65 posts / 0 new
Last post
Posted on: Mon, 08/06/2007 - 8:18pm
k9ruby's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/25/2004 - 09:00

TNA people have barley 6% chance of outgrowing. Me, my parents, and allergists are pretty confident I will not be one!

Posted on: Wed, 08/08/2007 - 5:11am
JenOhio's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/09/2007 - 09:00

Well, I haven't posted here for a very long time, but I wanted to add to this thread. We, fortunately, are one of the lucky ones. My son (age 4) recently had no reaction to his skin test, and RAST came back showing no allergy. I'll give you a brief history: He reacted at 1 with hives around his mouth when he picked up a cup with peanut residue and put it over his face. Alarm bells sounded in my head, so we never fed him peanuts or peanut products. We did not, however, cut out the "may contains" or "made in same faciliity as". I got a lot of heat when I posted here about that, but it worked for us. Not at all saying it would work for others, but it did for us. Last year we finally had him officially tested by an allergist. His RAST was low (can't remember the exact number, but it was class 1). His skin test showed an immediate reaction. We got the EpiPens and went about our lives pretty much in the same mode we had been. He still ate the same foods he always had, but never ate actual peanuts/peanutbutter. I know that seems wrong to a lot of people, but like I said, it was in our comfort zone to feed him the things that may have had traces. He has never had another reaction, and now seems to have outgrown his allergy. I truly believe that contributing factors were the lack of any other food allergies, no asthma, no excema, and no enviromental allergies. I don't know how many studies are out there, and how you decide which to believe, but I know I do believe that having, or not having, those other issues makes an impact on whether or not the allergy will be outgrown. Not a scientific opinion, mind you, just the opinion of one very relieved, very thankful, very happy mom!

Posted on: Wed, 08/08/2007 - 7:40am
mom2boys1975's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/19/2007 - 09:00

Jen- that's great!
artlvr- It doesn't mention asthma. My son has/had eczema that has almost completely gone away and it doesn't mention that either Here is what it says...
.... However, several subsequent epidemiologic and case-control studies that followed children who first manifested peanut allergy under age 2 years found a resolution rate of 18% to 21.5%. Children who outgrew peanut allergy had smaller prick skin tests that age-matched controls or negative prick skin tests, a longer interval since their last reaction (median 40 months vs. 12 months for controls) and fewer additional food allergies. (correlation with levels of IgE antibody to peanut among 85 children orally challenged to peanu revealed 67% of patients with levels below 2 kU/L and 61% with levels under 5kU/L passed the challenges. comparing those who passed oral food challenges to those who did not, IgE levels were lower at the time of challenge (median 0.69 vs. 2.1 kU/L) but were similar at the time ofdiagnosis (2.2 vs 2.9kU/L). Six patients with a negative RAST had apositive challenge and only 2 of 54with an initial IgE level greater than 10kU/L outgrew the allergy. These studies indicate that peanut-allergic infants may become tolerant, but once the allery is establishen in early childhood, resolution is rare. The importance of reevaluation of the allergy, including physician-supervised food challenges is evident.
Please forgive any typos... not the best typist!

Posted on: Wed, 08/08/2007 - 10:47am
SFMom's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/27/2006 - 09:00

My DH (age 45) thinks that he had PA when he was a kid. He hated the smell of peanut butter, and couldn't stand the feeling of any type of nuts or seeds in his mouth. His mother said he threw up a lot when he was a small child. That could have been from allergy, but we'll never know for sure.
When she was 2 years old, our older DD threw up about 20 minutes after eating a peanut product. That's how we found her allergy (narrowing down the reasons she was throwing up every so often). Ironically, she never liked peanuts. If she took a bite of a peanut butter cookie or a Reese's piece, she made a face and tried to spit it out. I find it interesting that she had an aversion to it before we even knew she had an allergy.
As my DH got older, he found that he could eat products with peanuts or other nuts (no reaction), although he still can't stand the smell of peanuts or peanut butter. He has pollen and animal allergies. He also used to be allergic to melons.
Do, did my DH outgrow his peanut allergy? Perhaps he did. It gives me hope that my DDs will also outgrow it one day.

Posted on: Thu, 08/09/2007 - 12:54am
mom2boys1975's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/19/2007 - 09:00

sfmom- funny, my ds was the same with anything pb related before we found out he was PA. He loved peanuts though. We'd go to a steak house with the buckets of peanuts and he would gobble them up!

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 1:03am
mom2boys1975's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/19/2007 - 09:00

Last night at a bbq I found out a guy we've done fantasy football with for years had a peanut allergy as a child and is fine now.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 1:54pm
kandomom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/12/2006 - 09:00

My friend's DS outgrew PA in 2004 when he was 6. His 1st reaction was as a toddler- hiveson face after mom kissed him after eating a pb sandwich.
He is 9 now and eats one peanut per day, on the advice of the allergist.

Posted on: Sun, 08/12/2007 - 2:20pm
journstep's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/30/2007 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by kandomom:
[b]My friend's DS outgrew PA in 2004 when he was 6. His 1st reaction was as a toddler- hiveson face after mom kissed him after eating a pb sandwich.
He is 9 now and eats one peanut per day, on the advice of the allergist.[/b]
I don't think I understand this statement. I know that some research shows that kids who outgrow need to continue being exposed to peanut or else there's some chance the allergy will return. But do you mean the allergist advised *at least one peanut a day* or advised only that one peanut because the child can't tolerate more? If he can eat more if he wants without reacting, then he's really not allergic anymore. If he can only tolerate that one peanut at a time on a regular basis, then that's an improvement that probably makes things easier as far as "may contain" and accidental cross contamination are concerned, but IMO, wouldn't really be outgrowing.
That said, yes, I know of people who have truly outgrown various FA, including a couple of PA. It does happen, though not as often as most of us would probably like.
------------------
(relatively recent adult onset non-ANA TNA/inconclusive PA)

Posted on: Sat, 09/22/2007 - 2:52pm
artlvr's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/01/2007 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by mom2boys1975:
[b]artlvr- It doesn't mention asthma. My son has/had eczema that has almost completely gone away and it doesn't mention that either Here is what it says...
.... However, several subsequent epidemiologic and case-control studies that followed children who first manifested peanut allergy under age 2 years found a resolution rate of 18% to 21.5%. Children who outgrew peanut allergy had smaller prick skin tests that age-matched controls or negative prick skin tests, a longer interval since their last reaction (median 40 months vs. 12 months for controls) and fewer additional food allergies. (correlation with levels of IgE antibody to peanut among 85 children orally challenged to peanu revealed 67% of patients with levels below 2 kU/L and 61% with levels under 5kU/L passed the challenges. comparing those who passed oral food challenges to those who did not, IgE levels were lower at the time of challenge (median 0.69 vs. 2.1 kU/L) but were similar at the time ofdiagnosis (2.2 vs 2.9kU/L). Six patients with a negative RAST had apositive challenge and only 2 of 54with an initial IgE level greater than 10kU/L outgrew the allergy. These studies indicate that peanut-allergic infants may become tolerant, but once the allery is establishen in early childhood, resolution is rare. The importance of reevaluation of the allergy, including physician-supervised food challenges is evident.
Please forgive any typos... not the best typist![/b]
mom2boys1975, Thanks so much for the information. I don't really think my DS1 fits into the category of actually out-growing this crazy allergy, but I won't give up complete hope. That's what it's all about, right? Hope he never has another reaction, hope he could actually out-grow this, hope that a "cure" is found for ALL food allergies, hope... Or is it just wishful thinking. All the same, I pray for all of these things.
Stay safe!
------------------
Kimberly
Wife to Joel (since 1999)
SAHM to:
DS1 (May 2003) PA since Feb 2005
DS2 (Jan 2006) KNA
[i]"With God all things are possible." ~ Matthew 19:26[/i]

Posted on: Sun, 09/23/2007 - 9:16am
Claire's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/19/2000 - 09:00

Chris age 21 is still very very allergic and has no chance from what we are told of ever getting over this allergy. They said that they had never seen a child reactlike him. I don't like to compare cases as I don't know anyone else but that is what I was told.
Chris will react from smell,touch or taste.
He was almost put on life support once because the Dr. didn't expect him to pull through.
We don't need to be retested as we have seen enough aireborn reactions to know the out come.
I guess this question is a hard one to answer as every case is different.
However let me clarify I do hope it is possibe to outgrow and hope and pray every child and adult does.

Pages

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

You already know that if you or your child has a peanut allergy you need to avoid peanut butter. Some...

There are many reasons why you may want to substitute almond flour for wheat flour in recipes. Of course, if you have a...

Are you looking for peanut-free candies as a special treat for a child with...

Do you have a child with peanut allergies and an upcoming birthday? Perhaps you'd like to bake a...

Most nut butters provide all the same benefits: an easy sandwich spread, a great dip for veggies, a fun addition to a smoothie. But not...