO), then it would be *my* responsibility if something should happen to him, not the store's.
Anna Marie, you extended the point further really well - our children eating at homes of other children; school; etc. Now, with the school, if they knowingly fed my PA child something peanut-y, that's a whole other story, isn't it? But, if my non-PA child eats something in her classroom and has a reaction, again, it's not the fault of anyone because we don't know that she has any FA's (she doesn't, but meaning she might have developed one I don't know about).
Even with the school, with the breakfast program, each child was asked to have their parent sign a liability waiver - that the parent understood that their child was eating food provided at the breakfast program, blah blah blah.
Is it not my personal responsibility if I allow my children to eat anything other than something that is made in my home?
If I prepare something in my home, that I am led (through labeling and/or a manufacturer call) to be peanut free, and something happens to my son, is it my responsibility or do I deal with the manufacturer?
If all they want is an apology, they should take the $1,400.00 that I feel was graciously offered.
Based on what I have read here only, I think what they are doing is ludicrous.
If the parents didn't know the child had an allergy, how can a store be held responsible for him having a reaction?
Or, do I contact the makers of Eatmore and say, hey, I fed my son an Eatmore bar, or bits thereof, and he had a PA reaction and that's how I found out he was PA, but I'm holding you liable? 8+ years later?
Each time any of our PA children have a reaction are we going to sue the manufacturer? I guess I'll be contacting Duncan Hines and Kraft/Boca. Their labeling said the product was safe to eat. They maintained after the reaction (not anaphylactic) that the product was, indeed, safe. It wasn't.
Now, when it is blatant, as in one case I am thinking about that has been posted here - yes, by all means.
I just don't think it's right, obviously.
I also think it minimizes or has the potential to make thing more difficult for people with allergies should they have a reaction. Can't explain that one without more coffee, but I know what I mean.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 2:36am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

csc, I don't know why when you mentioned Eatmore, it reminded me of what happened to me many years ago.
I knew I had allergies, but I had absolutely no idea what they were. Well, I suspected peanuts - and I had suspected wheat. (I was reacting to bread and pizza and many other foods with wheat in them - not realizing they also either had sesame seeds or had trace amounts.)
Well, we went into a little deli-type store in a mall and I bought a sesame snack. (It's kind of like peanut brittle only full of sesame seeds.) That was what caused my most severe ever reaction.
The following day dh went back to the mall to check the ingredients in the sesame snack. The guy working in the store got upset with him - he had taken out a pen and paper to write down the ingredients and the guy told him he had to buy it. DH says it almost killed my wife - I'm not buying it. He chased dh out of the store. I mean he physically ran to the customer side of the counter and chased him out swinging something at him. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] He was hollaring "I sell good food - my food not bad, not make people sick." When dh got out of the store (into the mall part) there was a policeman eyeing him. So, dh went over and explained the situation. His wife had an allergic reaction and almost died. He wanted to see what the ingredients in this product was, but didn't want to buy it. The policeman escorted him into the store and allowed him to look at the package.
btw, we never ever considered sueing anybody. Nobody did anything wrong. If I had [i]known[/i] I was allergic to sesame seeds I wouldn't have eaten it. But, if I didn't know, how could I expect the guy selling it to know?

Posted on: Sun, 02/12/2006 - 5:52am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Oh my soul, Anna Marie. How sweet of your DH though to go to get a list of ingredients. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I guess the fellow thought he was in some kind of trouble. I wonder what the heck he came at your DH with from behind the counter. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]
At least the officer was able to help your DH get a list of the ingredients.
I guess I should consider my forays into ingredient label reading pretty tame. I mean, no one has ever bothered me. I may get strange looks, but that's about it.
But no, not knowing you were sesame seed allergic, you wouldn't sue the makers of the sesame seeds snacks (I really loved those btw, haven't found a "safe" one I don't think).
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

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