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Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 12:06am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by samirosenjacken:
[b]I know they support peanut free tables.
[/b]
maybe they need to get someone who is an "expert" in Special Education Law on their team of advisors?

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 12:09am
mom2two's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2000 - 09:00

"Tell them to stop it!"
um, ok, that should do it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Kidding aside, my oldest who is PA has never bought lunch, she brings it every day. She is an extremely picky eater on top of being PA so she basically has the same thing every day. Again, she does not react to contact or nearness of pbj.
The alternative lunch everyday is PBJ.
I forgot to add they do have a peanut free table in place for one of the grades, the only kid whose parents wanted it is in that grade. My child was so shy and had a lot of social issues when we started at this school that we didn't want to have her further segregated at a seperate table.
None of the other PA kids in the school has sensitivity to pbj being nearby or smell. So far.
I think our district uses chartwell also. Our bought lunches are 2.00$. My youngest loves buying lunch,

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 12:35am
samirosenjacken's picture
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Joined: 09/30/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
are those items [i]allowed on the menu[/i]? Or is this a "silent ban", a "ban by exclusion". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img][/b]
Gosh, I have no clue how they do it. These are usually snacks they pick. They decide if they'll serve popcorn, doritos, potato chips etc..
Here's an example of what they do. Cookies were sold as a snack. A little boy with a tree nut allergy bought them. I found out that afternoon that the cookies had a "may contains" warning label and the school didn't realize it. They have chosen to have another cookie take it's place.
Is that a BAN? I wouldn't say so. They just choose to buy a product that doesn't have the label. If they couldn't find one, I'd bet they would still serve the one with the label.
They don't make pbj on the premises, but it is available as an uncrustable. SO PB is still available, they have just chosen to serve it prepackaged instead.

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 12:39am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by samirosenjacken:
[b]
Gosh, I have no clue how they do it. These are usually snacks they pick. They decide if they'll serve popcorn, doritos, potato chips etc..
Here's an example of what they do. Cookies were sold as a snack. A little boy with a tree nut allergy bought them. I found out that afternoon that the cookies had a "may contains" warning label and the school didn't realize it. They have chosen to have another cookie take it's place.
Is that a BAN? I wouldn't say so. They just choose to buy a product that doesn't have the label. If they couldn't find one, I'd bet they would still serve the one with the label.
They don't make pbj on the premises, but it is available as an uncrustable. SO PB is still available, they have just chosen to serve it prepackaged instead. [/b]
so if an [i]alternative can be found[/i] certain items are "banned", and pbj is not allowed to be [i]prepared[/i] on the premises?
I mean, I've asked for quite some time how "bans" are implemented in certain situations.
Thank you for explaining. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 12:49am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
FAAN is not neutral on the topic of banning. FAAN is very vocal about opposing bans. There are many, many newspaper articles, magazine articles and journal articles (some that Ann M-F has authored herself) in which FAAN claims that "bans don't work". They used one very limited study to support this claim, which FAAN later removed from its website due to the criticism of the study. [b] However, FAAN continued to state "bans don't work" while not producing any data nor evidence that substantiates this assertion. [i] Nada. [/i] With no evidence, and without studying the ways in which some schools HAVE successfully banned peanuts, they still continue to assert the "bans don't work". By making this unsubstantiated claim, FAAN undermines the child's parent and the child's physician determining what is in the best interest of that child.[/b]
bold added.
I mean, [b]evidence based practice[/b].
[url="http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/epcix.htm"]http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/epcix.htm[/url]
General Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness, or content of the link in this post. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 1:07am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote: Originally posted by samirosenjacken:
[b]I guess I don't see them as "anti ban" but I don't see them as "pro ban" either. Personally, I think every parent needs to make their own decisions for their own kids based on their own needs.[/b]
Huh? FAAN is absolutely "anti ban". I hope that you'll take some time to research this so that you can be certain of the facts. Do a google search, look here on the boards; the information is available to you if you choose to look.
I think we (samirosenjacken) basically agree with one another on the topic of "bans" in principle~ that such decisions need to be made by the parent in consultation with the physician. But I hope you'll research and see [i]this is [b]not [/b]what FAAN promotes on the t opic of bans.[/i] FAAN has provided [b]only "anti ban" statements [/b]and has not provided new or [i]revised [/i] statements.. nor has FAAN promoted/conducted [i]research[/i] that objectively studies the issue of bans or partial bans in schools.
[b]When I came to the school's table to negotiate accommodations for my PA child, the school came armed with multiple articles in which FAAN states "bans don't work." FAAN was used "against" me. [/b]
This is a problem for me and many others.

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 1:14am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]**************************************************
[b]Gail[/b]: Could you share around how much "lunch" from Chartwells was costing per student?
**************************************************
[/b]
This is not *my* school district, but the prices that are stated on their Chartwell's menu are the same as at my DD's school. ( $1.60 ) My DD's school has a fresh daily salad bar that she loves. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[url="http://www.fhsd.k12.mo.us/parents/qh/lunchmenu.asp"]http://www.fhsd.k12.mo.us/parents/qh/lunchmenu.asp[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 1:36am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Thank you Gail. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Now if my school cafeteria *had* a kitchen. I mean, besides a sink and freezer/refrigerator. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] (And it's only 4 years old) I guess they weren't planning on serving food?
That said, not quite sure it would be accessible to *all* persons attending. Even if they have *one* child. One mother I volunteer with has 7 children. Four or more seem to be the "norm". But I could be wrong.

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 2:15am
samirosenjacken's picture
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Joined: 09/30/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] so if an [i]alternative can be found[/i] certain items are "banned", and pbj is not allowed to be [i]prepared[/i] on the premises?
I mean, I've asked for quite some time how "bans" are implemented in certain situations.
Thank you for explaining. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[/b]
Ok, I guess I just don't see it as a "ban" According to websters dictionary, BAN is defined as: To prohibit, especially by official decree. See Synonyms at forbid.
This isn't the case at my school with reference to the cafeteria. There is no "offical decree" and the food is not "FORBIDDEN" For whatever reason they chose not to prepare pbj on the premises and serve it pre packaged. I don't see it as a BAN. They have chosen one food over another.. that is a "ban" it is a choice and as I stated, if they couldn't find an alternative, I am sure they would have served the ones with the labeling. Maybe it has nothing to do with labeling and has everything to do with cost. I haven't a clue. But I would not say that my school has any ban in place... with the exception of my dds' classrooms. Both rooms have "banned" peanuts and nuts. It is clearly forbidden by offical decreee (and a 504 plan) that no allergen be knowingly brought into their rooms in any way.

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 2:28am
samirosenjacken's picture
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Joined: 09/30/2002 - 09:00

Gail this is what I found on google:
As an alternative to all-out food bans, FAN suggests establishing peanut-free or milk-free tables in the school cafeteria and a no-food-trading policy. Don't use food in class projects, or as incentives or rewards, and monitor the food that comes into school for class celebrations.
I'm sorry but I don't see this as a major "anti ban" stance. Just my opinion on the matter. And as I stated before, I happen to agree with them that bans aren't going to solve the problems we face as parents of food allergic children. If a school chooses to go peanut/nut free, I salute them.. I commend them.. I respect them. If they don't, as long as they are willing to allow the parents to enforce accomodations to ensure the safety of their children, I can support that too.
I saw first hand what happens when a school tries to enforce a "ban." My DD went to our kindergarten center which was "peanut free." It was the only school in the district that was. On the 3rd year of it being "peanut free" parents exploded. They were livid they couldn't bring peanut products to school. They were furious they couldn't bring home baked cupcakes to school (the k center forbid them b/c of the chance of cross contamination). An uproar occured with one parent actually stating she didn't care if a PA child ate something that had peanuts in it.. that would alleviate the problem according to her. The principal really didn't believe in the whole peanut free stance to begin with and the school is now NOT peanut free. My younger daughter attended that same school last year when it was NOT peanut free. I provided education to the parents, her class room was peanut free and there wasn't ONE complaint from any parent. They were all willing to accomodate our needs. In my opinion and from what I have witnessed, there is a clear difference when you force people and when you give them an educated choice.
Now I say we end this and just agree to disagree.
~lisa

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