Can peanut odors cause anaphylactic reactions?

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 2:24pm
Driving Me Nutty's picture
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I recall reading that Dr. Sampson indicated that it is very rare for someone to have an ana. reaction from inhaling peanut proteins. But now I can't find that article.

Has anyone read similar? or opposing information?

Here's a link to the AAAAI websit but it doesn't have any strong basis -
[url="http://www.aaaai.org/aadmc/inthenews/wypr/2003archive/peanut_odors.html"]http://www.aaaai.org/aadmc/inthenews/wypr/2003archive/peanut_odors.html[...

Thanks,
Pamela

------------------
Mom to Karissa 6/29/01 (PA>100 CAP RAST and TNA level 3)

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 6:55pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Here's some supporting information on research into inhalation reactions.
(Obtained from Dr.John Weisnagel research website at: [url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm"]http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm[/url]
More specifically under the "odor" section:
[url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm#odor"]http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm#odor[/url]
On Feb 23d, 2002, the AQAA (Association Qu

Posted on: Wed, 04/07/2004 - 2:13am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Syd's Mom:
[b]
-"Two things are very clear to me as this debate continues to develop: education and preparedness should prevail. . . In the final analysis, more objective data and proper education will help guide us in the ultimate resolution of this important debate and lower the tension in the peanut gallery." 77 (posted Aug. 1st, 1999)
[/b]
(quote from article posted by syd's mom)
Meaning: having a *good* emergency plan and increasing "awareness" possibly are [i]pivotal[/i]?
Anyone?
another quote from article:
"I e-mailed Dr. Hourihane, asking his opinion on the importance of peanut odor, and this was his response: "I am not personally aware of proven anaphylaxis associated with the smell but it is often related by parents that the child has become lethargic and clingy after entering a room with peanuts open in the room. This cannot be called anaphylaxis with any confidence. My feeling is that some people really do degranulate on inhaled exposure (Dr. Hourihane is referring to degranulation of cells involved in allergic reactions, specifically mastocytes, meaning they have a typical allergic reaction) but the reactions are minor - usually upper airway and eyes with some urticaria (hives) maybe. The major problem when exposed like this is panic especially on planes and in other confined spaces." (posted April 8th, 1999)
The paper presented at the Orlando Meeting of the AAAA&I (summarized above) has now been published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, July 1999, vol 104, 186-9."
[b]Mast Cell Degranulation[/b].
[i]noting.[/i]
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited April 07, 2004).]

Posted on: Wed, 04/07/2004 - 3:27am
Driving Me Nutty's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Syd's Mom:
[b] suspected PN exposures occurred by mouth (20), skin (8), and inhalation (14)
reactions generally occurred within 10 minutes of exposure (32/42);
reaction severity correlated with exposure route (mouth > inhalation > skin)
[/b]
Thanks Syds Mom for posting all of that! Very interesting studies. I had always assumed that an inhaled reaction wouldn't be as severe as a contact/skin exposure but this study (based on an airplane environment) indicates otherwise.
MB, I would agree that pretty mundane statement "education and preparedness should prevail" but yes, I agree. Unfortanately it only seems that United and American airlines are 'listening' to these studies.

Posted on: Sun, 06/13/2004 - 8:31am
usmcwife4ever's picture
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Joined: 09/28/2002 - 09:00

Our daughter had a pa reaction to airborne particles at the mall. It was not anaphylactic. Well, it was hives, runny nose, and runny diaper so *technically* it more than two body systems. We were in Old Navy and the peanut shop outside was cooking nuts in an open cooker, the smell got to her in Old Navy and she started reacting. The great part, our inlaws own that store. We now have to avoid that entire row of stores at the mall and I am very worried about future airborne reactions.

Posted on: Thu, 06/24/2004 - 9:50am
Lovey's picture
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Joined: 03/22/2004 - 09:00

Although this study was not with peanuts, the principles are basically the same.
[url="http://allergy.edoc.com/1997_archives/pdf/jan_97/35.pdf"]http://allergy.edoc.com/1997_archives/pdf/jan_97/35.pdf[/url]
Inhalation reactions do happen with food allergies and can be severe.

Posted on: Thu, 06/24/2004 - 4:06pm
rebekahc's picture
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Joined: 12/02/1999 - 09:00

My DS and I both have airborn reactions and technically they could be called anaphylactic if you use the 2 body system definition. I have always removed us from the airborn exposure as soon as we started reacting (which I assume most people do get the he!! out of there). Maybe anaphylaxis is "rare" or "unlikely" from airborn exposure because people get out of the situation. I believe that if my DS or I stayed in the situation our reactions could easily progress to full-blown anaphylaxis. I believe inhalation reactions are slower to progress thus giving the allergic person time to remove themselves before reaching a critical state.
My DS's airborn reactions usually are asthma and eyes swelling. I will do any or all of the following (usually at least 3 or 4 of them) - sneeze constantly, profusely runny/watery eyes and nose, face itching, eyes swelling, rash on exposed skin, lips swelling, throat itching, wheezing. My symptoms usually go away quickly when I leave the situation. DS's symptoms usually take longer to disappear.
Rebekah

Posted on: Fri, 06/25/2004 - 2:09am
MQriley2's picture
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Joined: 05/25/2004 - 09:00

That is nice to know because my allergist just told me last week that airborne cannot cause ana. I asked him if he was sure, because I could have sworn I had read here were someone had, and he said nope that it had to be touched and ingested.
------------------
Renee athma/EA
Quinton: PA/TNA/Soy/EA/Severe Asthma/whole egg/onion/cocoa bean/chicken/turkey/string beans/potato
Mykiaja: EA/asthma
Taylor: EA/asthma

Posted on: Fri, 06/25/2004 - 2:50am
mamagaona's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2000 - 09:00

I don't give a bleep what the research says about it. My dd gets a migraine when she is around the "smell" of peanut butter, even when she is not aware it is around. That is good enough for me to keep her at the peanut free table at school.
Migraine also happens to be her first sign of anaphylaxis.
Arlene

Posted on: Fri, 06/25/2004 - 4:59am
Scared Nutless's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2004 - 09:00

My dd has also had nasty reaction to peanut fumes. DD started reacting with itchy face (hives starting to form), runny nose, ear pain (which doc said indicates throat swelling), dizzyness. We looked around and there was a little boy eating pn. We didn't even know until dd started reacting. We gave benadryl right away and reaction stopped.

Posted on: Fri, 06/25/2004 - 1:49pm
Driving Me Nutty's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2003 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by rebekahc:
[b]My DS and I both have airborn reactions and technically they could be called anaphylactic if you use the 2 body system definition...
My DS's airborn reactions usually are asthma and eyes swelling. I will do any or all of the following (usually at least 3 or 4 of them) - sneeze constantly, profusely runny/watery eyes and nose, face itching, eyes swelling, rash on exposed skin, lips swelling, throat itching, wheezing. My symptoms usually go away quickly when I leave the situation. DS's symptoms usually take longer to disappear.
Rebekah[/b]
Thanks Rebekah for your input. I am also curious, was either your and your son's reaction to peanuts themselves or to peanut butter. I'm trying to differentiate between smelling the odor and inhaling the peanut proteins.
Thanks!

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