Bus Plan taken to the Extreme!

Posted on: Wed, 08/11/2004 - 6:00am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Several years ago, I worked with my county to establish a bus plan for children with Epipens and Asthmas inhalers. It took about a year but I am proud that as a result,the whole county adopted a plan that allows students to carry their medications with them on the bus.

My son is now in his second year of middle school and has a new bus driver. I was happy to hear that she was receptive to being trained and seemed to take it seriously.

The bus plan includes a statement about elementary students sitting in the front seat. Middle and high School students do not need to do so. My son does not want to sit in the front but this driver will not let him sit elsewhere. So far the school nurse has spoken to her, her team leader has supposedly spoken with her, I have written her a note and finally today, my son asked if he could sit in another seat yet.

Her response was, "You're a sick child, I can't be letting you sit in the back of the bus."

Now, you can imagine how I feel about that comment. I don't know what she is thinking. I called the nurse again and will let her talk to her one more time. My son really doesn't want me to come to the bus with him, which I can understand. I am hoping the nurse talking to her again will take care of it.

Any suggestions?

Posted on: Thu, 08/12/2004 - 1:57am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

raising... I need suggestions! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 08/12/2004 - 2:19am
LaurensMom's picture
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Joined: 05/23/2001 - 09:00

I haven't been in that situation though I can understand how it must feel.
Playing devil's advocate though, if something were to happen to your child on 'her' bus, she would be the first one to come under the spotlight. Maybe she just needs time to get used to the idea...a little time to get to know your son and teh kids on the bus. Maybe getting the kids to *talk* to her might help...I mean talk to her like you might a cool teacher.
If it were me, and knowing only the little bit that I know...not knowing the bus driver etc, I would ask my DD to tough it out for a bit figuring that the driver just has to get used to the idea. I would see if maybe next week he could sit in the 2nd or 3rd seat (just doing it - not asking). Maybe even move while the bus is in motion (I know you're not supposed to do it but we all did and I'm sure they do too!) with a "I'll be right back...just going to get something from Jimmy" kind of thing.
If those don't work, I would talk with someone in the bus company and ask them to ride the bus with this woman. I've seen this done when there are issues or a driver is being evaluated.
Otherwise, if all else fails and she is singling out your son because of his allergy without any real need and without support from the bus plan/company/school district, then maybe you can address it that way...that you sincerely appreciate their efforts but there is a fine line between keeping safe and singling out and then lightly suggest discrimination.
Wish I could be more help.
PS: Question - Your son is in school already?
[This message has been edited by LaurensMom (edited August 12, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 08/12/2004 - 6:33am
oklahomamom's picture
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Joined: 08/11/2004 - 09:00

One of the bus drivers at our school said she would do this because: she can see him and hear him better up front and she can get to him faster. She said your bus driver is probably very uncomfortable with this and is just wanting him close by to make sure he's ok. She also said you just have a very overprotective bus driver. Guess that's better than having one who could careless.

Posted on: Thu, 08/12/2004 - 6:56am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

I really think buses should have two bus personnel on board at all times. One to oversee, and one to drive. Oversee for many reasons. Driving a bus full of children is a heavy responsibility.
I mean, what if *there is an emergency* on a school bus. Who watches the other children. Who radios/calls for help if the bus driver is occupied with the emergency............? If someone would say: "the children", *should* that be?
LTFA aside, I think a minimum of *two* adult, prepared, obligated personnel should be on board such vehicles.
Just my buck fifty.

Posted on: Thu, 08/12/2004 - 8:15am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Thanks for the replies. I do understand that she is being very cautious. I appreciate that but I don't appreciate her comment about my son being a sick child.
The nurse did speak to her again today and she has now assigned seats for all students. My son is in the second seat. At least he doesn't feel singled out at all.
My children are in school already. They attend year round schools and started a couple weeks ago. However, our traditional schools started this Tuesday also.
I agree about having a second person on the bus but I am sure that is a money issue. Thanks!
[This message has been edited by StartingOver (edited August 12, 2004).]

Posted on: Fri, 08/13/2004 - 2:54pm
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

My dd would be devastated by that sort of treatment from a bus driver. I'm amazed that after so many people talking to her she continued to insist on your ds sitting in the front seat.
I agree with MommaBear that there should be two adults on board a school bus. How can a person be expected to drive so many kids at one time and still keep an eye on what is happening?!
Take care, Miriam
p.s. Congratulations on getting such great policies going in your county!

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