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Posted on: Sun, 09/28/2003 - 1:52am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

My feelings exactly Carefulmom.
Epi pen STOPS the reaction in it's tracks and gives you time to call 911 and make it to the hospital.
Epi pen does not cure a reaction, it just halts it for awhile.
I say this so often I am sorry to repeat myself again. I read that most kids die because some adult has decided to "wait and see." Holding off the epi pen because of their own fear or whatever.
A peanut allergy in any form is a deadly allergy. Period. It is not going to get any better, ever. Sometimes the reactions are cumulative meaning the next one is stronger and faster than the previous, and on and on.
Our son had been given permission when he was as young as 10 to override the decision of any adult. Use your epi pen and call 911 no matter what the adults around you say.
Peggy

Posted on: Sun, 09/28/2003 - 2:55am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Plus once you have used it and seen your child completely fine within 60 seconds, it seems pointless to try something else instead next time that may or may not work, and at best will take awhile. It is very striking how quickly the Epi works.

Posted on: Sun, 09/28/2003 - 3:16am
Peg541's picture
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[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 09/28/2003 - 3:43am
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Joined: 08/04/2003 - 09:00

Thank you, thank you, thank you.
Very good advice indeed!
Jen

Posted on: Sun, 09/28/2003 - 4:02am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

Jen,
Thank YOU for being so gracious and letting us go on and on. Especially me.
My PA son is 18 and away at college for the first time. I only found this site last December. I was on my own for 17 years.
I wish I had a place like this way back then. You'll get lots of good stuff here.
Peggy

Posted on: Sun, 09/28/2003 - 10:29pm
StaceyK's picture
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Joined: 05/06/2003 - 09:00

I have to say, that my aboved posted ER plan does NOT meet with the approval of my allergist, who says you should wait the longest possible time to use the Epi Pen - even, he says, on the way to the ER in the car if your child "really" starts to collapse. I think he's crazy - no one else says that - so I go by the Food Allergy support group's sponsoring doctor in my area, who is also the one who gave the food allergy seminar. Needless to say, I'm shopping for a new allergist.

Posted on: Sun, 09/28/2003 - 11:59pm
momofjen's picture
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Joined: 10/07/2002 - 09:00

What if the reaction is in the form of a few hives and to your knowledge, no peanut /nut products were ingested? My dd use to come up with one or two mystery hives around her mouth for no apparent reason. I always gave her benedryl, and watched her closely. Am I wrong to do that.? Allergist said that was the right thing. Should she have epijr. in that case?

Posted on: Mon, 09/29/2003 - 1:02am
attlun's picture
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Joined: 06/13/2003 - 09:00

I would not give epi in that case, unless further symptoms developed. That is just my own opinion based upon our experience.
------------------
Tina
Trevor 8/6/01
Harmony 1/22/03

Posted on: Mon, 09/29/2003 - 4:29am
Kim M's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2001 - 09:00

I agree with what Carefulmom and Peg have said here about NOT waiting until there is obvious breathing difficulty before using the Epipen. I asked the first allergist we had the question, and his response was if there are truly ONLY hives, give Benadryl, but if there is any swelling at all, it means there are at least two organ systems involved, and use the Epipen immediately. I can't believe the allergist who says to wait as long as possible. That is absolutely insane, especially in light of some reports that the Epipen fails anyway in up to 10% of cases. I would imagine that waiting greatly increases the chance of the Epipen not doing the job. If there is known ingestion, I would agree that it's probably a good idea to use the Epipen regardless of what the symptoms are.

Posted on: Mon, 09/29/2003 - 11:40am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

And a few hives seem OK but that might mean there are also a TON of hives on the inside of the airway.
Peg

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