Breast Feeding and PA Poll

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 2:27am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Hi everyone,
When my son was diagnosed with PA, I was asked if he was breastfed. The Ped/allergist said, although still inconclusive, the have suggested a link between a preg/nursing mom's diet and allergies (PA in our case) I was wondering how many of you with PA children also breastfed. Logan is 22 months old and is down to nursing once /day (bedtime) I craved PB when preg (ate it by spoonfuls) and ate lots while nursing, until I found out there could be a link....just curious on the number of people here who did also. Thanks

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 2:41am
MeCash's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2001 - 09:00

My first son, now 7 and PA, would not breastfeed (he is also Asperger's). My step-son was born with aortic valve stenosis and had open heart surgery at 6 days old. Needless to say, he was not breast fed either. So, when my daughter was born 2.5 years ago, I opted not to breast feed. I didn't think it was fair to the two older brothers who couldn't be breast fed. She is also PA.
One of the only things I could eat without becoming nauseous during both my pregnancies was peanuts or peanut butter. I consumed more peanuts during my pregnancies than you can imagine.
Since there is no history of food allergies in my family and neither I nor my children were breast fed, I tend to believe that it was all the peanuts I ate during pregnancy which led to the allergy...
Just my thought.
~Melanie

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 3:06am
maggie0303's picture
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Joined: 04/14/2003 - 09:00

I breastfed my dd for 13 months and ds for 10 months (in hopes to reduce allergies). I also craved pb during my pregnancies. DD allergic, DS not yet tested.

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 3:08am
pjpowell's picture
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Joined: 12/16/2002 - 09:00

My 18 month old PA daughter is still breastfeeding. I did not really eat that much peanut butter while pregnant or during early breastfeeding. Maybe once or twice a month.
Paula
[This message has been edited by pjpowell (edited May 22, 2003).]

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 3:09am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

DD was breast fed exclusively for the first five months of her life- *no* supplementation other than the four ounces of soy formula the hospital gave her (that we had previously requested in writing that they NOT do). I wonder about that dose of soy now.
She was not "weaned" until she was 14 months old. This was done entirely with expressed milk, since dd would not breast feed after she was three months old. This was hellish, to put it mildly, since I worked very long and erratic days as a professor at the time and could not do some of my own laboratory work because I was breast feeding my daughter. Finding forty minutes to pump in the middle of each day was awful- I added up once how much time I spent with a breast pump that year... yowza. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] If dd had NO allergies, this all would have been worth it to me- no question...
(bitterly) We did this to "protect" her from food allergies. I even asked about avoiding certain foods and was told not to be silly. I have sometimes wondered if this didn't make the problem worse than it would otherwise have been.
(Sorry, but this is one subject that just breaks my heart. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] )
[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited May 22, 2003).]

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 3:50am
becca's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Corvallis' Mom, I also tried to bf exclusively for health and allergy reasons, but was not educated on peanut allergy being passed in breastmilk and during gestation. I stayed at home, and *still* had to pump a couple of times a day simply to boost my milk and to continue breastfeeding. We actually finally got into a groove at 11 months and then dd kept breastfeeding until 21 months!
I was very diappointed when she had egg and peanut allergies. I did eat PB alot while pg and during breastfeeding. However, she only had 2 colds in her life prior to weaning totally off the breast. Not sure if it is coincidence or not. becca

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 4:18am
StephR's picture
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Joined: 02/03/2003 - 09:00

My son, Cody, will be 1 year in June and is still breastfeeding. Peanut butter and peanut products have always been my fav foods. Up until his allergy was discovered I would eat at least 1 pb&j a day (I was addicted!), and then I gave it up to continue to breastfeed him. I was told be a nurse at his new allergists office that the proteins are not passed through breastmilk and that he wasn't even allergic to peanuts at all (she had phoned to give me blood test results), so I added peanut butter back into my diet. The next day Cody started having (sorry to be so descriptive) mucosy bm and hives, so I don't beleive that it's not passed through breastmilk. Considering he has reacted this way whenever I have eaten p-nut products is just too much of a coincidence.
~Steph

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 4:35am
Sarahfran's picture
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Joined: 06/08/2000 - 09:00

Yes, I breastfed my DD and I'm pretty certain that her exposure to peanut protein in my breastmilk sensitized her and led to the allergy. I was a pretty heavy peanut eater both during pregnancy and lactation. There was no family history of food allergies, so I wasn't worried about it (stupid me: there WAS a family history of other allergies and I didn't realize that that tendency could lead to food allergies).
Covallis Mom--interestingly, my experience was somewhat like yours. My DD abruptly weaned at seven months old, so for health reasons, I pumped exclusively until she was just over a year old. That got really old, really fast. I didn't count *time*that I pumped, but at the end of the year, I figured out how many *ounces* I had pumped. I forget what it was now, but I know it was enough to make any cow proud!
When pregnant with my DS and while nursing him (he weaned just last month at 25 months old!) I avoided peanuts entirely. He appears to have no food allergies, but we still keep him away from peanuts (just in case, and also because when is he going to eat them? He and his sister move as a unit through life at this point, so he's rarely away from her and out of the house to eat separately from her).
Even knowing what I do now, I still am glad that I breastfed my DD. Who knows?--she may have had the allergy anyway! But I do know that the breastfeeding had many other benefits (i.e. she also had reflux and breastfeeding is better for dealing with that). I'm just glad that I was more educated when baby #2 came along and that doctors are educating first-time moms better.
Sarah

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 4:36am
Danielle's picture
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Joined: 04/08/2003 - 09:00

I threw up for 9 months both times I was prego and one of the only things I could keep down was pb so I ate a lot of it and nuts. I also ate a lot of it when I was breastfeeding my first child because I didn't know better. Now I have a 5 1/2 month old and I don't eat nuts or shell fish. I am hoping that she is not allergic but I did eat pb and nuts while I was prego with her and the first 3 months of breastfeeding until I found out about her sisters allergy. We do have a lot of allergies on both sides of our family so I don't know if there is a correlation but in my gut I feel that there is.

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 4:56am
Driving Me Nutty's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2003 - 09:00

One hot topic here. I also breastfed my DD until she was a year. I wasn't big into PB during nursing but I had almost daily PB&J sandwiches when pregnant.
I had read warnings when pregnant about food allergies but since there is no family history of them I wasn't worried about it. Only I didn't realize at the time the correlation between a family history of asthma and other environmental allergies and the tendency to have food allergies.
SO many studies out there about this. One that I read recently mentioned that Peanuts during the 1st and 2nd trimester was okay but not during the 3rd... Can't remember why though.

Posted on: Thu, 05/22/2003 - 5:35am
robinlp's picture
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Joined: 05/14/2002 - 09:00

I breastfed my PA son until he was 12 months. I too craved PB when PG and while breastfeeding. :-( I also breastfed my 5 year old daughter but rarely ate Peanut Butter and she has no allergies. I am currently breastfeeding my 4 week old and I am making sure to stay away from any nut products and eating a variety in the rest of my diet.

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