biphasic reactions

Posted on: Wed, 01/15/2003 - 2:35am
cynde's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

Sometimes a person can get a second reaction which has the same source as the first reaction. I have been told that a classic biphasic reaction happens 6 - 8 hours after the initial reaction, but can happen up to 24 hours later. I read on another thread that someone had been told by their doctor that a biphasic can occur up to 72 hours after the initial reaction. So I have two questions.

What has everyone else heard? After reading the 72 hour one, I did a search here and found that a lot of different people had gotten a lot of different information from their doctors (or ER doctors). Some people said 4, some said 8, some said 12 hours etc... It sounds like their is no definitive answer, I just want to know what everyone else has heard?

My second question is how do you know if it is a biphasic reaction or just a reaction to a new contact? If it is only a few hours and they have not ingested (or contacted) anything new, it would be pretty obvious. But if it has been 24, 48 or 72 hours later and they have been back to school and eating again, is their any way to be sure?

I guess I actually have 3 questions. Who has experienced this? My mother is allergic to yellowjackets and cross reacts (at certain times of the year) to tomatoes. She has had 3 anaphylactic reactions, with no biphasics, my PA son has had 2 anaphylactic reactions with no biphasics (thank goodness). Have we just been really lucky or are the biphasic reactions very rare?

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Cynde

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