Candy Labeling

Posted on: Fri, 07/16/1999 - 2:03am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I called the Hersey company today to ask about the labeling on their "Mounds" candy bar. No where on there was a "May contain nuts" note. I decided to call because I was sure that it was made in the same plant as "Almond Joy." It is. Apparently (according the operator) everyone for the attorney's to the CEO decide that the label was not necessary. They all felt the label was unnecessary because of the precautions they have taken.

I don't know about anyone else, but I will not be feeding my son any "Mounds." Does any one else know about other foods like this? Isn't it the law that they list "May contain nuts" on the label if in the same plant?

Thanks for any input.

------------------
Kelly M
Another Mom in Michigan

[This message has been edited by Spencer's Mom (edited July 16, 1999).]

Posted on: Fri, 07/16/1999 - 6:22am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

pA letter to all manufacturers from the FDA regrding Food labeling of allergenic substances can be found at the following address: /p
p [url="http://ttp://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/allerg7.html"]ttp://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/allerg7.html[/url] /p
pThe natural flavoring and spices is still an area of concern. Overall, it is recommended that manufacturers note on the label if it is a know allergen; however, it is not a requirement. /p
pThe "may contain" verbiage you noted, is not required. I personally would like to encourage manufacturers to utilize the Neogen testing technology to determine if any peanut residue is present in a non-peanut item./p
pI would encourage you to explore the FDA site, it is very informative (go to the home page for peanutallergy.com and click on the "new" item regarding peanut allergy research) - You will end up at a page with links, one of them being to the FDA ./p
pI copied the following from a previous posts:/p
p posted May 18, 1999 12:00 PMbr /
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------br /
I just spoke to a physician at the FDA Center. He does see our needs to have natural flavorings listed on ingredient labels. He suggested I write:br /
Joseph Levitt, Director for Food and Safety and Applied Nutritionbr /
FDA 200 C Street SWbr /
Washinton DC 20204/p
p[This message has been edited by Mary (edited July 16, 1999).]/p

Posted on: Fri, 07/16/1999 - 7:05am
SteveW's picture
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Joined: 04/08/1999 - 09:00

pDuring my discussion with Hershey, they said that they use the "may contain" label if an item is manufactured on shared equipment. For example cocoa is made in the same plant with peanut containing products. However, it is made in a different area of the plant and not labeled for peanut. Personaly, I feel comfortable using Hershey's cocoa, baking chocolate and chocolate syrup. These products are also made earlier in the manufacturing process. Candy makes me a little more nervous./p

Posted on: Fri, 07/16/1999 - 9:59am
Christine's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

pI totally agree with Steve on this issue. I am also confident in the cocoa, but candy bothers me. Candy has really become a non-issue for me as I feel it is too risky. Statement or not, my son will not eat any chocolate bars of any sort except from Vermont Nut Free. The only other candy that I will allow is from Cambridge candies (makers of Tootsie Rolls). Even with those, I'm a little edgy. I think trying to eat those candy bars is kind of risky as they are all made in close proximity to each other. It is probably best to stick with thinks such as fruit rolls, Starburst, Skittles, etc.br /
Christine/p

Posted on: Sat, 07/17/1999 - 9:43am
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pMary, Steve and Christine - Thank you for your input. I guess I am glad I am not alone in being a little nervous on this issue (however I wish none of us had to worry about it)./p
pChristine, you started to answer my next question... how do you handle the candy issue with your child? What do you sub for the risky candy? We have a non-PA child and she wants to eat candy (she is older than Spencer) yet we are unable to let her because of the risk she will share or cause a reaction. /p
pWe eat very healthy at our house but I think it is perfectly normal for children to ask for treats (because they see other children eating them). We are really struggling with this issue./p
pThanks!/p
p------------------br /
Kelly Mbr /
Another Mom in Michigan/p

Posted on: Sat, 07/17/1999 - 9:47pm
Christine's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

pKelly,br /
For the most part, my kids don't eat candy at home. They certainly have their share of junk at home; however, it is mainly in the form of ice cream or pop tarts. We are just not big "candy" eaters. My older child has been given candy at birthday parties, school parties, etc. which she then brings home. Or occasionally when her and I are at the grocery store she will ask for some MMs. She is allowed to eat this candy but not in my son's presence. She will either eat it when we are out without my son or she will save her candy until he goes to bed. Or I will have her go up to her room or down in the basement and eat something if she's "just got to have it." This doesn't happen too often. She is old enough also, and conscious enough of Evan's allergy, to be very neat while eating the "forbidden" food and we clean up well afterward. Evan, of course, does want treats too but he knows that he cannot have any type of chocolate. He seems satisfied with skittles. He really prefers cakes and ice creams though.br /
Christine/p

Posted on: Sun, 07/18/1999 - 2:02am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

pChristine - Is Evan allergic to eggs? We kind of have a double problem with Spencer because both eggs and peanuts/nuts are bad triggers for him. Of course this means no chocolate or bakery goodies./p
pI have not tried making a cake without eggs yet but I can tell you that the muffins I made fell apart big time. I guess I am looking for a good "treat" that is not a risk in either area. Not an easy job!/p
pI like the idea of Skittles, however, Spencer is only one so I worry about the choking risk at this point. It feels like a never ending thing!/p
pThanks for your help! [img]http://client.ibboards.com/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------br /
Kelly Mbr /
Another Mom in Michigan/p

Posted on: Sun, 07/18/1999 - 5:58am
SteveW's picture
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Joined: 04/08/1999 - 09:00

pWe have tried FAN's no-egg, no-milk, no-peanut birthday cake and chocolate cupcakes. Both tasted OK, but the texture was drier than you're used to and they go stale faster. We have also tried using some of the FAN substitutes (baking powder and oil or pureed apricots) for eggs in muffins and cake. The muffins came out really well (with the apricot), the cake (with oil and baking powder) tasted great but fell a little bit. Her guess is that cupcakes work better with egg substitutes than cake. We are having pies more often than cakes because a homemade crust is only flour, salt, shortening (or butter depending on your recipe), and water. We haven't checked into any of the store-bought crusts since we generally make our own./p
pAt the FAN conference they were talking about which egg substitute to use and when. They said if the egg is acting as leavening use a baking powder based substitute. If the egg is being used for liquid then the apricot would work better. If there is a lot of baking powder or baking soda in the recipe, we use the apricot./p
pFAN may have a booklet on substitutes, you might want to check with them./p

Posted on: Mon, 07/19/1999 - 1:06am
Christine's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

pKelly,br /
Yes, Evan is also allergic to eggs and this is quite a challenge. I have made the FAN, egg-free chocolate cake, and, as Steve says, it's just "okay". The cake is quite dense an d kind of chewy. The other thing I make him is the Betty Crocker Stir and Frost Devil's Food Cake and Carrot Cake. Neither of these two have egg in the ingredients nor do you have to add egg to them. As with anything "store bought" there is no 100% guarantee that this food is totally safe; however, I think Betty Crocker is pretty good in the area of allergy awareness and their labeling is excellent. They always have the allergenic foods listed separately at the bottom. These two cakes are pretty good and they work well when you have to send something into school quickly. /p
pI have contemplated for Evan's next birthday making him a homemade ice cream cake. I trust Breyer's to be about as risk-free as one can get without being in a nut free plant. I thought I would make the dense, FAN chocolate cake in a thin layer and sandwhich it between two layers of Breyers vanilla, and then put a thin, white frosting on it. I think this will be better than the other attempts I've made at a "normal" cake. The cake will be cold, so it's denseness won't really be noticed. /p
pBy the way, you're right, Skittles would definitely not be good for a one year old.br /
Christine/p

Posted on: Mon, 07/19/1999 - 7:24am
MaryLynn's picture
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Joined: 06/25/1999 - 09:00

pI have let my daughter eat KitKat bars as they do not have any nuts, peanuts or soy (except lecithin which my allergist has told me is safe for my daughter). If she wants anything else, I buy Bakers Chocolate and use it for dipping. We have made choc. covered pretzles, graham crackers, animal crackers, marshmallows and cherrys. The cherries were tough to handle but the others were a real sucess./p
pMary Lynn/p

Posted on: Mon, 07/19/1999 - 9:48am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

pChristine - We are facing the birthday situation too. Madison will be 3 on 8/14 and Spencer will be 2 on 9/15. We usually do a joint birthday party between the two dates. I was thinking about contacting the woman who made our wedding cake (a LONG time ago). She works out of her home and would be able to control the environment. She is a distant cousin so I think she would be willing to help. Madison has her heart set on a "pink birthday cake." She has been talking about it for a couple of weeks now so I really need to make this happen!/p
pI have also enlisted the help of my grandmother (going on age 80). If anyone has a recipe that will work for Spencer it is going to be her! She has offered to teach me how to make my own candy so that I can bring the "treats" to preschool on special occasions. I am not much of a cook but I figure if I can make it through grad school surely I can do this...I hope! I will let you know what we find. We are going to work on this next Wed./p
pThanks for the suggestions! I think your ice cream idea is a great one!/p
pOh, one last question...does your son have a problem with egg products that are frozen? We tried giving Spencer frozen waffles and he did fine so we gave it to him the next day for breakfast. Now he has the "runs" and we are not sure if we gave him too much or it is just a fluke. You never know with kids. What has been your experience?/p
pThanks again!/p
p------------------br /
Kelly Mbr /
Another Mom in Michigan/p

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