breastfeeding

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Hello! I have an 11 month old who is EBF and I just found out he has a peanut allergy (as well as egg and dairy!). I am struggling with what I can eat and have so many questions. I know I should not eat anything containing egg, peanut or dairy but what about the may contain traces of, or produced on the same equipment as...? How about when I eat out? I have been asking about peanuts/oil etc. but should I just quit eating out all together? I have no known food allergies so this is all new to me. I suspected the dairy allergy a while ago and so already am in the habit of avoiding dairy but the egg and peanut adds a whole new spin to everything! Thanks! Karen

On Jul 3, 2005

I have breastfed two children with egg, milk and peanut allergies. For myself, I don't worry too much about eating trace amounts or foods that were possibly crosscontaminated. However, eating out has proved difficult. Several times I have been told by waitstaff that a food (e.g. pasta) was egg or dairy free, only to find out later that it not! The egg in the pasta incident caused an eczema outbreak and diarrhea in my son. We have also encountered beef and chicken which were marinated in egg in an asian restaurant.

Good luck!

------------------ Mom to 6 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 2 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

On Jul 3, 2005

I think that breastfeeding my dairy allergic son was a HUGE preparation for when he started eating real food. I had no idea how much food contained dairy and that restaurants are nearly impossible. I practiced strict avoidance, but didn't worry about 'may contain traces.' It's tough and I think that's what caused me to quit breastfeeding after awhile...I really missed eating. Peanuts and eggs are fairly easy to avoid, but dairy is such a challenge! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] I'm sorry to hear you have to go through this...

Good luck!

On Jul 4, 2005

Hi there - I'm sorry to hear of your son's allergies. It's a difficult time, and there is so much to deal with! My son is 21 months old and peanut allergic. We found this out when he was about 7 months old. He is breastfeeding, but has no other allergies besides peanuts (and we behave as though he is also allergic to tree nuts, per the advice of our allergist).

I can't really help with the dairy and egg allergies, but I will give you my perspective, which is that of a very careful mom of a child with life-threatening allergies.

I find that the easiest thing to do when the child is very young is to tell people that you yourself have the allergy - sometimes it's too difficult to explain to people that you are breastfeeding and have to avoid certain foods because of transmitting proteins through breastmilk. This is only for people who you might have contact with once, such as people serving or manufacturing food. Obviously, people who are close to you will understand the real explanation, which is that you have to behave as if you have the allergy yourself, so as not to risk exposing your nursing child.

We are extremely conservative in terms of food exposure. We never go out to eat anymore. The only food that we eat that is not prepared by me is the occasional pizza (from a safe pizzeria) and the occasional fast food treat (Wendy's,usually). We have a ban on any other eating out experiences. To tell the truth, we have also curtailed eating at other people's houses, because of the risk of cross-contamination. To put it simply, no one will be a careful label-reader like yourself, no matter how they try.

I avoid any food that says "may contain" or has a cross-contamination warning. I'm just not willing to take the risk. We also have a "nut-free" house; we do not let anyone else bring food in. I'm also extremely careful to let the families of other children who we might be in contact with know about the allergy. It's SO hard when your child is little.

I cannot emphasize how big of a life-change this is for a family. Our entire existence is very different than it was before we found out about the allergy. Different families react different ways to the news, and ours is one of the more conservative. Other people choose to go on with their lives as much as possible, and confront the unknown much more frequently. We are happy with the way we deal with the allergy.

I will continue to breastfeed as long as my son needs to, for his health and happiness.

Good luck with everything - you will get through this!

On Jul 9, 2005

Karen,

Good for you for Bfing your son! I bf my dd for 2 1/2 yrs due to her allergy to dairy, soy, legumes, chocolate, nuts and avoided pn due to her brother's allergy to it. She is now 7 yrs old and only has a slight intolerance to regular milk. I attribute her outgrowing all the allergies to my bfing her. It was a very long and difficult road at the time avoiding all those foods. I wanted to give you the support from a "been there done that" mom. It is all worth it. Bfing gives these allergic kids such a benefit IMO.

In answer to your may contain traces question. I was able to add May Contain traces of dairy to my diet at around 18 mos. She of course did not eat that directly. I never ate May Contain Traces of Nut or PN as I think that is different. It depends on how severe your child is allergic to milk and eggs. But I practiced extreme avoidance for 18 mos on the dairy for my dd. Then I added yogurt to my diet and then hard cheeses. Dairy allergy is sometimes outgrown and luckily my dd *did* outgrow that in time!

"Breastfeeding the Allergic Child" is a good book. I dont of hand remember the author's name. I recently moved and my books are still in a box somewhere. I'm sure you'll find it with a search.

Your post just called out to me to give you a pat on the back and tell you to hang in there....it's very difficult to avoid so many foods....but well worth it later!

You are a great mommy! Linda

On Jul 9, 2005

Thank you Linda! I needed to read that because I have been doubting the BF. Wondering if I had switched to formula and not BF while eating nut products would my son have become PN allergic? I know it's silly because there are so many benefits to breastmilk. Karen

On Jul 9, 2005

Karen,

My allergist told me to breastfeed each of my children until they were three. He said that breastmilk is recommended for children with food allergies, as long as I was careful about my diet. I weaned my daughter at 3 yrs and 1 month (I was already preg. with my son.) She was re-tested and successfully outgrew egg and milk allergies (still allergic to peanut.) My son is 2 1/2 and still nursing. I'm looking forward to being done!

Keep up the good work! Cathy

On Jul 9, 2005

My breastfed my youngest, who had symptoms of a milk allergy since shortly after her birth. I found that I could get away with very small amounts of milk products (particularly cheese, yogurt and buttermilk) while nursing. I also avoided tree nuts and peanuts while nursing her.

On Jul 10, 2005

I bf my son until he was almost 2...he's 30 now. This was before we knew about avoiding PN during pregnancy & nursing. I ate PB & celery throughout my pregnancy and didn't avoid PN while nursing. Though he has bad EA he's not PA. But then neither was I at his age!

On Jul 10, 2005

I BFd my PA DS until 2 1/2 years. He wasn't ready to be weaned (and originally were planning to let him self wean), but there was medication I absolutely had to take that he couldn't have. No way around it. He wasn't ready, and while he was fine, it was clear he still needed to nurse. He's 7 now and sometimes tells me he remembers nursing--apparently very fondly. BTW--everything you read about the results of attachment parenting is true. DS is so incredibly sweet and thoughtful.

But I read something in the past few days (not sure if on this board or at a website elsewhere) that said that if BF is (of course) the best route to go unless there are FA to deal with (if the mother has them), and then you're more likely to cause your child to be FA if you BF. This was very troubling to me as I am (now) PA myself and always had to deal with FA, although not LTFA. I've tried to get over the guilt enough--guilt about eating nuts and peanut products while PG and early nursing (DS had his first reaction after he turned 1).

Anyone else read about this?

[This message has been edited by McCobbre (edited July 10, 2005).]

On Jul 10, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by McCobbre: [b]But I read something in the past few days (not sure if on this board or at a website elsewhere) that said that if BF is (of course) the best route to go unless there are FA to deal with (if the mother has them), and then you're more likely to cause your child to be FA if you BF. Anyone else read about this? [/b]

I asked our allergist this question over a year ago. I said that I thought breastmilk was best for allergies...she said, "oh, that's for seasonal allergies and asthma, not food allergies." I think I agree with that because I do believe everything goes through the breastmilk. Now its a question of whether small amounts of the protein are good or bad...the latest immunotherapy that Melissa is doing with her ds (under "Research") makes me question whether strict avoidance during pregnancy and breastfeeding is the answer...

On Jul 10, 2005

I'm PA & I breastfed both of my kids (11 mos. and 23 mos.). Both developed PA with absolutely no peanut exposure. I'm sure I passed my peanut antibodies on to them along with the good antibodies. DD outgrew her PA, but DS did not. In fact, DS developed every single food allergy I have plus some more of his own. IMO, if the mother has food allergies, BF'ing might not be the best choice because that's the only way my kids could have developed allergies to things they were never exposed to.

Rebekah

On Jul 10, 2005

Also, if they are allergic to cow`s milk, sometimes the antibodies cross react to the protein in breast milk, not related to the mother`s diet. That is what happened with us. My dd had breast milk colitis that immmediately went away when I stopped breast feeding. I removed milk from my diet, and started breast feeding again, and she developed breast milk colitis again. I know this is rare, but in our case the breast milk itself was actually causing the colitis. She had so much microscopic blood in the stool from my breast milk (you could not see the blood when looking at the stool, only under a microscope) that she developed anemia, so then I absolutely had to stop. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations were to only breast feed for six to twelve months anyhow. By the time we got all this figured out, she was nine months old, so I was only stopping a little earlier than I would have, as I would have followed the AAP recommendations and stopped at twelve months anyhow. Also, her ped and allergist said it is really difficult to have milk that is nutritionally complete if the mother is following a milk free diet. Her doctors and I were really worried about dd having nutritional deficiencies with me going milk free and breast feeding.

On Jul 10, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by rebekahc: [b] I'm sure I passed my peanut antibodies on to them along with the good antibodies.

Rebekah[/b]

I thought I thought of everything when it came to PA, but I have to tell you...you really got me thinking about this one!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I always thought about the protein going through the breastmilk, but NEVER thought about the antibodies going through. Very interesting. Have there been any studies on this or is it documented anywhere? Don't you think they would have gotten the antibodies while you were pregnant anyway?

I'm not PA, so this doesn't really apply to me, but...

I'm curious if my lactose intolerance may have caused my ds' milk allergy. My thinking is that I'm lacking the enzyme to breakdown the milk protein properly, so wouldn't it be a more potent protein going through the breastmilk? Just a thought..

Ree

On Jul 10, 2005

Lactose is a sugar. It is sugar that you cannot break down if you are lactose intolerant. So it has nothing to do with the protein in cow`s milk that one is allergic to if they have milk allergy.

On Jul 10, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Carefulmom: [b]I know this is rare, but in our case the breast milk itself was actually causing the colitis. [/b]

This interested me.

I quit breast feeding my first cub about 5 months into it since it was running out of him as fast as it was going in. He seemed to be in obvious pain during breastfeeding despite acute positioning, and [i]complete, if not perfect[/i] latching. Anywhoo. As his appetite increased, it literally became impossible to do nothing else besides feed him. And he remained ravenous despite this. He switched rather quickly to formula and immediately began to take [i]two quarts[/i] per day.

21 pounds at 7 weeks. He topped 55 pounds at a year, I shudder to think how I would have kept up with this. Today he is *perfectly* proportioned. "Physiologically Large" was the term the pediatrician used.

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation. IMMV.

On Jul 10, 2005

oh, and I have regularly circulating anti-nuclear-antibodies (ANA). Kinda waxes and wanes. I wonder what implication, if any this has on breastfeeding?

no advice, just wondering.

On Jul 10, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Carefulmom: [b]Lactose is a sugar. It is sugar that you cannot break down if you are lactose intolerant. So it has nothing to do with the protein in cow`s milk that one is allergic to if they have milk allergy.[/b]

There goes that thought.

On Jul 10, 2005

Momma Bear, interesting. With my dd during the short time that I bottle fed while going milk free in my diet, dd was a completely different child----went from crying almost all the time while breast fed to a happy, laughing baby while bottle feeding. All that time, I just thought she had an irritable personality. When I bottle fed, and suddenly she was a happy baby, then started breast feeding again while on a milk free diet, and she immediately started crying all the time, I felt so guilty that I had caused her so much pain. I immediately stopped breast feeding. Also, when I started breast feeding the second time (while milk free), her colitis stools which had gone away with formula came back. This was all proven by endoscopy and biopsies. The biopsy showed eosinophils which are the allergy cells----they were in her intestines during the time that she was on breast milk only. So maybe your child did have it---an actual allergy to breast milk itself. It is extremely rare---the lactation consultant said she had only seen 3 cases ever. I`m sure most of the time if a child is allergy prone it is beneficial to breast feed, but it definitely wasn`t in our case.

On Jul 10, 2005

Well now I feel pretty confused. Here is my background info. I don't have any FA at all. I eat a very healthy diet (my husband and I have an organic farm) and I truely believe I will still make breastmilk that is full of nutrients regardless of whether I eat dairy/eggs/nuts. Plus at almost a year old I think my breastmilk should be supplementing my son's diet anyway. He (and I) eat tempeh, tofu, beans, tons of fruits and veggies. In fact tonight he couldn't get enough of purslane (a salad green we grow that has the highest amount of omega 3's in the plant family). His sypmtoms have been eczema and when he ate a spoonful of yogurt he got a rash around his mouth that went away within 45 minutes without any meds. He also got a similar rash when I ate a PN butter cookie and kissed him. He has had no bowel symptoms and has had a pretty happy easygoing temperment. With all that in mind I am pretty sure I will keep BF him and avoid eating the foods he has RAST tested + to (incidentaly he tested - to dairy). Does anyone who said it would be better not to BF have any research I can read? Believe me I am feeling pretty over BFing (have had pain with it for the whole 11 1/2 months!) but thought it'd be best to continue because as I feel so paranoid about feeding him I can know my breast milk is safe and I control it (I know it's not produced in a factory with any dairy or nut products [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] I would love any articles or info I can read in either direction. Thanks in advance and thank you to all who replied. I just want to do the right thing and do evrything I can to help my little guy outgrow some of these FA if possible. Karen

On Jul 10, 2005

good for you giving your little one THE best start in life -- breastfeeding. while your food limitations may get frustrating along the way, just know you are doing a great thing for your child's health.

On Jul 10, 2005

oh, and by the way, i'm sure you are already doing this, but since you are avoiding dairy, make certain you are taking calcium supplements daily. i breastfed my dairy, nut and egg allergic daughter for 18 months. it can be done! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] good luck!

On Jul 11, 2005

Karen - Even though I question whether BF'ing is best for infants with food allergies, I will BF my next baby because I believe all the other benefits are so much greater. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I only BF'd my kids until 6 months though...but, I still woudn't change it.

Oh, and no, I don't have any research on this...just what I've heard.

Good luck! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Jul 11, 2005

Karen,

Breastfeeding a child when the mom is on a limited diet because of babies' allergies will not make your breastmilk any less nutritous! Being allergic to mom's breastmilk is extremely rare. It takes 2-3 weeks of extreme avoidance to remove all milk proteins from you breastmilk. With this said, dont look for immediate results when you remove dairy from your diet. Dairy comes in many different forms. Casein....whey....I cant remember them all! You'll have to read every label.

Please contact LLL (La Leche League)!!! I cannot stress this enough! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] They have a website. If you type in food allergies in their search you'll get tons of info about bfing the allergic baby. They are extremely knowledgeable and can cut through the myths. They were extremely helpful through my trials with my dd. Having a good lactation consultant helps too.

Remember getting all forms of dairy out of your diet and giving it 2-3 weeks of avoidance is key!

Linda

On Jul 11, 2005

When I did it, I pumped and discarded my milk for a month. So I had removed milk from my diet for an entire month before I resumed breast feeding. The colitis stools came back immediately. That was when they did endoscopy and biopsies on dd`s intestines and saw all the eosinophils (allergy cells) while she was exclusively breast fed and I was on a milk free diet. I had also been milk free for a month when she developed the severe anemia due to blood loss in her stool, that you could not see with the eye, only with a microscope. So breast milk colitis definitely does occur, but it is very rare.

[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited July 11, 2005).]

On Jul 11, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by shoshana18: [b]good for you giving your little one THE best start in life -- breastfeeding.[/b]

ooo. ouch. I'm not *planning* on breastfeeding if I get the opportunity again. But that's just me. And I could change my mind. I feel THE best start for a child of mine is one that works for the child, the mother, and the family. no specific order. But hey, I could be wrong. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I just remembered the time frame I quit breastfeeding my second child. Somewhere under four months. That's when I had back surgery. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

Anywhoooooo, I don't know what *THE* best is for cubs other than my own. And I'm shakey there too. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] I gave them life, but I wouldn't venture to say that *that* act was *THE* best. I know plenty of people who adopted. I might even be seeing a reproductive endo soon. I don't know what *THE* best is. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I never have.

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal highly individual and unique situation.

On Jul 11, 2005

Carefulmom,

My hats off to you for pumping for a month. I never could pump. Good for you for trying so hard!

My experience was similar to yours with your baby. My dd was so allergic I had to go as far as taking all milk proteins out of my diet. Soy, legumes, green veggies all have milk protein in them I was told. Sometimes even beef has to be removed to remove all milk protein from your breastmilk. It's been 7 yrs so I'm going strickly on memory here...but the soy, legumes, and green veggies I went off per her GI specialist who said they carrying the protein. Beef is interesting and I went beef free for only a couple months. This all helped her and I was able to continue to BF. Sometimes this is just too much for mom. My motivation was my PN allergic son. I was just very determined with her and figured if she couldnt tolerate my BM the chances of a formula were slim. I do realize that there are some babies that do fine on a Milk free formula. But I wasnt given a guarantee from her Dr.s and all were supportive of me bfing. There are some Dr.s out there that would just as soon have mom just give formula. It's just a personal preference.

My dd's symptoms were noticeable blood in stool, diarhhea, excema, swelling of eyes, UTI's. These were all symptoms with traces of...

Anyway, I tho't some woman might be interested in how much milk protein I personally had to remove from my diet to benefit my dd. It's not always this extreme....

Linda

On Jul 11, 2005

mommabear, i ABSOLUTELY agree with you. i would tell you, as well, that you are giving your child THE best start in life too. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Jul 11, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by shoshana18: [b]mommabear, i ABSOLUTELY agree with you. i would tell you, as well, that you are giving your child THE best start in life too. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img][/b]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Jul 11, 2005

H20baby, I`m not sure why you were told that Soy, legumes, green veggies all have milk protein, because that is definitely not true! If it were, all of us with milk allergic children on this board would not be giving soy, green vegies, beef to our kids. Wow, I`m amazed that a physician actually told you that. In our case, she could only tolerate a formula ordered from a lab in Maryland. It was not sold in the store. She could not tolerate Nutramagen, Pregestamil, etc again because those had chopped down milk proteins.

I was not thrilled about pumping and discarding for a month, but when the lactation consultant, peds GI doctor, and allergist all said it would take two to three weeks of pumping and discarding to get rid of all the milk protein in my milk, I decided to do it a little longer to be really sure. I knew this way if she did not tolerate my milk on a strictly milk free diet, I could be really sure that there were no options other than the formula from the lab in Maryland. The endoscopy with the eosinophils proved it to be breast milk colitis and nothing else.

On Jul 11, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Carefulmom: [b]The endoscopy with the eosinophils proved it to be breast milk colitis and nothing else.[/b]

are you referring to a [i]Gold Standard[/i]?

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

On Jul 11, 2005

Carefulmom,

It's been 7 years since I've been there....but I do remember I had articles online supporting the milk proteins in legumes, soy, and green veggies. I'm ignorant to the whys or how it's even possible. It's just something that worked for dd to remove them from my diet. I will try when I have time to locate supporting info on that. It is interesting that an allergic individual wouldnt be allergic to those also if this is the case. I know at the time her GI dr and allergist along with her ped. agreed to remove them.

Years ago, I ran a Breastfeeding and Diet support board on ParentSoup and had collected much info on bfing an allergic baby. Somewhere I ran across info that supported this info. Not sure if I can find it now....but would be interested in sharing info. But, it pretty much pertains to bfing a milk allergic child and not anything other than that. But, I'm curious and will research the whys when I can....

Linda

On Jul 11, 2005

... what?

I hate getting into debates... especially BF'ing vs formula feeding...

But theres always someone that says 'BF is best' or 'the best start is BF'ing'

I gotta say something about our f'in unique and highly individualized situation (if I may borrow that term)

BF'ing pretty much sucked for us, and do I dare say, made the alelrgy situation WORSE.

Did it cause it? No. I dont believe that... But I bet it HURT the situation.

Take a note from OUR situation folks.

BF'ing CAUSED problems, and was NOT the best choice for OUR situation. And don't insinuate that because we didn't BF longer than you (or over 1 yr or 2 yrs, or whatever) that OUR child isn't as 'smart' or 'good enough' or whatever.

I'm tired of hearing about BF'ing being best.

We have 2 children that were NOT BF, and they have NKA's -- NONE, not even peanut, like their mother. They could eat PB&J till the f'in cows come home, and NOT react.

Our third child WAS BF, and, according to the best of the best docs, at BCH, shes termed 'multiple life threatening food allergies' -- MULTIPLE. Do you read that?

BF'ing advocates can spout off about whats 'best' for the majority of kids.. fine, go ahead.... But let me introduce you to OUR family...

If we had formula fed, instead of BF, regardless of what formula, Caitlin would have LESS allergies... I believe that much.

But go ahead... talk amongst yourselves about this, for I won't delve into it anymore... But if people are gonna comment on about whats best, I'll be more than happy to throw my 2 cents in, and sawy what SHOULD have been best for OUR unique situation.

Conclusion: we breastfed Caitlin, and NOW we suffer for it.

No, thats not entirely right. And I dont believe that, entirely... But I'm in that f'in transitional period again

Jason

------------------ [b]* Obsessed * [/b]

EDITED TO ADD:

And afaik, soy has no dairy in it... Caitlin would be QUITE dead at this point. Period.

[This message has been edited by jtolpin (edited July 11, 2005).]

[This message has been edited by jtolpin (edited July 11, 2005).]

On Jul 11, 2005

sorry for this thread. I just wanted some support, did not intend for anyone to feel judged or offended. I just recieved an email from my Dr. I redid the immunocap RAST because my son tested weak positive to a nut panel (peanut, hazelnut, brazil nut, almond, coconut) and after 2 maybe reactions (a mild rash and welt after a kiss from me maybe and a random reaction at a daycare after they had pb & J for lunch) I assumed the worst and thought it must be the PN. Well his rast came back neg for peanuts and neg for cassein. Overall IgE was low as well. So who knows what his eczema and mystery rashes are ? I feel still a little worried as all of us parents trying to do the right thing do but a huge relief. AGain I am sorry for any hard feelings. I am a breastfeeding advocate but in no way judge those who choose not to. We are all trying our best. That's why we are all here on this board. I thank you all for your feedback and hope not to have to return (after my latest results) Karen

On Jul 11, 2005

I belonged to my local le leche thingy, but thats because I was a long term breast feeder, for me pregnancy was a pain, and I hated it but my boobs worked very well.

However i did not agree with many of the views of the members, I found it difficult to join in conversations with mothers who are totally against immunisations , and when i asked questions that disturbed them like, 'have you seen a child with whooping cough and seen the resulting brain damage'?

Well, it didnt go down well. One mother spouted of about her child nearly being forced to have a tetnus injection. Child cut hand in a muddy field and needed needlework, nurses advised a jab, but mother thought that breastfeeding and her own immune system would stop her from any illness. ( when she told us about squirting some milk on to cut , I tried really hard not to laugh! )

In so far as allergy awareness goes, they were hopeless, for a group that spouts on about breastfeeding making sure that allergies didnt develop they didnt have a clue. When one vegan mother said that she had started putting whole nuts in to her childs pockets as they didnt eat very well , I pointed out the dangers to other allergic children in the school. She didnt understand.

I started breastfeeding my own children because I was a nanny and worked in a day nursery for years and couldnt stand the thought of washing another billon bottles, i also wanted to save money. If I couldnt do it, bottle feeding would have been fine.

For all the bottle verses breast, when you stand in a school playground try to pick out the breast fed from the bottlefed. Impossible!

IMO good bottle feeding is hard work, ( I have seen bad bottle feeding, many many times) breastfeeding once you have cracked it, is very lazy mothering!! I wanted my hands free to eat chocolate !!!

( on an interesting side note,and possibly repelent info for some, I have always had sensitive skin, and an abundance of milk. If i brushed my teeth with no clothes on and milk dripped on to my toes, I would get a blob of eczema on each one!!)

Well, my Gp thought it was funny!

sarah

On Jul 11, 2005

good god. when i said -- good for her doing the best for her baby i was trying to be supportive to a women in a difficult situation (i.e. dealing with multiple food allergies). as i said to mommabear -- she is doing the best for hers as well. so all of you with bf'ing vs. bottle hang-ups, let's not forget about the person who was looking for a little guidance and support.

On Jul 11, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by shoshana18: [b]good god. when i said -- good for her doing the best for her baby i was trying to be supportive to a women in a difficult situation (i.e. dealing with multiple food allergies). as i said to mommabear -- she is doing the best for hers as well. so all of you with bf'ing vs. bottle hang-ups, let's not forget about the person who was looking for a little guidance and support.[/b]

Well, answer her original Q then...

Quote:

I am struggling with what I can eat and have so many questions. I know I should not eat anything containing egg, peanut or dairy but what about the may contain traces of, or produced on the same equipment as...? How about when I eat out? I have been asking about peanuts/oil etc. but should I just quit eating out all together?

There are studies that show 'may contains...' sometimes DO contain the allergens mentioned...

Your best bet, if you want to be 100% vigilant, is completely avoid the 'may contains...' and go to a very strict diet.

Some people do. Its possible.

We don't. We do EAT some of the may contains... and survive just fine.

We do NOT go out, however. We have too many more limiations thatn JUST nuts/peanuts, kwim? I have heard from other parents that do very well, going out to eat, but asking a LOT of Q's from the establishments, including the mgr, chef, etc..

It's not something to take lightly.

Jason

------------------ [b]* Obsessed * [/b]

On Jul 11, 2005

please do not tell me how to be SUPPORTIVE. people were offering her a lot of good suggestions. i just wanted to add a little pat on the back. no need for you to be rude to ME.

On Jul 11, 2005

Thanks everyone. I feel like I have enough info now. I never knew breastfeeding would be such a hot topic! After my latest RAST results (neg to peanuts and neg to casein and neg to egg yolk - low positive to egg white) I am feeling like I will not intentionally expose my child to dairy egg or PN but not worry about produced in a factory with... As far as myself, I will avoid nuts because after this last scare I want to do everything I can to prevent a PN allergy from developing but will not worry about the dairy and egg. Hats off to all of you living with an ana. allergy. It is so scary and so much work. People who don't have to deal with it have no idea whatsoever. I am in nursing school and after this experience I will surely try to incorporate some public health education to my community about FA. Thanks again - let's put this topic to rest (it's gotten way off topic from my original question!)

On Jul 11, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by shoshana18: [b]good for you giving your little one THE best start in life -- breastfeeding. while your food limitations may get frustrating along the way, just know you are doing a great thing for your child's health. [/b]

And how should I interpret THIS then... What is the OP was Q'ing herself on BF or bottle feeding.. You telling her 'THE best start in life -- breastfeeding'...

Wheres the other side of this arguement? What if BF'ing was hurting her child.. would you still argue the cause?

I think going to neocate for Caitlin was 'doing a great thing for your child's health'. Am I a bad parent for going to formula? The answer, most defiantly, is 'NO'

------------------ [b]* Obsessed * [/b]

On Jul 11, 2005

i wasn't trying to offend anyone -- just give a person a little encouragement. THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR MAKING ME FEEL LIKE A COMPLETE ASS. I WILL NEVER, I MEAN NEVER, POST ANOTEHR THING ON THESE BOARDS AGAIN.

On Jul 11, 2005

please don't stop posting. Your encouragement was really helpful to me. It was definately something I needed to hear. Thank you! Karen

On Jul 11, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by mom2mathias: [b] I never knew breastfeeding would be such a hot topic! [/b]

say it isn't so. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003774.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003774.html[/url]

On Jul 11, 2005

oh dear, did this thread go t*ts Up? was it something I said?

shame. hot and cold boobs all round.

sarah

On Aug 10, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b] ooo. ouch. I'm not *planning* on breastfeeding if I get the opportunity again. But that's just me. And I could change my mind. I feel THE best start for a child of mine is one that works for the child, the mother, and the family. no specific order. But hey, I could be wrong. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[/b]

aiychewawa. guess I changed my mind. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] four months into this and now she's [i]teething[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

Anywhooo came across this:

[url="http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2006/03/030606.stm"]http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2006/03/030606.stm[/url]

to quote:

[i]

"Risk of Peanut Allergy Associated with High Household Exposure to Peanut in Infancy Exposure to peanut during infancy promotes sensitization, but low levels may protect atopic children, according to a new study presented today at the 2006 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) in Miami Beach.

Adam T. Fox, MD, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom, and colleagues hypothesized that peanut sensitization occurs as a result of exposure. The study was a survey of children with suspected peanut allergy and also looked to see what affect early exposure to peanuts had on the children for later allergy. Questions on the survey ranged from how much peanut the mother ate during pregnancy to how much peanut was eaten by other family members during the child's first year of life. Exposure was compared in three groups of children of the same age: Children with peanut allergy, children with egg allergy but not peanut sensitized and non-allergic children. The average weekly peanut consumption for the allergic children was 77.2g, while the totally non-allergic children averaged 29.1g.

The study concluded that exposure to peanuts during infancy promotes sensitization, and that low levels may protect atopic children. [b]In addition, researchers didn't observe any signs that mothers eating peanuts during pregnancy or breast feeding lead to the children developing the allergy.[/b]"[/i]

bold added.

GD: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness, content, or applicability of the link in this post. IMMV.

On Aug 10, 2006

Hurmph.

------------------ [b]* Obsessed * [/b]

On Aug 10, 2006

I think its funny this is still being replied to. I am still breastfeeding by the way and now I want to wean because he is over 2 and I am ready to eat again. And I was wrong about the negative tests = no allergies. He is anaphylactic to eggs and who knows what else because we are in strict avoidance. Thanks all for your support to continued breastfeeding - I have loved breastfeeding my toddler and am so glad I waited to wean.

On Aug 10, 2006

I was glad to find this thread. Even thought it caused some debate, I found it very helpful. I am currently breastfeeding my 8 mo DD who is egg and soy allergic. I am avoiding pn/tn/egg/soy/fish/shellfish/all legumes, and seeds. It has been really difficult to find a healthy variety of things to eat. (thank God I can still eat dairy) But hearing that some of you have done it for as long as 2 years and more is encouraging. For those of you who continued past 1 year, did you loose a ton of weight? I have lost 60 pounds in 8 months and find it hard to maintain my weight. I'd love to keep nursing past 1 year, but don't know if it's good for my health to remove so many things from my diet. (I have no food allergies , my 4 year old son has multiple - pn, tn, soy, sesame, legumes.) I also have another strange question. Could avoiding all of these foods for a long period of time cause ME to become allergic to any of them? Not really worried about the nuts, as we are a nut free house anyway, but I do plan on eating fish again when I am done nursing.

We see the allergist again in Sept, I plan on asking about this.

On Aug 10, 2006

I would relactate and donate to a bank if I thought I would/could lose 60 pounds!! I so hoped bfing would be my cure for the extra baggage I had even before having children. I did lose babyweight with no effort.

Didn't do that(major weight loss) for me. I had low supply and needed to eat heartily to keep a minimum up. I would dry up if I lost a pound or cut my intake.

Edited to add my support to those persiting in breastfeeding. I bf'd dd for 23 months and ds for 13(he was done) and It was best in the end with dd. She was so hard to feed, and really it was only pleasant for me in the end, when she would happily nurse to sleep at bedtime and naptime and that was it! But I did eat alot of peanut butter durning the pregnancy and breastfeeding up until I knew of her allergy at 18 months. becca

[This message has been edited by becca (edited August 10, 2006).]

On Aug 11, 2006

I should add that I believe the ONLY reason I am loosing so much weight is due to the strict elimination diet. It has always been hard for me to loose weight in the past, and I've never been a skinny person. But with no eggs or soy, most of what I eat is meat, fruit, and vegetables. Kind of like the adkins diet. Funny how if I were dieting for myself I wouldn't be so motivated and would totally cheat. But for my child I am completely careful and obsessive about what I eat!

On Aug 11, 2006

I was too, and found I ended up binging terribly and gaining after ds to make up for what I felt deprived from having. It was not good. Now I have bad habits to break! Giving up dairy for a long time led me to bad fatty and chocolate cravings. Then, when he tolerated it in my diet, I went crazy on pizza, and qusedilla snacks(just homemade tortillas with cheese)!

Oh, well. becca

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