Asthma

Posted on: Sun, 05/25/2003 - 1:40pm
Nutty Mama's picture
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Joined: 11/14/2002 - 09:00

DS is 20 months and coughed a lot as an infant (probably due to allergens in breastmilk?). He does not wheeze or cough now, but I am wondering if he is going to exhibit symptoms later. What are some symptoms to look for and when your children were dx'd with asthma?

Thanks,
Cori

Posted on: Sun, 05/25/2003 - 4:53pm
KarenH's picture
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Joined: 09/21/2002 - 09:00

Yes, I'm wondering basically the same thing. I've been tested for asthma before and it came out negative, but I've heard that if you have environmental allergies it's possible to develop it.
What are the symptoms of asthma?
Over the past two weeks or so I've had a persistant cough every evening, and it gets worse with exposure to pollen or dust (lots of dust here, we're moving and for the past two weeks everything is being moved around. I don't cough during the day, only at night. Would that be related to allergies?

Posted on: Mon, 05/26/2003 - 11:32pm
Jeannine's picture
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Joined: 12/31/2002 - 09:00

DD is 14 months old and been on an asthma plan for quite some time. The signs are coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath when exposed to allergens or too much exercise. Being too small for a "puffer" she has a nebulizer to administer the asthma medicines.
She also has PA and bad ezcema.

Posted on: Tue, 05/27/2003 - 3:39am
NCMom's picture
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Joined: 04/30/2003 - 09:00

My 3 year-old son has asthma as well. We first saw the symptoms when he was 1 year old and I tried milk for the first time with him. My 5 year-old son broke out with eczema when exposed to milk -based formula as a baby so I was not sure what would happen with my second son. He was congested and wheezing and coughed alot. Over the next 12 months, whenever he had a cold, he would wheeze and cough continually. We have a nebulizer for him and he has been on asthma preventatives for awhile now.
My 3 year-old wasn't diagnosed with PA until he was almost 2 1/2 when I gave him a cookie with peanut butter in it. The doctors had told me since he had eczema and asthma we should wait until he was more than 2 (now I know I should have waited much longer!) He got a blister in his mouth and he lost his voice - his throat was closing. We gave him benedryl and called the doctor. They told me to watch him that even though all seemed fine at the time that he could go "downhill" over night and he did. He got so croupy I had to take him to the ER. He was then sent to an allergist and with a blood test, they diagnosed him PA.
He has had several instances of croup and although there is a viral croup, I can almost always trace it back to something he ate. He never had anything that I knew had peanuts in it before that reaction with the cookie but unknowingly, I had given him things earlier that I now know contain traces of peanuts. One episode of croup I'm sure came from a chewy raisin granola bar. Not knowing he was allergic to peanuts, I didn't know not to give that to him.
I didn't mean to type such a long story to answer the asthma question! When they wheeze, cough continually and can't say more than 2 words in a breath, they definitely have asthma. I've heard that most children who wheeze before they're 3 years old will sometimes outgrow the asthma but I've also been told that since my son has the allergies to go along with the asthma, that he won't likely outgrow it. His asthma is definitely episodal and can be linked to either a cold or food exposure. One time it was sunflower seeds (from homemade muselix) and we didn't know about sunflower seeds and that they're usually processed in peanut plants.
Good luck - I hope your child does not have asthma. The asthma in combo with PA makes a peanut reaction very scary since it involves the airway system. I am very thankful for this site and told my son's allergist about it. I wish I had known about it when he was first diagnosed last summer since we could have avoided a few of our "episodes".
Susie

Posted on: Tue, 05/27/2003 - 10:47am
nancy023's picture
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Joined: 12/12/2002 - 09:00

The first symptom I really noticed in my asthmatic son when he was not quite two, was his difficulty breathing during respiratory infections. His skin would retract around his ribs and at his collar bone, and it just did not look right. Even though I could not hear wheezing, I took him to emergency and they treated him and admitted him. His symptoms were very different than the adult symptoms that I have.

Posted on: Tue, 05/27/2003 - 12:32pm
momma2boys's picture
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Susie, I would really be interested in discussing the croup issue with you further. My Pa ds has asthma and many,many episodes of croup.
We went to a new allergist last week and I asked him about if it could be a peanut reaction. He said usually it is hives ,etc.not croup, but I really had no idea what he had eaten before it came on. I will keep track now though. He almost always ends up with pneumonia after each episode as well.
Cori, sorry to intrude on your thread like that, I just have been wondering about that. Both my boys have asthma and allergies and usually its coughing at night that I notice first. Sometimes shortness of breath with alot of exercise.
For the most part they only having real problems, wheezing etc. when they have a cold or virus, etc.

Posted on: Wed, 06/04/2003 - 3:44am
NCMom's picture
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Joined: 04/30/2003 - 09:00

Momma2boys,
Does that mean you have 2 boys? I have 3 and sometimes it seems like more :}
Yes, my son has had several croup incidents that we can trace to peanut exposure - especially the first one. His lip got a blister inside and then he lost his voice. He sounded like he had sucked the air out of a helium balloon. All of this was after he bit into the cookie and immediately started crying to get it out of his mouth. I thought he just didn't like it. He has never had hives. After the initial reaction went away, his breathing problems developed - it was several hours later. They progressed into horrible croup by 4am and we were off to the ER.
He also reacted to a oatmeal raisin granola bar. Now I know he should never have granola but I did not know about this site and it was just after he was diagnosed. I have since told his allergist that he should tell everyone about pa.com and give them info about FAAN. Anyway, it was the same thing. He was a little sniffly after lunch and woke up coughing from naptime. No major thing. That night, I thought he was going to die. The croup was so bad he could barely breathe. I have decadron (a steroid) at home since he has had several problems before and our pediatrician wants me to be prepared and hopefully avoid the ER. They've spoken to me many times in the wee morning hours!
Matthew's reactions scare me since they involve his ability to breathe. I don't even know what hives look like. His allergist told me his IgE levels and that they put him in the 95% likely to have a severe reaction category. I'm sure any reaction is scary.
How has your experience been with croup?

Posted on: Wed, 06/04/2003 - 11:25am
momma2boys's picture
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NCMOM, Hi yes I do have two boys, one is 7, non pa but asthma and LOTS of other allergies. My PA son is 5.
He had his first episode of croup at about 2 and scared me half to death. Then about a year and a half ago it was almost constantly happening and almost every time he would end up with pneumonia. They tested him for cystic fibrosis and did an immune system workup. He tested low against the pneumococcus ? and they gave him a second prevnar shot and the numbers went up.
This past winter he only had pneumonia twice as compared to 6 times the previous winter. I have never kept track of what he ate beforehand because I wasnt well informed about the peanut allergy. I do know he had in the whole time period eaten may contains.
The worst episode, I heard him cough croupy one time as I was getting into bed and that was it so I almost ignored it, but decided I better check on him. I went in and he was sitting in his bed gasping for air. I raced him to the er which is 4 blocks away (thank God!) and the nurse luckily knew me and rushed him in, put him on oxygen and paged respiratory stat(it was like being on er). His pulse ox. was only 88. They gave him steroids by injection, I cant remember what . Hes had decadron but not that time. We then had to wait 4 hours to make sure he didnt rebound. Scared me to death and he slept in our room the rest of the winter.
He also has a very husky, hoarse voice all the time so they thought it may be related to reflux, but ruled it out with testing. OUr new allergist questions that because he did exhibit some signs, so we are looking into that.
We also keep prednisone on hand so I can start it as soon as he sounds croupy and not have to go to er. I had to laugh, after the bad episode we went to the pedi. the next morning for a recheck and he said at his age croup should not be serious enough for me to bother taking him to the er. I responded that his pulse ox. was only 88 and he looked at me and said "OK, then you need to take him".
It also scares me that he seems to be prone to respiritory distress as far as the peanut allergy.

Posted on: Wed, 06/04/2003 - 1:01pm
maggie0303's picture
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Joined: 04/14/2003 - 09:00

My dd started with asthma before she was one. She also has severe eczema. Her asthma started with wheezing, at least thats what we noticed first. Hers seemed to be more seasonal. In fact looking at old prescriptions the dates are almost exact from year to year, Spring, Fall mainly. Any colds that she gets seems to land in her chest and can lead to wheezing or exposure to other allergens like cats, dogs, etc will trigger her asthma. Fortunately, this is much better controlled now with medications.
Both my kids have had croup several times. DD even had a two day admission to the hospital with this. I have been told also that my dd (9) is old for croup, but she still gets it. I never even thought about the possibility of a food reaction. ARGH!

Posted on: Wed, 06/04/2003 - 6:56pm
mom2taylor's picture
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Joined: 05/23/2003 - 09:00

My dd also has asthma. The first signs were severe persistant cough and difficulty breathing and wheezing. She gets really Short Of Breath on bad air days. She is allergic to cats, dogs, ozone, pollen etc.

Posted on: Wed, 05/16/2007 - 6:40am
Greenlady's picture
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Joined: 06/30/2004 - 09:00

You don't need to be "worried" about asthma, but it wouldn't hurt to keep in the back of your mind as your child develops. I think asthma isn't usually diagnosed until 3 or 4. Here's some more information:
[url="http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/asthma/AS00003"]http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/asthma/AS00003[/url]
I did a quick search, but couldn't find the exact statistics, but I know here is some overlap between food allergies and asthma (and ezcema), but not everyone with FA has asthma.
However, I do know that having asthma and food allergies together increases the likelihood of a severe reaction, and I think kids with FA and asthma are less likely to outgrow the FA.
Because of that, I think my son's asthma diagnosis hit me harder than his PA.
But we've adjusted, and it hasn't limited us in any significant way. Just one more thing to deal with. :-)

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