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Posted on: Wed, 02/03/1999 - 12:58pm
clara's picture
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Joined: 01/17/1999 - 09:00

<p>Tracy, I would suggest contacting your local pharmacist/family doctor to check on the EPI JR. pen. It only gives a single dose of .15mg which is a lot easier to deal with then getting air bubbles out of a needle. I was prescribed needles at the hospital but went to my family docter to get a prescription for an EPI JR. My daughter was 24 lbs at the time. Haven't had to use them yet (avoidance at home is easy). At this home page there is a link to the makers of the EPI Pen and information on anaphylaxis. </p>
<p>Stay safe... </p>
<p>------------------</p>

Posted on: Wed, 02/03/1999 - 1:01pm
clara's picture
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Joined: 01/17/1999 - 09:00

<p>Tracy, I would suggest contacting your local pharmacist/family doctor to check on the EPI JR. pen. It only gives a single dose of .15mg which is a lot easier to deal with then getting air bubbles out of a needle. I was prescribed needles at the hospital but went to my family docter to get a prescription for an EPI JR. My daughter was 24 lbs at the time. Haven't had to use them yet (avoidance at home is easy). At this home page there is a link to the makers of the EPI Pen and information on anaphylaxis. </p>
<p>Stay safe... </p>
<p>------------------</p>

Posted on: Wed, 02/03/1999 - 1:13pm
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Joined: 01/24/1999 - 09:00

<p>tracy wrote: </p>
<p>>Our allergist is extremely busy and hasn't >been able to talk to us about what this >means. (We have another appt with him in >2 months, during which time I hope he'll >answer our 4 billion questions.)</p>
<p>If I were you, I'd get another allergist. My son marks at 4 and he has a very serious peanut allergy. If you're lucky enough to find a pediatric allergist, I'd recommend going that way. I have the best pediatric allergist in the world (okay, I'm exaggerating maybe a little :-) but he gives all his peanut allergic patients a special number where we can reach him anytime day or night. And this doctor of yours is going to wait two months before he even discusses the dangers. Get another doctor.</p>
<p>Noreen</p>

Posted on: Wed, 02/03/1999 - 11:57pm
tracy's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

<p>Noreen,</p>
<p>Yes, my husband and I have discussed finding another doctor. We're trying to locate a good pediactric allergist; the allergist we currently have was recommended by our pediatrician.</p>
<p>We are located in Austin, TX, so if anyone has recommendations -- even someone outside of Austin, I'd love to hear them. I'm willing to pay more money for good care, so that's not an issue.</p>
<p>Thank you,</p>
<p>Tracy</p>

Posted on: Thu, 02/04/1999 - 6:42am
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Joined: 01/22/1999 - 09:00

<p>I would also suggest you get a new allergist. 2 months is too long to wait for an appt. and you should have been prescribed several epi-pens jr. (that is what i have for my 20 lb. daughter).</p>
<p>For answers to technical/medical questions you should contact FAN and/or the National Jewish Medical Center (1-800-222-5864). They have nurses who will your answer questions. And they can give you referrals to allergists in your area.</p>
<p>My daughter scored a 4+ on the skin prick test and according to the 2 pedi-allergiests we have seen, the rating does NOT predict what kind of reaction a person will have. A "4+" may get hives and a "2" may have anaphalaxis and of course vise versa. Also, each reaction can be different: the next reaction can be worse, same or milder. The bottom line is there is no way to predict what kind of reaction one will have regardless of age, rating or type of exposure (ingestion, airborn or residue, the 2 latter being supposedly less likely to cause severe reactions).</p>
<p> You need to start with a good doctor and read all the medical literture you can get your hands on but be carefull of some of the stuff you read on the web.</p>
<p>Good luck.</p>

Posted on: Fri, 02/05/1999 - 7:39am
tracy's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

<p>Brenda (and everyone),</p>
<p>We've made an appt with another pediatric allergist who was recommended by 3 different people, so hopefully we'll receive more attention regarding our son's peanut allergy.</p>
<p>Regarding the Epi-pen Jr., we were told by 2 different doctors separately (our current allergist and our pediatrician) that the dose is too much for our 20.5 pound son. Our pediatrician went ahead and prescribed 1 for us to allow our nanny (who doesn't speak English very well and her eyesight isn't great) to use, but told us to use the syringes and measure out the exact dose in all other cases.</p>
<p>If anyone else has information on this, it would be useful to know. We'll ask the new allergist about this too. I appreciate these 2 doctors being careful, but I also realize that having to measure out an exact dose could cause a delay which may do more harm than just administering a bit too much epinephrine through the epi-pen jr.</p>
<p>Also, I agree about being careful regarding reading information on the web... I've realized that I get very emotional after reading some of the horror stories. And every article I've found starts out, "Peanut allergies are the most fatal of food allergies." Sheesh. That's probably true, but let's compare the chance that our kids will die in a car wrecks to the probability they'll die from the peanut allergy. (Doesn't mean I'm going to relax my guard here, but I want to keep things in perspective.)</p>
<p>--Tracy</p>

Posted on: Fri, 02/05/1999 - 11:34am
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Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

<p>my son has only had the skin prick test. His wiel was 20 x 20 which from the literature I have determined that anything in excess of +5 is a mega allergy; however, the allergist did not elaborate on this. I already had the epipen prescribed to me from an episode last year which I do presume as anyphaltic (SIC). My son sneezed profusely, threw up. had hives, and coughed. Can anyone elaborate on the wiel or on his initial exposure?</p>

Posted on: Fri, 02/05/1999 - 12:02pm
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Joined: 01/24/1999 - 09:00

<p>tracy wrote:</p>
<p>"And every article I've found starts out, "Peanut allergies are the most fatal of food allergies." Sheesh. That's probably true, but let's compare the chance that our kids will die in a car wrecks to the probability they'll die from the peanut allergy. (Doesn't mean I'm going to relax my guard here, but I want to keep things in perspective.)"</p>
<p>It depends on the child and the severity of the reaction. I would say a child with an anaphylactic, airborne allergy has more of a chance of dying from a peanut allergy than from a car accident. For my son and my perfect driving record, he probably has more of a chance of ingesting peanuts than we have of getting into a car accident. </p>
<p>But to put things into prospective, many peanut allergic children (including my son who tested at 4) might have died if they had not received the Epi-Pen or prompt Emergency Room treatment. It's a scary situation but it can be managed effectively.<br />
Be sure and read the archives on this group. The more you read, the better you'll be prepared to prevent an accidental ingestion.</p>
<p>Noreen</p>

Posted on: Fri, 02/05/1999 - 10:59pm
terry's picture
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Joined: 01/16/1999 - 09:00

<p>Brenda: I would go with the epi-pen due to ease of use. In an emergency situation I don't believe you want to be drawing up meds. & measuring in micrograms. The dosage for epi for anaphylaxis is 0.01 mg/kg. In your childs case this would be just under 0.1mg. The epi-pen Jr. as you know, contains 0.15mg of epi. However, due to ease of use, the delay people have before administering this med. & the fact that the severely allergic may require multiple injections, I go with the epi-pen. In Sampson's study regarding deaths in school age children it was the failure to give epi early & often that was the common mistake in the fatal outcomes. We have also seen people handle the epi-pen for practice & inject the air &/or themselves the first time around...Epi is contraindicated with hypertension & coronary artery disease, but in the case of life threatening anaphylaxis there are no contraindications, considering the alternative is death. Good luck & stay safe</p>

Posted on: Sat, 02/06/1999 - 3:33am
brenda's picture
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Joined: 01/22/1999 - 09:00

<p>Tracy,<br />
Other than the peanut allergy is your son healthy? Because I find it odd that the drs. think the epi-pen jr. is not suitable for your child. My dr. said since my child has a healthy heart then epi was fine. It seems alot of children in the 20 1b. weight range (including my own child) has been prescribed the epi-pen jr. Why don't you call Dey Laboratories, maker of the epi-pen, to get their opinion. 1-800-755-5560.</p>
<p>dhumphries,<br />
"an episode last year which I do presume as<br />
anyphaltic (SIC). My son sneezed profusely, threw up. had hives, and coughed."</p>
<p>As I've been told, a reaction has to involve the respitory and/or cardiovascular system to be considered an anaphylactic reaction. So, hiving, vomiting and coughing wouldn't be anaphylaxis. Someone correct me if you think this is wrong.<br />
b.</p>

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