Breathing problems w/anaphylaxis

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I've been wondering about this alot lately after a couple of posts here. When you or your child had an anaphylactic reaction did you/they have difficulty breathing? If so, what other body system was involved? If not what two or more body systems were involved? Thank you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Feb 4, 2005

You know it is hard to say what systems were exactly involved in DS reaction since everything happened SO FAST. We did not have time to think.

Thankfully DS KNEW something BIG was wrong immediately after taking his first bite. He said "Were there peanuts in that?"

I saw the label, saw Peanuts and we went into action immediately, not really counting involved systems, but thinking about life saving.

In retrospect his tongue tingled, his face got red, he experienced nausea, his tongue and mouth and throat got swollen. All of that happened within the first few seconds of ingestion. This was not a may contain, PEANUT was clearly on the label.

When he had his third reaction which was airborne he felt difficulty breathing and when he spoke to me on the phone I could hear that his tongue was swollen.

If you get hives or swelling then it is very possible to get hives and swelling inside of your airway thus making it difficult to breathe.

So DS may not have had three systems affected but he surely had anaphylaxis which was halted or delayed with his epi pen.

It is possible maybe? that if you use the epi pen fast enough the second and third system might not react even if they "wanted to" but later on once that epi pen wears off they might.

Peggy

On Feb 4, 2005

Peg, thank you. I guess my fear is the school or someone else, maybe even myself may be looking for difficulty breathing before using the epi, since many think that is [i]the[/i] indicator to use it. My fear is what happens when you wait until that point.

Thank you for once again sharing your experiences.

On Feb 4, 2005

The school has to know to NOT wait for anything. Most kids die when someone decides to "wait and see"

I made sure the school knew this so they would ACT first.

Peg

On Feb 4, 2005

Peg, have you ever considered training schools in your area about dealing with students with life threatening allergies? I think you would be great.

I have stressed to the school not to wait and the nurse insists as soon as she see's hives, shes not messing with the Benedryl, she is giving him epi. I hope that is the case, and that they never need to do it.

On Feb 4, 2005

My daughter had hives, wheezing and swelling around her eyes. She did not have any difficulty breathing, and she was happy and playing. I did use the Epi, like Peg said because if it progresses it is still life threatening. I would agree NOT to wait for difficulty breathing.

On Feb 4, 2005

To emphasize the importance of not waiting this is a quote from Anne Munoz-Furlong .... "Further, deaths in school occur from lack of a well thought out plan to identify the symptoms and know what to do to get help quickly. In more than one case, the school staff called the parent, described the symptoms and tried to figure out together what to do. [b]In one case, the child died while the school staff was speaking to the child's mother![/b]"

*bold added by me. I find this really scary.

On Feb 4, 2005

Thank you Carefulmom. Now if I could ask anyones opinion, my son had what we believe was a contact reaction on his last birthday. He broke out in hives and was sneezing non-stop, and rubbing his eyes. Should I have used the epi?

On Feb 4, 2005

The below quote is from tando in the adult section awhile ago. I'll re raise the topic. This quote helped my son immensely. Although I am not sure if it helps your epi question.

I think that if you [b]think[/b] about it too much then it becomes wait and see and that is dangerous so I WOULD have used the epi in your son's case. This is tough to answer.

But the below answer from tando to my son helped him immensely.

Peg

[b]Hi Peg, This isn't a direct answer, but might be helpful for your son. After the hoopla about PB not causing contact reactions in the press this summer, I asked out allergist about it. He explained that there's contact and there's contact. For example, in the tests described (Choguy wrote a great description and rebuttal of the tests in research)-- the contact and inhalation were actually tiny exposures for a very brief amount of time. Our allegist compared this to a preschooler with arms covered with PB for a longer time while making a PB birdfeeder. Different variable amounts, much more likely reaction. If your son think's in terms of black and white, perhaps it would help him to think in terms of variables in an equation.

What's the allergen form Likelihood of exposing him to proteins How much exposure To what part of his body How long

Then he can consider the cumulative impact of those variables.

T. [/b]

On Feb 4, 2005

thanks Peg. I think the severity without breathing diff. is something I'm going to have to stress. Does anyone know of any documentation to help back this up? I am including this chart as well, which I find handy.

[url="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/111/6/S2/1601/T2"]http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/111/6/S2/1601/T2[/url]

[This message has been edited by momma2boys (edited February 04, 2005).]

[This message has been edited by momma2boys (edited February 04, 2005).]

On Feb 4, 2005

some definitions to go with the chart...

pruritus- 1. Itching, an unpleasant cutaneous sensation that provokes the desire to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief. 2. Any of various conditions marked by itching, the specific site or type being indicated by a modifying term. urticaria-

A transient condition of the skin, usually caused by an allergic reaction, characterised by pale or reddened irregular, elevated patches and severe itching, hives.

angioedema-

A vascular reaction involving the deep dermis or subcutaneous or submucal tissues, representing localised oedema caused by dilatation and increased permeability of the capillaries and characterised by development of giant wheals

Tachycardia-

The excessive rapidity in the action of the heart, the term is usually applied to a heart rate above 100 per minute and may be qualified as atrial, junctional (nodal) or ventricular and as paroxysmal.

dyspnea-

Shortness of breath, difficult or laboured breathing.

cyanosis-

A bluish discolouration, applied especially to such discolouration of skin and mucous membranes due to excessive concentration of reduced haemoglobin in the blood.

bradycardia-

A slowness of the heart beat, as evidenced by slowing of the pulse rate to less than 60 beats per minute

rhinorrhea-

persistent watery mucus discharge from the nose

On Feb 4, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Peg541: [b]

I think that if you [b]think[/b] about it too much then it becomes wait and see and that is dangerous so I WOULD have used the epi in your son's case. This is tough to answer.

Peg

[/b]

You are right, according to this chart, I should have used the Epi. That knowledge scares me though, that I should have and didn't. And then I wonder, If I made that mistake, what is to stop others at school from underestimating the reaction?

Peg, I also wanted to say that many of us moms here, myself included, have been pretty shaken up by Gina's death. You have been there for all of us, answering our questions and reassuring us as a voice of experience. I really appreciate it, and I'm glad you came back.

On Feb 4, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by momma2boys: [b]To emphasize the importance of not waiting this is a quote from Anne Munoz-Furlong .... "Further, deaths in school occur from lack of a well thought out plan to identify the symptoms and know what to do to get help quickly. In more than one case, the school staff called the parent, described the symptoms and tried to figure out together what to do. [b]In one case, the child died while the school staff was speaking to the child's mother![/b]"

*bold added by me. I find this really scary.[/b]

me too:

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum3/HTML/001491.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum3/HTML/001491.html[/url]

my post from this thread:

"[i]At one point in discussion with the particular school my cub attends, (to develop the IEP/OHI covering his LTFA as a disability), a team member wanted it written into the IEP that we (his parents) be required to carry a cell phone at all times. I thought: "Cool, I've always wanted a free cell phone". Maybe I thought wrong....... Anywhoooooooo, it's not written into the plan, but I do carry a cell phone when not at home, and the school has the number to it. I pay for the cell phone. (We're looking into a family plan for Nextels). I had forgotten the cell phone once when volunteering at my youngest cubs school. Thought it was in my purse, but it was charging in the change box in the car. Anywhoooo. *That time*....they called......I was finally tracked down in my youngest cub's classroom, volunteering.

The emergency plan for my oldest cub *does not* depend on whether or not they can contact me by phone or whatever, though I do carry a phone and wish to be contacted if he is having difficulties (and not all of them pa/treenut/lentil related). In *my* situation, it's just not *the* priority in an emergency.

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing the idiosyncracies of my own, personal, highly individual, and unique situation. IMMV.[/i]"

On Feb 4, 2005

Quote:

Peg, I also wanted to say that many of us moms here, myself included, have been pretty shaken up by Gina's death. You have been there for all of us, answering our questions and reassuring us as a voice of experience. I really appreciate it, and I'm glad you came back.[/B]

Thank you, that was nice of you to say.

Peg

On Feb 4, 2005

When my toddler had an anaphylactic reaction at 17 months, the first symptom we noticed was her breathing.

She was upstairs in bed when my preschooler gave her banana. He had pb on his hands, and she reacted to the minute amount on the banana.

We heard her cry, but it was a very soft hoarse raspy cry and she had a barky cough. Immediately, we knew she was in serious condition. We rushed upstairs to get her. Her cry was a whisper and even hoarser and raspier. She was refracting with every breath. (Her chest was caving in every time she inhaled.) Her breathing was intensely labored.

Her face was swollen, red and blotchy, and her upper lip split. She had one hive on her face.

Her nose was running. She vomited once.

To sum it up, the reaction included 3 systems and severe breathing problems.

Respiratory system: Grade 4 (hoarseness, barky cough, dyspnea)

Skin: Grade 1

Digestive: Grade 2

Cardiac: did not assess

Neurological: did not assess.

The interesting thing is that when she reacted to peanuts passed through breastmilk, she had hives and a fiery red rash. All of her contact reactions have been hives and swelling. However, when she was anaphylactic, she had severe breathing problems and only one hive and swelling.

Anne

On Feb 4, 2005

Momma2Boys, With my daughter's first (and so far only) ana reaction last year, coughing was the first sign her teacher noticed. She was taking her nap and was coughing and woke up crying. The teacher then noticed the hives on her face and her face swelling.

When the school first called me, they told me she was having an allergic reaction and I said I was on my way. I'd gotten calls before from her old daycare that amounted to false alarms, so I am chagrined to admit that I was lulled into a false sense of security (sort of a "boy who cried wolf" state). They called back not even 2 minutes later and said she was getting worse and asked me if they should administer the epi. Her dad was on his way and almost there, so I told them to wait.

Looking back on it now, I will never wait to have the epi administered. I've also learned that for DD, the breathing distress may manifest itself as a cough. During her reaction, she also got hives all over her body and her face swelled (particularly her eyes); thankfully, she didn't vomit. We still don't know what caused the reaction; she's allergic to egg (though her only reaction was hives--though it was a contact reaction) and peanuts as well as OAS to cantaloupe.

Mommabear, thanks for the Nextel plug. My husband works for Nextel. Now, you all have me thinking that we should get a phone for DD's daycare.

[This message has been edited by ceross (edited February 04, 2005).]

On Feb 4, 2005

TRexFamily, my ds woke up the same way once, barky cough, gasping for air. I never even considered it being an allergic reaction, he had a lot of croup at the time, but he was in def. respiratory distress this time. The more stories I hear like yours, the more I consider it was most likely a reaction. Thank you for sharing your story.

On Feb 4, 2005

MommaBear, how are things going at school btw?

Ceross, thank you for your story as well. The cough seems to be a common symptom.

On Feb 4, 2005

Should have asked this at the beginning, since we are discussing breathing problems. Does your child have asthma?

On Feb 4, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by momma2boys: [b]MommaBear, how are things going at school btw?

[/b]

[i]shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. no jinxing.[/i] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Personally speaking? [i]I'm glad the district lawyer was present at our most recent meeting[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

just reviewing the final [i]final[/i] draft returned to me from their attorney. We are currently operating in "good faith" and just soliding up the paperwork. (Oh, they have a tape too.) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

I think I've mentioned it, but the district is hiring (or already have) a consultant (written into his IEP and as I understand it, a Nurse Practitioner, specializing in Allergies) to help them in several areas, one of which to be making the Federal Hot Lunch Program accessible to my cub (or partly so). As I understand it, they will might be hiring other consultants as well.

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation. IMMV.

On Feb 4, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by ceross: [b]

Mommabear, thanks for the Nextel plug. My husband works for Nextel. Now, you all have me thinking that we should get a phone for DD's daycare.

[/b]

just clarifying, and not as advice in any manner or form: The Nextels would be for my family. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Not the school. Staff already have a similiar method of communication between themselves. The emergency plan for *my cub* at school is *not* dependent on the school or my child being able to contact *me or my husband* prior to acting. Although we would be notified of an event, [i]we are an afterthought[/i]. Not to say there aren't some *non-emergency* items that they attempt to contact us first for, or afterwards because of. KWIM?

If something such as a communication device my child would carry and use was deemed a contigency of the emergency plan, I suspect the school, in my family's instance, would *insist* on providing and monitoring it [i]themselves[/i], or through available resources. Sorta like the "consultant(s)" they are hiring. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I also mean, maybe they would lend an ear (pardon the pun) to a child, at a certain age, in a similiar situation as mine carrying something let's say like a Nextel, but I don't think in *my* situation, they would rely on it, or even write it into our plan. Just don't know.

I don't know if they would allow for the possibility of my child alerting *me* at home, instead of them *at school*. I could be way off. On the other hand, don't know if they would be adverse to allowing communication [b]in general[/b] between my cub and I in our unique, personal, and highly individual situation. Just don't know. Don't even know if *my* school policy is against or permitting of such devices on the persons of children, under their care, during school hours. [i]Just don't know[/i].

Only can speak for my own personal preferences that are under my own control. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Again, IMMV. Never had my *own* before.

************Back to breathing. [b]My cub has a diagnosis of asthma[/b].***************

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing what I don't know and my own, personal, highly individual, and unique situation. IMMV.

On Feb 4, 2005

Momma2boys, my dd`s one and only peanut reaction (due to a may contain not stated) looked like an asthma attack. I knew it was an allergic reaction because of the timing. She had been fine, and the cough and wheezing started right after she ate some soy ice cream. The anaphylactic reaction I mentioned in my post above was actually to egg. I guess my point is if your child has asthma and you think they are having an asthma attack, you still have to ask yourself if instead it could be an allergic reaction to food (peanuts or anything else they are allergic to). I have read that peanut reactions that look like are asthma attack are higher risk for leading to death because the person or parents think it is an asthma attack and therefore don`t use the epi. When dd had the peanut reaction to the may contain, she did not have any hives or anything else, only asthma symptoms.

On Feb 4, 2005

Carefulmom, that is pretty frightening. As it turns out, the allergist told me afterwards I should have used the epi anyways regardless. He said it would have helped his breathing (his pulse ox level was 88). So from now on I will use the epi. It honestly never crossed my mind at the time.

On Feb 4, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by momma2boys: [b]TRexFamily, my ds woke up the same way once, barky cough, gasping for air. I never even considered it being an allergic reaction, he had a lot of croup at the time, but he was in def. respiratory distress this time. The more stories I hear like yours, the more I consider it was most likely a reaction. Thank you for sharing your story.[/b]

My son came to me at maybe age 3 with the same symptoms but I chalked it up to his usual variety of illnesses. I can still see his red face. I tried the steamy bathroom but he just had to go thru it till it passed.

I just held him till it passed.

I see now that was probably PA. What kind of exposure I don't know but I am sure it was PA and feel AWFUL about that.

Peg

On Feb 4, 2005

Peg, what we see in hindsight is terrifying sometimes. I feel terrible too, and that was in our pre-pa.com days, so I was not as educated. The thing that makes me think it was pa related, the only thing that got his oxygen level up, was racemic epinephrine.

But, we did the best we could, the best we knew how. You have done an outstanding job in raising your pa son. I know how you feel though, I was just talking to dh about that night and how it still makes me sick to think about it.

MommaBear, has your son ever had an ana. reaction? Did he have breathing difficulties?

Oh, Peg, one more thing, does your son have asthma? Actually two things, I was doing lots of research today. One thing I saw that I don't remember reading before was to the effect of, how severity of a reaction can be increased with consumption of alcohol. Have you ever read that? I was just wondering how you handle that aspect with your kids as they get older. (Not yours specifically but in general)

On Feb 5, 2005

The ER doc told us it was croup and refused to treat her for anaphylaxis. We insisted that he call our ped who came in to the ER. She told him it was anaphylaxis and to treat it as such. Croup does not present with facial and lip swelling, red blotchy skin, hives and vomiting. Also, she did not have a cold or runny nose. All of a sudden, a steady stream of mucous came out of her nose. 12 hours after the reaction, she was once again a healthy little toddler with no sign of a viral illness/croup.

TBH, when she was reacting, it took me a couple of minutes to decide to give her the Epi. DH is a medical professional, and he immediately told me to get it. I would not hesitate to give Epi again. I now feel that it's better to overreact than underreact.

DD has mild intermittent asthma, but she did not wheeze during her reaction. We did give her Benadryl and albuterol right after the Epi. The hoarse, raspy cry and seal like cough are indicative of the throat swelling shut, not a reaction down in the lungs (asthma).

We didn't know that our 4 year old had decided to share his banana with his sister, and that he had pb all over his hands and clothes.

We threw out the pb on the way into the ER.

I did not know that anaphylaxis could cause a croupy cough until someone posted an excellent article here about croup. Also, the AAP's chart lists the barky cough.

I should print out that chart and keep it with me in case the ER doctor tries to treat her with croup instead of for anaphylaxis again.

Anne

On Feb 5, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by momma2boys: [b]Peg, what we see in hindsight is terrifying sometimes. I feel terrible too, and that was in our pre-pa.com days, so I was not as educated. The thing that makes me think it was pa related, the only thing that got his oxygen level up, was racemic epinephrine.

But, we did the best we could, the best we knew how. You have done an outstanding job in raising your pa son. I know how you feel though, I was just talking to dh about that night and how it still makes me sick to think about it.

Oh, Peg, one more thing, does your son have asthma? Actually two things, I was doing lots of research today. One thing I saw that I don't remember reading before was to the effect of, how severity of a reaction can be increased with consumption of alcohol. Have you ever read that? I was just wondering how you handle that aspect with your kids as they get older. (Not yours specifically but in general)[/b]

Thank you momma2boys, it is amazing the things that come into my mind at 2am and lately it has been that scene.

Yes my son has asthma but he was not diagnosed at that time. Our pediatrician was so conservative (as is my husband) he refused to diagnose asthma. We eventually saw someone else and had a puffer and allergy testing within the week!

As to alcohol, I did read that an anapylactic reaction will be faster and worse if associated with physical exercise but as far as alcohol I am not sure.

But you have to imagine that with enough alcohol in you your defenses and better judgement are down that bowl of peanuts begins to look mighty good. THIS is what I told DS especially sending him off to college. I believe he took this to heart.

My kids don't drink. I know they have tried it but they both value their self control and I think the potential lack of self control is scary enough to keep them from drinking.

Be prepared, the amount of alcohol on college campuses is staggering. Kids have to be pretty strong and pretty set in their personal choices before they leave home for college.

Peg

On Feb 5, 2005

One more thing keeping me up at night lately....

I do not want to start a thread in case DS sees this....

Last weekend I drove him back to school. We stopped at Starbucks to get me a Latte for my 80 mile drive back home.

DS ordered a Chantico, a new chocolate drink.

Here is our conversation:

Me: "did you ask about ingredients?" DS: "peanuts in coffee?" Me: "that stuff is not coffee it's chocolate, there could be anyting in it." DS: "NAH"

I ask the cashier and she says "Peanuts in coffee?"

I ask the barrista (He's in his 50's and apparently not as vacant as the cashier AND my son at that moment.) He says no peanuts.

I still held my breath as DS took his first sip. Later I emailed him and very nicely tried to have a discssion about why he would let his guard down like that. DS was extremely insulted saying that if I lived ONE DAY in his shoes I would never ask a question like that etc etc.

So I got insulted but nicely told him I have always been his biggest champion but this one time I felt he was making a poor choice. We straightened it out between us but I believe not between him and that Chantico.

How did this happen? Me and DS the two most carefully prepared people. (That's what I thought anyway) Was it the ingenue cashier? Was it the small quarters in a busy Starbucks making DS reluctant to lay himself bare in front of strangers? Was it that he really felt that stuff was just coffee? And was it just a misguided decision?

I don't know but lets use this as a learning experience. No matter how well I have prepared my son for life with his peanut allergy, things are going to happen. Mistakes will be made. Unfortunately these mistakes can be fatal. I don't need to drive that point home to DS, he knows fatal.

So he has his epi pens, his cell phone and his Benadryl. He will not hesitate to use them. That's what I can hope for.

Please don't tell him I told you folks.

Peg

[This message has been edited by Peg541 (edited February 05, 2005).]

On Feb 5, 2005

When DS had his ana. reaction to his allergy shot, his only symptoms were lethargy and chest pain. He's not a complainer so it was really my mother's instinct that put up the red flags. He was in the doctor's waiting room watching TV. He seemed droopy and slumped in his chair to me and I began to question him - it could have easily looked like he was just tired or vegging out. He said he was okay but that his chest hurt. I carried him to the nurse who also felt he was okay but took us to the treatment room just to be sure. She told the doctor what was going on. At that point she RAN back to us and immediately gave epi. Looking back, it was heart rate and dropping blood pressure. Very sublte, but deadly symptoms [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]. Within a minute of the epi DS was no longer lethargic and began to feel better.

Our action plan for school says if he's had known peanut ingestion administer epi even if there are no symptoms. If any two body systems are involved administer epi even if there has been no known peanut exposure. Also, administer epi if DS has one serious symptom for example sudden hoarsness, chest pain, facial or mouth swelling, etc. (they're listed in red on the form).

Rebekah

On Feb 5, 2005

Peg ~

Not to worry you further, but PLEASE pass this on to your son...

Peanuts in coffee?

YES!!

I had an ana reaction to espresso at the restaurant where I worked in college. No ingredients on the package (looked after the reaction). Called the distributor who said that sometimes coffee is "cut" with nuts to make it go farther. This was in 1991, so the practice may not still go on and was probably cheap coffee, but nonetheless I NEVER drink unfamiliar coffee. Also, I would think with flavored coffees (they're flavored with oils), cross contamination would be a huge concern since nut flavors are so popular.

Rebekah

On Feb 5, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by rebekahc: [b]Peg ~

Not to worry you further, but PLEASE pass this on to your son...

Peanuts in coffee?

YES!!

I had an ana reaction to espresso at the restaurant where I worked in college. No ingredients on the package (looked after the reaction). Called the distributor who said that sometimes coffee is "cut" with nuts to make it go farther. This was in 1991, so the practice may not still go on and was probably cheap coffee, but nonetheless I NEVER drink unfamiliar coffee. Also, I would think with flavored coffees (they're flavored with oils), cross contamination would be a huge concern since nut flavors are so popular.

Rebekah[/b]

Thank you Rebekah, I'll pass this on to my son, he'll get it. He needs to. I should also tell that cashier from Starbucks. Peg

On Feb 5, 2005

Peg, this is the info I found. I think that is great that your son doesn't drink. I can imagine how much more you would worry. That is scary enough on its own. Especially with another college student in CA killed during hazing.

[b]"In fact, it is impossible to predict the severity of future anaphylactic reactions in any particular person. There is no set pattern, but the severity of any particular reaction is thought to depend on:

The amount of allergen to which a patient is exposed The person's degree of hypersensitivity to the allergen. This can vary according to the health of the patient at the time of exposure and can be exacerbated by ancillary factors such as exercise or the co-ingestion of alcohol along with food allergens In general, however, once a reaction has begun and the more rapidly symptoms appear, it's more likely the reaction will be severe."[/b]

[This message has been edited by momma2boys (edited February 05, 2005).]

On Feb 5, 2005

TRexFamily, how terrible that must have been! Did you use Epi at all on your own before you went to the ER? Thank God your ped. came in and set them straight!

rebekahc, I am assuming both you and your son are p.a.? See this is what worries me about anaphylaxis; you didn't notice and the nurse didn't think there was a problem and there was a big one!

On Feb 6, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by rebekahc: [b]Peanuts in coffee?

YES!!

I had an ana reaction to espresso at the restaurant where I worked in college. No ingredients on the package (looked after the reaction). Called the distributor who said that sometimes coffee is "cut" with nuts to make it go farther. This was in 1991, so the practice may not still go on and was probably cheap coffee, but nonetheless I NEVER drink unfamiliar coffee. Also, I would think with flavored coffees (they're flavored with oils), cross contamination would be a huge concern since nut flavors are so popular.

[/b]

completely understand.

I will be making some phone calls, don't know how far I will get........

it's been on my mind for some time.

On Feb 6, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by momma2boys: [b]MommaBear, has your son ever had an ana. reaction? Did he have breathing difficulties?

[/b]

My oldest cub's reactions have ranged from barely detectable, probably even sub-clinical, to [i]full blown[/i] systemic and rapidly deteriorating. [i]Respiratory[/i], [i]to my knowledge[/i] was not always involved, [b]but[/b] I have noted it involved at one time or another in any range of reactions...... suspected, or otherwise. Sometimes, and maybe part of my cub's individual profile, there's so much vommitting going on, KWIM? Sometimes, it's swelling (massive, or localized, or massively localized). Sometimes, I'm not even able to track down the source of symptomatology in my cub. [i]Sometimes.......I am[/i]. Do I make sense? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] A venn diagram might help me explain.

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Merely explaining my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation. IMMV.

On Feb 6, 2005

We gave the Epi, Benadryl and albuterol at home. DH told me to give the Epi as soon as he saw her, but it took me a couple of minutes to agree. The reaction progressed so quickly. She went from a hoarse, raspy cry and seal like barky cough to not being able to cry within 3 or 4 minutes.

I don't know if the albuterol helped or not, but my ped had instructed us to use whenever we use the Epi. Maybe it helped prevent wheezing.

We live 35 minutes from the hospital, and I don't know if she would have lived if we had not given the Epi. I will never hesitate again.

The pediatrician had just prescribed EpiPens 12 days before her anaphylactic reaction. We did not have the Rast results back, so the ER doctor refused to consider her peanut allergic. (I should insert the banging head emoticon here!)

The EpiPen and my ped saved my DD's life. The interesting thing is that I'm anaphylactic to bees, but it took me a couple of minutes to react correctly. Never again. I know better now and especially after Gina's death.

Anne

On Feb 6, 2005

This has been a good discussion, thanks for asking the question momma2boys. peg

On Feb 6, 2005

Anne, talk about timing! Thank God you had that Epi! Oh, I saw your response in another thread, are you in Italy?

Peg, thank you, I have found it very informative and I thank everyone who responded.

MommaBear, your post brought something to mind. My non PA ds had an anaphylactic reaction to cats. Rushed him to the ER, and he wasn't having any breathing difficulties, but they found him to be wheezing. So he could've started to go into respiratory distress, but I didn't notice the wheezing.

I think sometimes things happen so fast that all you know is something is wrong, and you act. Later it may become a little clearer. I know now not to wait for breathing difficulties though!

Thank you all! Some scary stuff here you guys have gone through, I give you all credit!

On Feb 6, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by momma2boys: [b]rebekahc, I am assuming both you and your son are p.a.? See this is what worries me about anaphylaxis; you didn't notice and the nurse didn't think there was a problem and there was a big one![/b]

Yes, we both are PA. DD was PA too, but outgrew it.

That reaction is the one that I fear the most - so subtle as to go unnoticed until too late.

Rebekah

On Mar 6, 2005

raising to complement another new thread

On Mar 6, 2005

momma2boys, my apologies. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img] Great minds think alike, except mine obviously takes a month longer [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img]

I'm not even clear if I answered this question (didn't check the thread - have to get the kids in the shower).

I just noticed a comment to-day again on the board in a thread (not even clear which one, but I believe one about a child having a reaction) and I was frightened to see again that people are thinking there have to be breathing difficulties for the reaction to be considered anaphylactic and/or to administer the Epi-pen. Frightened.

Especially because my son's last anaphylactic reaction, despite him being asthmatic, did not involve breathing difficulties. I had always *expected* because he was asthmatic that he would have breathing difficulties if he had an anaphylactic reaction again, but no, not the case.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On May 28, 2005

bump,dd was dx with asthma.Keeping this in mind as we go. Great thread momma2boys!!!

------------------ Love this site Synthia

On Aug 13, 2005

raising

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