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Posted on: Fri, 11/24/2000 - 7:40am
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Anonymous (not verified)

pMich, thanks for posting this. We'll all be on the look-out when we go to the store (hopefully). I must admit that I am the worst when it comes to checking on an item that I'm not buying because my children decide to go absolutely insane in the grocery store. I noticed that you had posted somewhere else to-day, I'm kinda hoping it's re this also. /p
pSo, for all of us Canadians reading Mich's post, please see if you can check on the safety of Smarties. Also, Mich, there is a line of Smarties out right now in the stores, for Christmas, the Smarties Shaker Ball that are definitely not "safe"./p
pIf Nestle has changed their Smarties label, I'm going to be one ticked off co-ordinator! Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Wed, 11/29/2000 - 11:21am
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pSmarties...br /
Snowballs or Shaker balls DO have a "may contain warning" on them, as i just saw this product for the first time tonite.br /
Smarties x-mas packs (green and red smarties) are okay still./p
pThe good thing about Nestle, is that their labelling is great (except of course when they mistakenly cover the warning with a flap etc.!)/p

Posted on: Wed, 11/29/2000 - 1:07pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pRedtruck, thank-you, excellent, informative, and much needed post! You obviously get to check the labels in peace in the grocery/variety store, don't you? Thank-you SO much for this info. though so it has us all settled back down. Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 11/30/2000 - 12:30pm
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pHi, just another Canadian joining in. I haven't been using this as often as I used to and it is nice to see a Canadian thread. I keep a log booklet of all co. their phone numbers, contact people and the products that are safe and are not safe. I update it every 6-9 months or so. I would be more than happy to discuss this with other Canadian P.A. parents. I am located in the South western region of Ontario. Sorry I did not get to read through the whole thread as it is getting late..but I will on the weekend. Sounds like we have some good info./p

Posted on: Thu, 11/30/2000 - 2:39pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pMadi's Mom, do you have a more comprehensive list than what you can find at [url="http://www.nuconnexions.com"]www.nuconnexions.com[/url] ? It is computerized?br /
If it is better than theirs, I would love to see it posted under discussion heading with a re-direct from this thread!/p
pIf it is computerized and e-mailable, I would even be willing to volunteer to post the information on your behalf. I would also make it very clear that I was posting this information on your behalf so that no one could give me credit for information that you have worked very diligently to acquire and then keep up-dated. Please let me know what you think./p
pWhen I've had to deal with a manufacturer, I usually go to [url="http://www.nuconnexions.com"]www.nuconnexions.com[/url] and see what they may have listed about them. Then, if they aren't there, I'll try to find an actual company website and e-mail address for them and go that route. But what a wonderful list of information you must have at your fingertips. Do you realize how totally amazing that is? WOW!/p
pAt any rate, please let me know, if it is computerized and e-mailable, I would be more than willing to post it on your behalf (I type really fast) and again, I would make it very clear that I was posting on your behalf.br /
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Fri, 12/01/2000 - 12:46am
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pHi, I am another Canadian who has a PA daughter. I previously worked in the food industry before and after I had my daughter. She is now 6. I live in South WEstern Ont. I have dealt alot with the food co. I , like Cindy, would just look at the labels and if it did not say anything about "may contain" I would buy it. However you are right Cindy. It is NOT required by law for any co. to put that on their label. I do know that alot of big co. like the Mr. Christie's and Kraft's of the world are very concientious (sp?) about it. It IS NECESSARY to call the co. Some put it on as a blanket protection., some put it on if they know it has not come in contact with peanuts/nuts and some just choose not to. So you really don't know by looking at the label. I keep a log book with co. name, address, phone, contact and list of safe products. Updated every 6 months or so. You are welcome to it. Let me know. The President choice and no name products DO NOT LIST 'may contain". YOu have to call the grocery store where it came from. Ask for customer service...they call the manufacturer and then call you back. I have those numbers too. Hope this helps./p

Posted on: Fri, 12/01/2000 - 1:04am
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pI have written this reply three times and they have yet to go through. I hope this does. I am a fellow Cdn. living in South western Ont. I worked in the food industry before and after my PA daughter was born. Cindy, you are right, co. are NOT Required to put the 'may contain' sign on the label. So you really don't know when you read the label. Some co. put it on for blanket protection, some co. like the Mr christie's and Krafts of the world put it on, and you know it is safe. Some co. do not put the may contain sign on and you do not at all unless you call them. The no name labels, grocery labels and P.C. etc DO NOT Put any labelling of MAY Contain at all so you have to call the grocery store HEad office. They call the manufacturer and then call you back. I keep a log book with name, phone address, contact name and a list of safe products..updated every 6-9 months or so. You are welcome to discuss this we me if you are interested in the information. I hope this helps./p

Posted on: Fri, 12/01/2000 - 1:08am
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pI have written this reply three times and they have yet to go through. I hope this does. I am a fellow Cdn. living in South western Ont. I worked in the food industry before and after my PA daughter was born. Cindy, you are right, co. are NOT Required to put the 'may contain' sign on the label. So you really don't know when you read the label. Some co. put it on for blanket protection, some co. like the Mr christie's and Krafts of the world put it on, and you know it is safe. Some co. do not put the may contain sign on and you do not at all unless you call them. The no name labels, grocery labels and P.C. etc DO NOT Put any labelling of MAY Contain at all so you have to call the grocery store HEad office. They call the manufacturer and then call you back. I keep a log book with name, phone address, contact name and a list of safe products..updated every 6-9 months or so. You are welcome to discuss this we me if you are interested in the information. I hope this helps./p

Posted on: Fri, 12/01/2000 - 5:49am
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Anonymous (not verified)

pMadi's Mom, it sounds as if you do have a much more comprehensive list. If it is computerized and you are able to attach it to an e-mail for me, my e-mail address is [email]cscook@upath.com[/email] I would then come back in here (not this week-end, I have a birthday party to deal with! LOL! - no having children after age 30 anyone else!) and post it under the appropriate discussion heading and give complete credit to you. But, I would get the information down and out there for everyone to see. Please let me know if you feel okay with this. Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2000 - 1:30am
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Joined: 12/07/2000 - 09:00

pMy daughter is 5 years old and has been wearing an epi-belt since she was 2. The e-belt holds one epi-pen. She knows that she is not allowed out of the house without the epi-belt. I put my daughter into private school to ensure her safety. At her school they cook all meals and NO outside products are allowed into the school. Before registering her in private school, I checked out "peanut free" schools in the area. Although every Principal was aware and extremely helpful, they all stated that the school could only be "peanut aware". Since it is a public school, if someone wanted or insisted that their child bring in peanut product they could not enforce the "Peanut free" as there could be law suits. There was an article recently in the Toronto Star where a mother was upset that her child was told not to bring peanut butter into school and she said that it was the only thing her child would eat and that her child was on a different floor from the child that had the PA. I wrote back in a letter to the editor stating that what she was teaching her child was to be inconsiderate of others. I also asked how she would feel if my daughter brought a loaded gun to school even if it was not on the same floor as her child. My daughters allergy is so severe that I consider any peanut product a "dangerous weapon"./p

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2000 - 1:38am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pKnapp, I totally agree with you. And yet, you may find that even among PA parents, we would be considered extremists! I am currently having some difficulties with my son's school and am trying to work through them as best as I can to ensure his safety. He is in the public school system and has a "peanut free" classroom./p
pI think it is wonderful that you wrote the letter to The Star. Was it published? It's really something that people still need to be educated about and I believe I responded under Media about the article and then the letter of this one Mother. If I hear the story of how pb is the only thing someone's child will eat again, my head will explode.br /
If I hear the story again of how low income = pb my head will also explode. For some reason, and I'm not clear why, this continues to be and probably always will be a contentious issue. It's rather sad. I feel that if your child is in school for all of 6 or 7 hours, they can be deprived of pb for that time. Eat it for breakfast. Eat it for dinner. Eat it for bed-time snack. Simply don't eat it at school. What is the big deal? However, it seems to be./p
pBest wishes for you and your child! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 12/14/2000 - 12:23am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pI just spoke with a Consumer Affairs representative, Josh, at Pillsbury Canada (1-800-767-5350). He advised me that we do sell American made Pillsbury products on our shelves. These would include the One-Step Brownies and the slice and bake holiday cookies. Canadian Pillsbury does not attempt to label these products as "safe" or "may contain" because they are not clear of the source of the product - i.e., what Pillsbury plant they may have been made in and whether or not they are "safe" or not./p
pHe did tell me very clearly that if I was concerned about cross-contamination, to stay away from all American Pillsbury products on our shelves. Now, this may seem very stupid of me, but I had simply assumed we made the bloody things here. I didn't realized that we imported food products when we had a Canadian version of the company here, in Canada. I'm not clear if I'm the only person that has made this assumption or not./p
pAt any rate, I wanted to warn anyone that may not have thought to check if a food product had been imported from the U.S. with large manufacturers. I am now off to check all of my Kellogg's cereals. I think they're okay./p
pBut, Pillsbury, if you're going to buy a product, please check to see if it has been imported from the U.S. If it has, "buyer beware" as Pillsbury Canada is not responsible for labeling these products.br /
I have listed this information also under Grievances Against Pillsbury and Canadian Pillsbury under Manufacturers./p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 12/14/2000 - 12:28am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pPlease see the Grievances Against Pillsbury and Canadian Pillsbury threads under Manufacturers./p
pWhen buying a Pillsbury product, you must check to see if we have imported it from the U.S. If we have, Pillsbury Canada cannot guarantee that they are "safe" or "may contain" because they are unable to properly label the product. American Pillsbury products on our shelves include the One-Step Brownies and the slice and bake holiday cookies./p
pNow, to me, this all appeared "safe". I didn't even realize, and this is probably REALLY stupid, that when we had a Canadian manufacturing facility of a large American company, that we would import food products.br /
I thought we made our own version here. Well, in this case, we don't./p
pIf you do choose to buy an American Pillsbury product, it is basically "buyer beware". The Consumer Affairs person was very clear with me that Pillsbury Canada does label properly but to be on the "safe" side, not to buy any American Pillsbury products because of the high risk of cross-contamination./p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 12/14/2000 - 12:31am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pPlease see the Grievances Against Pillsbury and Canadian Pillsbury threads under Manufacturers./p
pWhen buying a Pillsbury product, you must check to see if we have imported it from the U.S. If we have, Pillsbury Canada cannot guarantee that they are "safe" or "may contain" because they are unable to properly label the product. American Pillsbury products on our shelves include the One-Step Brownies and the slice and bake holiday cookies./p
pNow, to me, this all appeared "safe". I didn't even realize, and this is probably REALLY stupid, that when we had a Canadian manufacturing facility of a large American company, that we would import food products.br /
I thought we made our own version here. Well, in this case, we don't./p
pIf you do choose to buy an American Pillsbury product, it is basically "buyer beware". The Consumer Affairs person was very clear with me that Pillsbury Canada does label properly but to be on the "safe" side, not to buy any American Pillsbury products because of the high risk of cross-contamination./p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 12/14/2000 - 12:50am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pOkay, I have posted THREE times and each time it says there is an "internal error" and the post was not accepted. But, if I look at the # of replies to this topic, the three posts (all the same) should be in there./p
pVery simply, please see Grievances Against Pillsbury and Canadian Pillsbury threads under Manufacturers. Do not buy American imported Pillsbury products if you are even slightly concerned about cross-contamination./p
pNow, where did those other three posts go so I can edit them out properly? Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 12/14/2000 - 12:53am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pOh, to heck with it, each of the three posts about Pillsbury were slightly different in their wording so I'm going to leave them be, especially since this is a good caution post.br /
My apologies, but might as well leave them then try to decide which one of the three says it "best" and edit the other two. Again, my apologies. Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2000 - 1:33am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pPlease see information posted specific to Canadian manufactured plain M M's under two different threads - one under Manufacturers and one under the question in Main Discussion about the difference between "may contain" and "made in a facility". Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2000 - 1:39am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pThis thread is driving me batty! When I post something, I get the internal error message.br /
So I go to re-post and it says flood activation is on, so my post has actually been taken. Then, I come back in and although my post shows up in the numbers responding to the thread, the post hasn't shown up yet! LOL! Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 12/21/2000 - 2:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pI need 3 or 4 Canadians to send Smarties to our American friends. Please, anyone...../p
pSeason's Greetings and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Tue, 12/26/2000 - 11:59pm
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pMovie theatres...anyone have any problems there with popcorn etc.? I assume they dont use any peanut oils etc.br /
Thinking of bringing the kids to a movie for the first time and wondering if anyone else had any problems or all ok! Thanks./p

Posted on: Wed, 12/27/2000 - 2:39pm
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Joined: 09/21/2000 - 09:00

pCan anyone tell me where I can find info on the labeling laws for Canada. I tried a search on my own but it was taking me ages and I didn't find exactly what I'm looking for.br /
I want info on what they have to put on labels. How much of an ingredient has to be in an item before it has to be on the packaging.br /
Thanks [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p

Posted on: Thu, 12/28/2000 - 1:53am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

predtruck, I would call the actual movie theatre that you're planning to go to and ask them. That's what I do if I'm going to say McDonald's. We don't go there very often, maybe twice a year if I get to Barrie, but when I know I'm going, I call the actual one I'll be going to. If I was going to a theatre now (I should be so lucky - I SO envy you - no theatre in town here), I would call the actual theatre. Then, if it didn't seem as though you got a good enough response from them, I would call whichever chain owns them (i.e., Famous Players or Odeon)./p
pHere's hoping it's okay. Film review would be appreciated too!/p
pCara, I'm pretty sure that I have seen something on this board re manufacturing label requirements for Canada. I'm not even clear if the information is in this thread itself. Have you scanned all 5 pages of it?br /
I'm almost positive, but I think Cayley's Mom or Kathyrn have provided a link to information on a website re this. Perhaps if you did a search by UserName you may be able to find it. Sorry, I know that wasn't much help, but I do know that I've seen something.br /
I don't think we have a % thing like they do in England (what is it there 25% or something?) but I may be wrong./p
pSeason's Greetings and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Sun, 02/25/2001 - 9:23am
redtruck's picture
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pThought i'd bring this thread back to life for some newcomers.br /
Maybe since its soooo long, Cindy we should start a new one...Canadians Part 2 or 2001 edition!/p

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2001 - 5:24am
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pHi to all the Canadians out there! I just thought I'd drop a little note in here to let you all know how fortunate you are! We moved to Calgary last September from the states and then back in January (long story). Anyway, before leaving I was very nervous about another country and dealing with Trace's allergies. Boy was I pleasantly surprised! Every restaurant had ingredient lists, there were signs everywhere about food allergies, evry playgroup we were in had a no peanut policy - it was wonderful! Now that we are back in the states I'm realizing what a nightmare it is just to go out to eat! So, though you guys do still have problems, be grateful that most people will ask before giving your child food, and few will look at you strange when you inform them of the allergies! There are many days I wish I could be back in Canada even if only for my son.br /
CoCo/p

Posted on: Sun, 03/11/2001 - 6:37am
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Joined: 11/14/2000 - 09:00

pDoes anyone know if a bookstore in Toronto carries the book "No Nuts for Me". I have already checked with Chapters and Scholar's Choice and both do not carry it. I know I can order it through this site, but I thought that if was available at a local bookstore, I could save on the shipping costs./p

Posted on: Sun, 03/11/2001 - 7:18am
Donna Fitz's picture
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Joined: 03/11/2001 - 09:00

pHi Caterina, I purchased my copy of No Nuts for Me at Cole's book store. I'm not sure if you that store or not, as I'm from Saskatoon, but if you do check it out./p

Posted on: Sun, 03/11/2001 - 9:35am
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Joined: 02/28/2001 - 09:00

pHi Caterina;br /
I know that a store near me has the book and I will be moving to Toronto in about 2 weeks. If you cannot find it and want me to pick it up for you please just email me and I'll get it for you. That is, if you don't mind the 2 week wait. /p
pSharon /p
p[This message has been edited by ImStillSharon (edited March 11, 2001).]/p

Posted on: Mon, 03/12/2001 - 1:37am
Mich's picture
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pI bought my copy of the book at Chapters. Did you check the online store? I checked before I bought a copy and it said that my local store carried it. Good luck finding it./p

Posted on: Mon, 03/12/2001 - 5:31am
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pDear Care,/p
pYou can find Canadian labelling requirements, acts and legislation at the Canada Food Inspection Agency at [url="http://www.cfia-acia.agr.ca/."]www.cfia-acia.agr.ca/.[/url] The site is not the easiest to negotiate but you'll likely find what you're looking for. I have to say though', I sent them an e-mail regarding labelling laws with concerns etc. several month ago and have never heard back from them. I suppose I should not be surprised give that this is a Canadian government agency./p
pRegards,/p
pKatiee (Wade's mom)/p

Posted on: Mon, 03/12/2001 - 10:40am
jhi's picture
jhi
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pre No Nuts for Me/p
pI would suggest that you ask at Chapters. If they don't have it instore, but carry the title, they will ship it to you, expresspost, without shipping charges. This beats online shopping if you do happen to have a Chapters nearby./p

Posted on: Tue, 03/13/2001 - 10:22am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pI received the following information to-day from Dan Bellisario atbr /
1-800-668-2253, who called me in response to an e-mail I had sentbr /
concerning Christie's products./p
p The Christie's products that I currently buy and now know for sure arebr /
"safe" are Triscuits, Premium Plus Crackers, Ritz Crackers, Oreos, andbr /
Chips Ahoy, unless they have the "may contain" warning on them./p
p I have also brought up a number of other threads wherebr /
Nabisco/Christie's or one of their products was being discussed tobr /
also place the information there./p
p Well, I have information to post finally from Nabisco (owners ofbr /
Christie's in Canada). /p
p So, I will place the information I received to-day here but also inbr /
anybr /
other threads where it may be appropriate./p
p I had e-mailed Nabisco re Christie products in December. I had notbr /
had a response. So, to-day, I e-mailed them again./p
p I received a prompt telephone call from Mr. Dan Bellisario of Nabiscobr /
Canada. He can be contacted at 1-800-668-2253./p
p He indicated to me that the products I am currently buying are allbr /
completely safe and run on dedicated lines. There is actually abr /
concrete barrier between the parts of the manufacturing facility thatbr /
contain peanuts/nuts and the area that is manufacturing withoutbr /
them./p
p He also said that where there is the slightest chance ofbr /
cross-contamination, Christie's very clearly labels their products./p
p They work very closely with AAIA and had sent the alert to FAN.br /
Also,br /
because of their allergy awareness, they do not use peanut oil inbr /
anybr /
of their products and make sure that they monitor their productsbr /
verybr /
closely./p
p He told me that if I had any concerns about any of their products inbr /
the future to be sure to contact him, by name and he wouldbr /
follow-upbr /
for me. He also explained that the reason I had not received abr /
response earlier was because the person that had been dealing withbr /
my e-mail was no longer with the company./p
p So, I'm quite happy with this and say kudos to Christie's andbr /
Nabiscobr /
Canada!/p
p Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 03/22/2001 - 12:57pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

p[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img] Well, aren't I just a fine one. I had originally started this thread with the hopes that we could put all Canadian specific information here as well as on other parts of the board where it was appropriate. And who is perhaps the last person to think to place something in this thread anymore? Me!/p
pI e-mailed Trebor Allan about "safe" Easter chocolate. Both their response and my initial e-mail to them follow:-/p
pNow, here is thebr /
e-mail I received to-day from Trebor Allan. I have to say that I do think that they arebr /
okay. I'm also including the original e-mail I sent to them (only after their response)br /
just as an example of the e-mails I write. I know that different people had wanted usbr /
sharing what we wrote recently on the board. So, here goes:-/p
p Thanks so much for contacting us again and for your kind words about our products Allbr /
our products that contain peanuts/nuts will note this in the ingredient listing. Allbr /
products that do not contain peanuts/nuts but are manufactured in areas where theybr /
may have come in contact with peanuts/nuts, include this warning on the productbr /
label: "May have come in contact with peanuts and/or nuts". (This warning wouldbr /
apply to products manufactured on common production lines - that is a line whichbr /
manufactures peanut/nut products and is cleaned before running peanut/nut freebr /
products.) Products that do not contain peanuts/nuts or do not come in contact withbr /
peanuts/nuts will have no declaration or warning on the product label. These itemsbr /
leave our manufacturing facilities without having come in contact with peanuts and/orbr /
nut products. (This applies to two possible conditions. Firstly that the product isbr /
manufactured in a plant that does not use peanuts/nuts or secondly that the productbr /
is manufactured on a dedicated line. That is, a production line that does notbr /
manufacture products containing peanuts/nuts.) The Easter products you mention arebr /
labeled differently because they are manufactured at different sites. The hollowbr /
products are manufactured on a dedicated nut-free line, that is why they have nobr /
warning statement. And as you correctly point out, products that do not carry the nutbr /
warning statement, should be considered "safe" for individuals with peanut allergy. Itbr /
is important to be aware that manufacturing sites and ingredients may change frombr /
time to time. As such, we recommend that you carefully review the product packagingbr /
for ingredient declarations and nut content warnings prior to each use. We hope thisbr /
information has clarified our labeling policies for you. Should you or other parents havebr /
further questions, please do not hesitate to contact our Customer Relationsbr /
department at 1-800-565-6317. Best regards, Catherine Baldassare Consumerbr /
Relations /p
p Subject: Question Re Allan's Chocolate for Easter Dear Sir/Madam: I have been inbr /
contact with your company on numerous occasions in the past regarding peanutbr /
products in your candies/chocolates. I have always felt extremely comfortable with thebr /
quick response I have received to any/all questions. I am the parent of a child thatbr /
has a life threatening allergy to peanuts. I know that I am able to purchase Treborbr /
Allan pre-packaged loot bags for birthday parties, etc. as long as they do not have thebr /
"may contain" warning on them. A lot of parents of PA children will not allow theirbr /
children to eat chocolate unless it comes from the Vermont Nut Free Chocolatebr /
company in the U.S. This is not something I am comfortable with. I feel I should bebr /
able to buy my son chocolate from a Canadian company. The other night I was in ourbr /
local drug store looking at Easter treats. The two solid Easter bunnies by Allan's werebr /
labeled "may contain". However, the Easter bunnies that were not solid and also thebr /
Easter eggs with Sour Patch Kids, etc. were not labeled as "may contain". Therefore, Ibr /
consider them "safe". I understand that you do label your products correctly. However,br /
this concern is actually for other parents, other than myself. Is the chocolate thatbr /
does not have a "may contain" warning on it, run on "dedicated lines" where there isbr /
NO chance of it coming into contact with peanut/nut products, or is it run on a linebr /
that is cleaned well after a peanut product has been run? Any input you could give mebr /
would be greatly appreciated as I would like to be able to recommend Allan's (Treborbr /
Allan) chocolate Easter bunnies, unless they have the "may contain" warning, asbr /
"safe" for our peanut allergy children to consume. Thank-you for your time andbr /
consideration. /p
p Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 03/22/2001 - 12:59pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

p[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img] Did my whole post re Trebor Allan just get lost in cyberspace? The thread got brought back up to the top of the 1st page of the Main Discussion board but the post is missing! Perhaps it will show up...../p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Fri, 04/13/2001 - 1:47pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pAnother PA parent sent me this excellent article she got from CBC's Market Place website. It is very thought provoking and informative. I have posted about it in all of the other appropriate headings on the board. However, because it is Canadian specific, I thought I would bring it up here too./p
pHere goes:-/p
pThe Politics of Peanuts/p
pPeanut Allergies: A Medico-Legal Perspective/p
pBy Joel Doctor, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C) Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Thebr /
University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, and,br /
Eleanor Doctor, B.Ed., LL.B., Barrister and Solicitor /p
pRe-posted, with permission, from the Education Law Web Site/p
pIn recent years, the media has reported several cases of serious injury andbr /
death of students and others resulting from allergic reactions to peanutsbr /
and other foods. While such events are relatively infrequent, they arebr /
alarming, and educators are justifiably concerned about the possibility ofbr /
having to deal with a life-threatening allergic reaction in their schools.br /
In addition, an increasing number of schools have to deal with parents whobr /
are making what may appear, at first blush, to be unreasonable demands onbr /
schools to accommodate their children who have allergies, life-threateningbr /
and otherwise. /p
p"Reasonableness" from both legal and medical perspectives should drivebr /
anybr /
attempt to formulate policy or procedure to address these concerns. Forbr /
example, under human rights legislation, schools must reasonably accommodatebr /
students with disabilities. The term "disability" is broadly definedbr /
andbr /
would include life-threatening allergic conditions. Under the law ofbr /
negligence and liability, schools must do what is reasonable to preventbr /
reasonably foreseeable harm to students under their care. But what isbr /
reasonable? For this we must look to the medical experts for information andbr /
guidance. Below, we place this medical information within a legal frameworkbr /
to help schools address their concerns. /p
pThe Duty of Care /p
pThe first consideration in formulating policy and procedure is to considerbr /
who is owed a duty of care in the school context, by whom and under whatbr /
circumstances. /p
pWho is owed a Duty of Care? School authorities know that they owe a duty ofbr /
care to their resident students. However, following the broad principal ofbr /
law governing the duty of care, school authorities also owe a duty of carebr /
to their "neighbour" and "neighbour" is defined broadly asbr /
anyone who maybr /
come to harm as a result of ones acts or omissions, if the harm to thatbr /
person was reasonably foreseeable. Accordingly, a duty of care may be owedbr /
to school visitors: a visiting group of students who will be enjoyingbr /
refreshments after a basketball game; a sibling who is invited to class tobr /
participate in student's birthday party; or a child from a foreign countrybr /
who is visiting a student and is allowed to come to school and experience abr /
Canadian school environment. /p
pPolicy and procedure should address avoidance strategies and treatmentbr /
protocols for visiting children as well as for students in the school. /p
pSince liability must be founded on foreseeability of a risk of harm, abr /
determination must be made as to which, if any, students or children underbr /
the school's care, are at a real risk. The student's parent or guardian hasbr /
the primary duty to inform school authorities about their child'sbr /
life-threatening medical conditions, however, that duty may not absolvebr /
school authorities from the duty to ask the question. Remember, negligencebr /
and liability may also be founded on an omission to act. /p
pPolicy and procedure should provide a mechanism for obtaining this initialbr /
information, perhaps with a simple question on a student's registrationbr /
form, "Does your child have any medical problems of which the school shouldbr /
be aware?" or with an annual notice to parents requesting that they informbr /
the school if any such problems exist or arise during the school year. Belowbr /
we discuss what schools should do once they are alerted to studentbr /
allergies. /p
pBy whom is the Duty of Care Owed? The duty of care will be owed by thebr /
school board itself and, as well, by any employee or agent of the schoolbr /
board who supervises allergic students. In the latter case, school boardsbr /
will be held vicariously liable for the negligence of their employees orbr /
agents who are working within the scope of their assigned duties orbr /
performing duties that are reasonably related to their assigned duties.br /
Accordingly, it is not sufficient to inform only the student's home teachersbr /
and office personnel. It is incumbent upon schools to notify any person whobr /
may be supervising students including other staff members, substitutebr /
teachers or supervising parents about student allergies, particularly ifbr /
they are life-threatening. /p
pPolicy and procedure should provide for a method of ensuring that relevantbr /
information is transmitted to all supervising persons, particularly thosebr /
who supervise younger children. Further, your school may wish to considerbr /
whether lunch room programs and services should be operated independentlybr /
from the school, particularly where there is no legal obligation to providebr /
these programs and services to students. /p
pThe Standard of Care /p
pAs mentioned above, the standard of care expected of school authorities isbr /
stated in very general terms as that of "a careful and prudent parent of abr /
large family". It is a flexible standard depending upon the age, maturity,br /
intelligence, experience and behavioral propensities of the student, thebr /
type of activity in which a student is engaged and other relevant factors.br /
The foods ingested by and the eating environment of an intelligent,br /
sixteen-year-old student would not have to be as closely monitored, forbr /
example, as those of a grade-one student of a mentally-disabled olderbr /
student. The consensus statement of the Canadian Association of Allergy andbr /
clinical Immunology, the Ontario Allergy Society and the Allergy Asthmabr /
Information Association (the "Consensus Statement") proposes differentbr /
procedures for pre-school and primary grade students than for olderbr /
students. In the former, the consensus Statement recommends that, wherebr /
peanut allergic children are present, no peanuts, peanut butter orbr /
peanut-containing foods should be allowed. In the latter, the Consensusbr /
Statement recognizes that it may be impractical to impose a complete ban,br /
however, where peanut allergic students are present, it recommends that nobr /
peanut-containing foods be allowed in common eating areas. It alsobr /
recognizes that allergy-free classrooms may have to be established in thebr /
appropriate circumstances. The same would hole true for any otherbr /
potentially life-threatening allergens. /p
pPolicy and procedures should address differentiated avoidance strategies forbr /
the purpose of meeting a school's duty of care in a reasonable manner. /p
pMeeting the Standard of Care /p
pWhat schools should do to meet the requisite standard of care will depend,br /
in large part, on what school authorities know or ought to know aboutbr /
allergy. /p
pInhalation Versus Ingestion: A recent newspaper article claimed that "abr /
whiff of peanut butter on a desk may be enough to cause a violentbr /
anaphylactic reaction". In fact, the risk of a life-threatening allergicbr /
reaction resulting from this route of exposure is negligible. In abr /
home-economics class where peanuts are being used in cooking a satay dish,br /
peanut protein particles can become airborne and an allergic student maybr /
suffer itchy eyes, runny nose and asthma. A similar reaction could occur ifbr /
many students were crunching on peanuts in class and throwing them around atbr /
one another. An asthma attack could have serious adverse consequences,br /
however, the risk of violent anaphylaxis or death from inhaling airbornebr /
peanut is negligible. On the other hand, ingestion of even a minute amountbr /
of peanut could result in fatality. /p
pThe Life-Threatening Allergens: One teacher we interviewed refused to takebr /
any precautions with respect to her pre-school student's peanut allergy,br /
claiming she could not possibly monitor every child for everything to whichbr /
the child was "allergic". That position, founded in ignorance, isbr /
simplybr /
irresponsible. The primary concern of educators is to prevent againstbr /
anaphylaxis and resulting serious injury or death. Accordingly, abr /
distinction must be made between true allergic reactions and other forms ofbr /
food intolerance which are rarely, if ever, life-threatening. A furtherbr /
distinction must be made between allergens that are more likely to inducebr /
life-threatening reactions from those that rarely result in such reactions. /p
pAccording to the Consensus Statement, the list of foods which most commonlybr /
cause allergy is relatively short: peanut, tree nuts, seafood, egg, milk,br /
soy and wheat. Further, reactions to peanut, tree nuts and shellfish tend tobr /
be the most severe. Peanut allergies are one of the most common foodbr /
allergies and the leading cause of food-induced anaphylaxis and death.br /
Allergy to peanut is the most common cause of anaphylaxis in schools.br /
Accordingly, this pre-school teacher does not have to treat all children whobr /
have food reactions, allergic or otherwise, as she should treatbr /
life-threatening food allergies. /p
pAt a minimum, policies and procedures should address those allergies whichbr /
tend to be most common and have the most life-threatening potential in abr /
school context, namely, peanut allergies. For example, it would not take toobr /
much effort to remove peanut products form food prepared for allbr /
school-sponsored activities and school/community functions, including foodsbr /
prepared in the school cafeteria or during home economic classes. Theybr /
should also address the appropriate response to other allergies as directedbr /
by the allergic child's physician. /p
pThe Life-Threatening Condition - Anaphylaxis: Ideally, schools would preventbr /
all allergic reactions, however, as mentioned, the primary concern ofbr /
schools is the prevention and appropriate treatment of potentially severebr /
allergic reaction, namely, anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis affects multiple bodybr /
systems resulting in breathing difficulty and a drop in blood pressurebr /
caused by an outpouring of fluids from blood vessels. /p
pThe severity of allergic reactions are unpredictable. The research indicatesbr /
that although an individual's allergic reactions tend to be of similarbr /
severity to their prior reactions, it is not possible to predict with anybr /
certainty just how serious a future reaction might be. Since anaphylaxis canbr /
cause death quite quickly, it must be treated appropriately and as early asbr /
possible. /p
pPolicy and procedure should address how this can best be done. Below webr /
provide more specific information for this purpose. /p
pIdentifying At-Risk Students: It is necessary to determine which studentsbr /
are at risk of anaphylaxis. Not every allergic reaction in every studentbr /
calls for treatment with epinephrine and a dash to the nearest hospital.br /
Parents often claim that their children are allergic to many diversebr /
substances and have severe reactions to all of them, which is possible butbr /
highly unlikely. They may also make unreasonable demands on school-basedbr /
personnel. /p
pParents should be encouraged to get a complete assessment of their child'sbr /
condition from a physician with expertise in the diagnosis and management ofbr /
allergic conditions. For reasons which will become more evident, schoolsbr /
should recommend or insist that parents of allergic children provide thebr /
school with individualized, written physician-prescribed action plans. /p
pOnce allergic students are identified and the avoidance and treatmentbr /
strategies are determined, that information must be communicated to allbr /
persons who may supervise allergic students. In addition, at-risk studentsbr /
should have other means of identification, e.g., a medical alert bracelet. /p
pPolicy and procedure should address how students, particularly at-riskbr /
students, can be identified. They should also address, on an individualizedbr /
basis, how each allergic student should be monitored and treated, and howbr /
more specific information should be communicated efficiently to supervisingbr /
persons. The Allergy Asthma Information Association, 30 Eglinton West, Suitebr /
750, Mississauga, Ontario, L5R 3E7 has a Package that may help schoolsbr /
formulate procedures. It contains valuable information about allergybr /
including an Emergency Allergy Alert (protocol) Form. /p
pAvoidance Strategies: Since the smallest amount of ingested allergens canbr /
result in severe anaphylaxis and even fatality, the goal of avoidancebr /
strategies is to reduce that risk, recognizing that risk can never bebr /
completely eliminated in a school environment. Parents should instruct evenbr /
their youngest children in how to avoid contact with the substances to whichbr /
they are allergic. School personnel can reduce the risk of harm to allergicbr /
students by monitoring them carefully, particularly in the younger grades. /p
pAccording to the Consensus Statement, allergic children should eat onlybr /
foods that are prepared at home. They should not exchange foods or utensilsbr /
with other students. Students in the same class should be encouraged to washbr /
their hands before and after eating. Surfaces, toys and equipment should bebr /
washed clean of the allergen-containing foods and care should be taken tobr /
avoid allergens when selecting foods for crafts, cooking and otherbr /
activities. As mentioned above, all foods provided to students or used inbr /
school should be peanut-free, particularly in larger schools wherebr /
individual students may be harder to monitor. If necessary, a school maybr /
have to take reasonable measures to provide peanut-free environments. Bothbr /
the allergic student and others should be educated to understand thebr /
potential severity of reactions and to avoid exposing an allergic student tobr /
potentially harmful allergens such as peanut. /p
pPolicy and procedure should address avoidance strategies of generalbr /
application to the entire school population and those of specificbr /
application to students who are known to be at risk of anaphylaxis. /p
pThe Duty to Treat Reasonably: In spite of all the efforts by schoolbr /
personnel, allergic reactions cannot always be avoided. When emergencybr /
treatment is undertaken voluntarily, e.g., by a visitor in your school, thatbr /
person will be expected to do what is reasonable considering his or herbr /
knowledge, training and experience. Where there is a legal duty to providebr /
medical services to students or where schools formally undertake the duty tobr /
provide medical treatment to students, more will be expected of school-basedbr /
personnel. They will be expected to make reasonable efforts to gain thebr /
requisite skill and knowledge to undertake medical treatment, emergency orbr /
otherwise, appropriately. /p
pPolicy and procedure should provide for the training of staff in basic firstbr /
aid, resuscitative techniques and in the use of epinephrine auto-injectors.br /
It should provide a mechanism for staff to determine appropriate treatmentbr /
protocols, particularly for students at risk of anaphylaxis. /p
pManagement of Anaphylaxis: Two primary risk factors for death from foodbr /
allergy are underlying asthma and delay in administering epinephrine. Oftenbr /
children with food allergies also have asthma. The earliest manifestation ofbr /
an anaphylactic reaction is often asthma. Asthmatic children experiencingbr /
anaphylaxis are frequently treated for asthma while more appropriatebr /
treatment with epinephrine is withheld. There is no substitute forbr /
epinephrine in the emergency management of anaphylaxis. Althoughbr /
antihistamines and asthma inhalers are useful adjunctive therapies, theybr /
cannot be relied upon to adequately treat anaphylaxis. Several years ago, abr /
Canadian student on a school trip to Paris ate pate-containing nuts. Shebr /
took antihistamines and rushed back to her hotel to get further help.br /
Unfortunately, she succumbed to anaphylaxis before appropriate therapy couldbr /
be initiated. A dose of epinephrine could have saved her life. /p
pWhen a student experiences an allergic reaction, the physician-prescribedbr /
action plan should be followed. In the absence of any specific action plan,br /
the school should follow the Consensus Statement guidelines: "Epinephrinebr /
must be administered as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms ofbr /
severe allergic reaction." However, if the student has a history of severbr /
anaphylaxis or poorly controlled asthma, epinephrine may have to be given atbr /
the earliest sign of reaction. In extreme cases, epinephrine may have to bebr /
administered after ingestion and prior to the onset of any manifestations ofbr /
anaphylaxis. School-based personnel would have difficulty making thesebr /
clinical distinctions and that is why the physician-prescribed action planbr /
is so important! /p
pSchools should also take the following important precautions: /p
p1. Epinephrine should be kept in close proximity to children at risk ofbr /
anaphylaxis.br /
2. Epi-pens should be clearly marked with the student's name and routinebr /
checks should be undertaken to ensure that they are not stale-dated.br /
3. In all cases where epinephrine is administered the student should bebr /
transported to hospital immediately. In some cases, additional epinephrinebr /
may be required during transport.br /
4. Students at risk of anaphylaxis should be carefully monitored. Even anbr /
older student who knows how to self-administer epinephrine may need adultbr /
assistance if ability to self-administer is hampered by an adverse reaction.br /
In fact, it is our understanding that the student who died in Paris was notbr /
under any supervision at the relevant time./p
pPolicy and procedure should provide for the treatment of students inbr /
accordance with physician-prescribed action plans or, in the absence of suchbr /
plans, in accordance with predetermined guidelines. In addition, they shouldbr /
address precautions of general application to the school community. /p
pLiability for Breach of the Standard of Care /p
pIn light of the above information, failure to do what the reasonable prudentbr /
parent of a large family would do in the circumstances constitutesbr /
negligence. However, school authorities will not necessarily be liable orbr /
wholly liable to pay damages for such negligence. If, for example, thebr /
student had suffered severe neurological damage even if the appropriatebr /
treatment had been undertaken, school authorities would not be held liablebr /
for this injury. In the case of the student who died in Paris, schoolbr /
authorities would not be liable if the evidence proved that the studentbr /
would have succumbed even if several doses of epinephrine had beenbr /
administered. Further, they would not be liable if the chain of causationbr /
was broken. Even if school personnel are negligent in the monitoring andbr /
treatment of a student, the real cause of death could, for example, bebr /
caused by delay due to an accident enroute to the hospital. /p
pThe use of waivers should also be considered. It has been suggested that nobr /
parent should waive liability of school authorities for injuries to studentsbr /
caused by the negligence of school authorities. That proposition is moot,br /
because if there is no negligence, there will be no liability. Schoolbr /
authorities would probably prefer to have all liability waived, particularlybr /
where they voluntarily undertake to provide medical treatment to students.br /
However, the courts do not like waivers very much and will do everythingbr /
possible to get around them and find liability, particularly in abr /
sympathetic case. /p
pFurther, parents may only waive liability for their own damages, e.g., Forbr /
their expenses in transporting their child home, in providing care for theirbr /
child, in purchasing special equipment or hiring special services for thebr /
rehabilitation of their child. They cannot waive the school's liability forbr /
the child's damages. The child can sue in her own right after reaching thebr /
age of majority. In the case of injuries to minors, most provincial statutesbr /
of limitation will begin to run at that time./p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] /p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Wed, 09/05/2001 - 5:39am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pWow, it's been awhile since this thread has been raised for any matter./p
pI need FIVE CANADIANS to pair up with Americans for Smarties. As well I need at least THREE CANADIANS to pair up with Americans in the Nestle thread./p
pHelp!/p
pMany thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Thu, 09/06/2001 - 1:10pm
teacher's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/02/2000 - 09:00

pHi Cindy,/p
pI have a question for you about your comment about Nabisco products, Oreos in particular./p
pI've only bought Fudgee-O's for my kids, as Oreos contain the warning. Last summer, Nabisco came out with regular Oreos filled with yellow and blue filling, and they did not contain a warning. I was confused, so I phoned./p
pI was told that Fudgee-O's and the blue/yellow filled Oreos are most definitely peanut-free, but if the regular Oreos contain a warning, they should be avoided./p
pShe said, "We stand by our labelling ... if it doesn't have a peanut warning, you can be 100% assured they are safe." I asked her if the reverse of that was true, and she answered by advising me to stay away from anything with a warning./p
pObviously you must have been giving your child all those other products without any problem. Have you heard anything different recently?/p

Posted on: Sun, 09/09/2001 - 3:40am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pteacher, I haven't felt the need to check with Christie's (Nabisco) again re their products because it was clear to me that they were really clear in their labeling practices. I'm not sure if your products out west would be coming from the Christie's factory on Lakeshore Blvd. W. in Toronto./p
pJesse has only eaten Chips Ahoy and Oreos that were marked safely, i.e., without the "may contain" label. There are times of the year, or when they are different sizes or types, that they do become unsafe, i.e., "may contain", but again, I do feel quite comfortable with their labeling./p
pI also trust them as far as their crackers. They are the only ones Jesse has ever tried - Triscuits, Ritz (warnings on some of them, obviously he hasn't tried those), Premium Plus, Vegetable Thins, etc./p
pMaybe you would feel better if you e-mailed Christie's yourself and got an answer. It would be great if you were able to post it here as well./p
pI realize that we have to follow-up on manufacturers from time to time, but there are some that I just trust so completely that I only follow-up when I really feel the need or if I'm checking on something for school as the food monitor./p
pI don't have Christie's website address off the top of my head, but if you visit [url="http://www.nuconnexions.com"]www.nuconnexions.com[/url] and click on Food Allergies, they have a comprehensive list of manufacturers that you can visit from their website./p
pHope this helps. It does get confusing, doesn't it? To top it off, I find with Christie's/Nabisco there must be at least twenty different threads going re either Chips Ahoy or Oreos and it just gets overwhelming./p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
pOh, and I guess I *should* say that the intention of this thread originally, was for Canadian specific information that may differ from American information. I, for one, am at great fault for not posting consistently in this thread. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Sun, 09/09/2001 - 11:07am
teacher's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/02/2000 - 09:00

pThanks for that link, Cindy. It's amazing!/p
pWell, I did email Nabisco and asked them to give me a definitive answer on the Oreo debate! I will definitely post their reply when I get it./p
pI noticed at the site that the Chips Ahoy nut warning is temporary, and for the 550g bags only. (They said due to circumstances beyond their control, they have had to change the location where they make the cookies for the 550g bags.) They've placed a large stop sign with the words "new allergy warning" on the bags during the alert./p
pWhat a fantastic idea ... the stop sign should become the standard for allergy alerts! That would be awesome! /p
pAnyway, kudos to Nabisco for doing that. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p

Posted on: Sun, 09/09/2001 - 11:07pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pteacher, I'm fairly sure that redtruck posted in this thread the link for Canadian Food Alerts and Recalls (I forget the name of the official place the e-mail comes from). You can sign up there and get an e-mail when a food has been re-called or discovered to have products in it it shouldn't. Chris at PA.com does do a similar thing but it is not Canadian specific (his does include Canadian) and not as comprehensive./p
pThe reason I mention that is they did send out an alert re the Chips Ahoy 550g bag. If redtruck didn't post the link here, please let me know and I'll forward you a copy of the newsletter by e-mail so you could get it yourself. It's kinda interesting to see what's going on here food wise./p
pI'm really looking forward to the response you get from Nabisco as well. I'm glad you liked the [url="http://www.nuconnexions.com"]www.nuconnexions.com[/url] website. I mention it so often here that people must think I'm affiliated with it! It's just that when I'm looking for a manufacturer, it's the first place I go and for the most part it has never failed me./p
pI hope you're prepared to post your Nabisco response in twenty different threads throughout the board! LOL!/p
pMany thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Tue, 12/16/2003 - 12:11am
redtruck's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/23/2000 - 09:00

preraising this old thread for cindy!/p

Posted on: Wed, 12/17/2003 - 2:39am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

predtruck, very cool! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] When I just opened notification and saw that you had re-raised it, I thought, man, that was a different time. It wasn't like Canadians were non-existent on the board at the time, but perhaps we just wanted a Canadian thread, I don't know and now the numbers have certainly surged since then./p
pIt does bring back *good* memories though and I enjoyed seeing it re-raised. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]/p
pAnd actually, it *could* be used if you felt like posting information twice. I've probably also learned, since I started the thread, to put Canadian Specific beside Manufacturer threads I start [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]/p
pGreat grin happening, redtruck, thank-you. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Wed, 12/17/2003 - 6:34am
redtruck's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/23/2000 - 09:00

pNo problem cin, thought you might need a good grin!!/p

Posted on: Wed, 12/17/2003 - 8:01am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

predtruck, my dear man, there is only one other man who has ever called me Cin in *real* life. Now, of course, all e-mails are signed by Much Love, Cin, but still, I am blushing. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img]/p
pI needed the grin. It was nice of you to know that. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

Posted on: Mon, 02/09/2004 - 4:13am
Merri-Kim's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/30/2004 - 09:00

pHello, I'm looking for someone in the K-W, Stratford, London area... is there anyone out there? Also, if anyone is with the Avon-Maitland school board, I'd like to hear from you. I once read somewhere in one of the zillions of posts here, that you go in spurts when it comes to using PA.com - I've decided that I must be spurting! It would be great to hear from anyone matching the above criteria. Thanks, Kim/p

Posted on: Fri, 02/13/2004 - 1:33am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pMerri-Kim, I think domestic goddess may be in your area. smack as well. You may want to check to see if their e-mails are listed in their profiles./p
pMe, personally, I've never gone in spurts! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]/p
pBest wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]/p
p------------------/p

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