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Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:14am
samirosenjacken's picture
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Joined: 09/30/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Christabelle:
[b]. What do you suppose the percentage of peanut butter and peanut-product-eating kids are per capita in a school is versus what you would find out in the environment? I submit it would be much higher.
[/b]
Well, I can tell you in our school where both my girls go, very very RARELY does a child bring a pbj sandwich or do they get one of the prepackaged uncrustables from the cafeteria. I was just there today and not one of my daughter's classmates had a sandwich or bought one. They either had something from home (non peanut related) or bought lunch. Our cafeteria does not sell anything with pb (cookies etc) and doesn't make pbj on the premises. They don't even sell "may contains" and I know this for a fact b/c I review all their snacks! So I can honestly say their exposure is very limited at least in my dd's class. Now, every child and parent in the class knows about Sam so they don't send in pb stuff. The kids don't want it, don't ask for it and actually ask their parents NOT to send it. So I can say she's safer there than other places!

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:32am
Christabelle's picture
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Ahhh then you are one of the lucky ones.
In my school they serve PB&J as the alternate option EVERY DAY.

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:44am
saknjmom's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

I do not think that FAAN should be so general in saying it gives a false sense of security to ban peanuts. For example, GUNS, DRUGS and other things are banned from schools and there are Drug free zones for them. Do drug deals still go down within the zone, do kids still buy drugs in school? I think so. Do we all feel that our kids are safe from drugs and guns while at school? Probably not.
My feeling about banning peanuts from school is that it should be considered. Especially when you consider Middle and High School where kids have more freedom and are eating in places other than a cafeteria. What about during other times when PTO meetings, Town Board Meetings, Sporting Events are going on at the schools during non school times. People are eating all kinds of stuff in many areas of the school. Moms are selling baked goods with nuts all over them and they are consumed everywhere.
If it became the norm that you do not eat nuts at school or bring them to functions, it would really make a difference in being able to avoid the contact reactions and would make them safer for our PA kids.
I allowed my son to participate in wrestling. there were probably 150 kids participating at the meets. Parents and siblings were in the bleachers. Kids seemed to be eating PB & Nutty candy EVERYWHERE. It was uncomfortable for me and my child. If there was a ban, there would be less chance for kids who are allergic to have contact reactions.

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:47am
Anne Parrish's picture
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Joined: 01/06/2000 - 09:00

The problem I have with FAAN is that they take such a one-position-fits-all approach. One of the big lessons I have learned from my child's PA (& her GT/LD status in school, but that is another matter), is that I have had to confront my trait of dismissing unusual experiences that I have not personally had as wrong/hysterical/just-plain-BS. Before the PA diagnosis, I was one of those peope who secretly (& not-so-secretly) believed that the parents who were so concerned about their children's allergies were completely out of control & should just get a life. Big shock to find out how little could trigger a reaction. So I have learned how important it is to remember that what works for me may not work for others, even though our children have the same 'PA' label to the world.
So, for me personally, I am OK w/ not having a peanut ban in my child's school. But I would not be comfortable saying that *no* school should have it & that is how FAAN's positions on the subject have been used.
And the whole 'false sense of security' thing is just a argument constructed to bolster the position they were looking to support. There is no way I believe that a PA child -- any PA child -- wouldn't be at least somewhat safer w/ a ban on peanuts in place. And, along the lines of looking at where FAAN gets its funding, I have to wonder *why* they took that position. (Having a PA child has not gotten rid of my cycnicism, apparently!)
Anne (who is going back to lurker status... 2 posts in 1 day has worn me out.)

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:48am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by samirosenjacken:
[b]
Well, I can tell you in our school where both my girls go, very very RARELY does a child bring a pbj sandwich or do they get one of the prepackaged uncrustables from the cafeteria. I was just there today and not one of my daughter's classmates had a sandwich or bought one. They either had something from home (non peanut related) or bought lunch. Our cafeteria does not sell anything with pb (cookies etc) and doesn't make pbj on the premises. They don't even sell "may contains" and I know this for a fact b/c I review all their snacks! So I can honestly say their exposure is very limited at least in my dd's class. Now, every child and parent in the class knows about Sam so they don't send in pb stuff. The kids don't want it, don't ask for it and actually ask their parents NOT to send it. So I can say she's safer there than other places!
[/b]
It's nice you have a cafeteria that sells lunch. And a cafeteria that limits peanut and nut products. It's probably even nicer when children can afford to purchase items from that cafeteria.
I'll share my situation. I won't be presumptuous in assuming other situations are as mine is. I live in a fast growing area. Actually, the growth rate is phenominal. We have two highschools in my district. Two more being built or started by 2008. A new junior high school going up. The bond for the two new high schools is $225 million. Not including the junior high. Currently the two existing highschools house nearly 7000 students.
Needless to say the schools in the district are large and highly populated. (Would you believe the school my children attend is only 4 years old and they are currently building an addition??)
Houses in the district probably range in price from 180,000 to 1.5 million. Across the street from me, even. Probably with equal percentages of price brackets. Probably more near the one million dollar mark. I'm near the middle.
Personally? I couldn't afford to feed both my children on a daily basis from a "cafeteria lunch". Don't know if I'd want to, food allergies or not. If we had a "cafeteria lunch program", that is. The "milk bill" is enough. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] To my knowledge, the grade schools, and middle schools do not have a cafeteria that sells food. Don't know about highschool and Jr. High yet.
My cubs school offers "hot lunch" (fast food (yuck) brought in for a slightly reduced cost) once or twice a month for each grade. Don't know about you, but how often does my child need Mcwhat'shisface?
So aside from the very, very, occassional "hot lunch" offering (and "treat day"---more goodies---offered once a month to each grade) one cannot purchase lunch at the K-6th grade level schools in my district, including the one my child attends. There was, however, a very limited lunch program at a school my child attended out of district previously. Don't know if it was "safe" or not, but there was plenty of Peanut butter brought in.
So, my point? Personally? I think I would find "cafeteria lunches" unaffordable for both my children on a daily basis. I think many other parents might as well. So, my situation? Parents in my district at the grade school and middle school level [i]send lunches in[/i]. Guess what? PB is a [i]favorite[/i]. LOL. Even in my neighborhood. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Maybe we are all house poor. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] I mean, I don't think it's a "class" issue either. I think a lot of families use peanut butter as a lunch staple. Regardless of what is on their W-2 forms. Or how much their home costs. Or how many cars they have for that matter. But I could be wrong.
But hey, if my children liked it,(PB) could eat it (weren't allergic), and if my school did not "ban" it (LOL-they don't), I'd probably be sending it every now and then as well. Or at least keep it around for those days when I am out of lunch meat or cheese. (My children look forward to the "sandwich" part of their lunch and are "picky eaters". ) As a child, it was often part of my own lunch. I liked it. Although as an adult, I didn't eat much of it.
But yes, it sounds very nice that you live where there is a cafeteria providing food on a daily basis and that tries to limit nuts and peanut. And where the vast majority of people can afford to purchase such. Or am I hearing you wrong? Please correct me if I am. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
~no advice.

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:51am
gvmom's picture
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Joined: 08/24/2005 - 09:00

I am only jumping in to say, that I wish I was at your kids school. Yes, we have great parents in my son's class. Nice kids, that look out for my son. In fact, that is how my son and I find out about how much peanut butter they all are eating at lunch, and how it is all over their hands -- and last week, one little girl got it all over her hands, didn't know it, and then proceeded to touch her head -- getting it all over her hair. But for the children standing in line in the hallway, waiting to go into the classroom after lunch, DS and I wouldn't know about all of the PB that gets all over these kids. This is why we still take him home for lunch. We have talked to the school, presentations to all the staff, to all the parents, fliers sent home to all of the parents in his class, taking on making food for all of the stuff that comes up, doing what we can think of, short of begging on our hands and knees for people to please not send stuff that will kill our son --- and we are met with lots of hands covered in peanut butter. Granted, that may be exaggerated, but at the very least -- once a week one kid will tell my son that they had peanut butter for lunch, and they touched so-and-so, so that my son shouldn't touch either of them (oh - but be comforted because they washed their hands).
And lastly -- as to FAAN -- I see both sides of the coin. When I had nowhere -- FAAN was at least on the other side of the phone, not thinking I was a looney tune, and had information & supplies relevant to FA's. Yes, I would like more of a voice advocating 504's from them. I mean, it would have been fantastic if they had even a little pamphlet that they sent with your order that said,"Have a child with Food Allergies -- Start Working on Your 504 NOW -- Don't Wait Until They Start School!!"
edited to add that I was responding to samirosenjacken -- not the bunch of posts that got in faster than I could type or think!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by gvmom (edited March 08, 2006).]

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:52am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Christabelle:
[b]Ahhh then you are one of the lucky ones.
[/b]
you said it better than I did. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 2:59am
mom2two's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2000 - 09:00

"Ahhh then you are one of the lucky ones.
In my school they serve PB&J as the alternate option EVERY DAY."
Mine as well, they make them there, they don't have premade and prepacked crustables delivered either.
My child is able to sit next to another child who is eating pb without reacting. Not all pa children are. The only accomodations I have seen the school make are sending home memos at the beginning of each year in my daughters class ONLY that there is a pa child in the class so please dont send in pa products. Of course the parents all send in bakery goods anyway that she cannot eat because we (nor the parents) really know the ingredients of.
Fann is fine for information, unfortunately its used as a weapon against pa parents in many cases.

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 3:02am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by samirosenjacken:[/b]
Our cafeteria does not sell anything with pb (cookies etc) and doesn't make pbj on the premises. They don't even sell "may contains" and I know this for a fact b/c I review all their snacks[/b]
Do you consider this a "ban"?

Posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 3:08am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Christabelle:
[b]
In my school they serve PB&J as the alternate option EVERY DAY.[/b]
PB was taken off the Federal Brown Bag Lunch Program offered in our district. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
One school my child attended briefly had a considerable number of participants before the option was removed from our district offering, but participation is now somewhat non-existent in the school my children now attends or will attend next year. I'm not sure if the decline was an income issue, or a preference issue. Or if there was never a significant number of participants at the school my children now attend to begin with.
~no advice.

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