Can someone please explain the RAST class to me??

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One of my boys has an IgE level of 1.89 to peanuts, and 1.04 to egg. Not sure what any of this means. The only thing the allergist told me is that 0.35 is considered negative, and that 90% could tolerate peanuts under 0.60 and 90% couldn't tolerate them over 0.60. Thanks for your help in advance.

Dani

On Mar 13, 2007

**bump**

I don't understand the results.... please help... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Dani

On Mar 13, 2007

All of this stuff is confusing. I'd post this question in Main and ask for an explanation there. There will be people that I know can explain it way, way, way better than I can.

What I will say is that my younger son was testing at .33 for egg, and was negative to it for his skin test. We did an oral challenge and he passed -- but only for a week, and started reacting again. He is now a 2. So, be careful about taking anything, no matter how small, as a complete negative.

On Mar 13, 2007

5

[This message has been edited by Peanut Militia (edited March 13, 2007).]

On Mar 13, 2007

[quote]Originally posted by Peanut Militia: [B]Ask your doc for a copy of the test. Ours had an interpretation on the back with a 'class' code. I do not know if everyone is the same, but our said: kU/L Level of allerg.spec. IGE Class 0, <0.35 or Absent/Undetectable Class 1, .35 to.7 Low level Class 2, .71 to 3.5 Moderate level Class 3, 3.51 to 17.5 High Level Class 4, 17.6 to 50 very high level Class 5, 51-100 very high level Class 6, >100 very high level

It is alittle hard to put a graph on this page so I hope you can read that. Our allergist also said that it is a test to measure. There are people with any level that are/are not anaphalactic so talk to you doc for YOUR answer. I would also request a pediatric allergist. If this person is a good Peanut Allergy doc they can guide you on what restrictions are appropriate for your family needs. Your sons were recently diagnosed right?? I know it can seem scary so trust you instincts and get a good doc.

P.S. our DD test was 68.3

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[This message has been edited by Peanut Militia (edited March 13, 2007).]

On Mar 14, 2007

ditto. class is meaningless.

Scores are low. Nice to see low scores.

No rhyme/reason. Can be fatal with low score, or fatal with high score.

avoid avoid avoid.

test annually under age 6, and hope the scores decrease each time.

Jason

------------------ [b]* Beyond Obsessed * [/b]

On Mar 14, 2007

I've been trying to do some research on this and found that anyone who was under a 2.0 was recommended for a food challenge. My son has never had an ana reaction to pa or anything else. The only serious reaction we ever had was his eyes swelled shut and he had hives and a red rash head to toe. But this was to peas. We've avoided peas for two years and his level is a 0.43 now. So should I look at having a food challenge done on the pa? We are getting ready to start the EFMP (military moving stuff) and going the rounds about the 504 with the school, and I really don't want to have to do these things unless we have to, and his pa is a true allergy. But yet at the same time, we've avoided it for so long, I'm terrified to give it to him. This was his first RAST test and he scored a 1.89 on the peanut, 1.04 on the egg, 0.49 on corn, and 0.43 on pea. He turned 3 in December. Thanks so much.

Dani

On Mar 14, 2007

DS was diagnosed for pa, wheat, soy, eggs, and peas in July 2005 via the skin prick after his big reaction to the peas. They just RAST tested him last month. We can't really go see another doctor seeing how we are limited by being in Germany and our insurance. Right now we actually go to one of the BIG military hospitals and see a great lady. She told me about 75% of her patients are kids. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Mar 14, 2007

Yes, multiple readings will give you better indication of the allergies progression. I guess I should have added. Our daughter's firt IgE level was 24.8. Now three years later, with strick avoidance, it is rising so we know we are most likely in for the long haul and will not be doing any oral challenges. Our allergist also said it was a good indicator that we should not do the prick test for suspect foods because she has been ana. and the prick test is introducing small amounts of the item to her. This can be dangerous (although controlled) if you are testing for tree nuts, soy or other legumes.

Just a tip, we have a standing order at the base clinic so any time her blood is drawn (like when she had her tonsils out) they will do another test for the items we are watching--I hate taking her in for blood draws!!! The order will stay in the system for one year and only at that base/post. If they are only able to get some blood (not enough for all requested test) you can tell them which tests are a higher priority if they have already stuck the kid like a pin cushion and the child/you are done for the day. You can also request another tec if the first isn't doing the job. I will ask (nicely) if they are training before they start. A hot pack for the arm can also help with the blood draw.

On Mar 14, 2007

Just read your post, I guess we were typing at the same time. Overseas can make it tought getting second opinions. I understand your feelings about the oral challenge. I felt the same way when we did a contact challenge. If you do the oral, make sure they are ready for a child if things go bad and the E.R. has been notified of the challenge. Being at a 'big' hospital chances are your fine, but double check if you need peace of mind. Peds equipment is different than adult and not all bases have the same equipment. Our challenge was delayed because of an emergency appendix surgery and limited peds equipment. Our results were: on that specific day, on current meds, with trace element contact, she broke out in head to toe hives within 10 minutes, swelled, and felt miserable for a week (skin reaction), had to take steriods fr 14 days.... Her airway was not restrictd, but they stopped the challenge to give her benedryl at the 20 minute mark and observed her for 4 hours. We did the challenge to see what could possibly happen in a school setting if the area was not peanut/trace element free. It gave us ammunition for the school and could have given us better peace of mind if the test would have gone better. With that said, the test just covers how she did THAT day. Was she having a good day? a bad? To me, these are the questions that make this challenging!!!! As far as the 504, they don't have to be incredibly extensive and can be added to if the allergy gets worse. They are a fluid document. As far as the EFMP, it took us 6 months to get 'q' coded so that we are not supposed to be sent to areas that have peanuts as a major crop and english has to be the countries main language. We are trying to increase the request to include some of her other extreem ana allergies and (an additional year later) are still trying. I would have your ground work together if they try to send you to some place like Korea. I think I said this before, but-especially coming from overseas-GET COPIES OF ALL TESTS/MEDICAL RECORDS BEFORE YOU MOVE!!!! It can take months in the states for the records to catch up with you--ours were 'lost' this last move and 7 months later we only have partial records. I am sure they will turn up, but our DD has had medical needs in the meantime. I think they can have 30 days to process the request for copies. Please keep me posted on how it goes. You are asking great questions and will get the answers you need. Keep up the good Work!!!

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