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Posted on: Sat, 05/10/2003 - 10:49pm
McMelon's picture
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Joined: 09/21/2002 - 09:00

Thank you everyone, again for your words of encouragement and hope. Thank you for providing the links to further information. This thread has been to helpful to me. I believe it has really helped other people as well. I am sending positive thoughts and prayers out to all of you. Have a Wonderful Mother's Day! Melody

Posted on: Mon, 05/12/2003 - 12:32pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Thanks for your encouragment. Most of the time we forget that there is even a problem with my baby. All I see is an adorable baby with a beautiful big smile. It only "hits" hard when we socialize with friends that have infants his age. To see them thriving and developing feels like a knife stabbing me in the heart.
We have yet to get the last three results of the lab work. It is agonizing to be patient.
About my husband, he is accepting of the physical therapist for the gross motor development, the occupational therapist for the fine motor development, but is skeptical of SID.
I have been performing the "brushing" and (unsure of the terms) applying pressure on various parts of his body. I'm trying to be vigilant about it, but it is difficult. I can definately tell where he is sensative! The only thing that has literally changed since we began is his sleeping patterns. On Saturday he only slept 40 minutes from 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sunday it increased and he slept for 1 hour. Today, it was approximately 1 1/2 hours. Does this sound as if he is being bothered by the procedures?
Thanks again for all of your support. I really need it right now.

Posted on: Tue, 05/13/2003 - 9:53am
McMelon's picture
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Joined: 09/21/2002 - 09:00

hello Naomi,
I don't have any answers but wanted to bump this back up for you. I hope some of the other people will see it and be able to help. hang in there. I'll keep you in my prayers, Melody

Posted on: Wed, 05/14/2003 - 1:21am
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Joined: 04/18/2001 - 09:00

I just read this and thought I'd add it to this post:
Report: California's autism rate doubles in four years
The Associated Press
5/14/03 9:36 AM
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- The number of autistic children in California has nearly doubled in the last four years, a new state report shows.
The report found that 20,377 children ages 3 and older were receiving state services for "classic" autism, a developmental disorder characterized by difficulties communicating and repetitive actions, as of December 2002. That was a 97 percent increase over the 1998 number.
An earlier study had found the state's autism rate increased 237 percent from 1987 to 1998.
Ron Huff, a psychologist who conducted both studies for the California Department of Developmental Services, said the latest numbers reflect an actual increase, not just changes in the diagnosis.
Despite greater awareness and more research in recent years, the report said scientists still do not know what causes the developmental disorder.
State researchers are investigating potential genetic and environmental toxins for links to autism. They are also exploring the debated theory that childhood vaccines may be at the root of the problem.

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 12:18am
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Joined: 10/05/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by cathlina:
[b]I am hoping some of my experiences might help all of you...
My sister was an absolute normal baby until she was 18 months old. Then in 1956, she developed encephalitis, ran a high fever and went into a coma for a while.
When she came out of the coma, the doctors said she would be a vegetable the rest of her life.
My Dad refused to give up and worked and worked with her, taught her to crawl again, sit again, stand again and walk again. She became quite hyperactive and had lots of seizures. She never learned to talk and had bad temper tantrums.
Later, my parents placed her in a state hospital for the mentally retarded. There were no community based programs like we have today. Kids were segregrated from others rather than mainstreamed like they are today.
Of course, I was devastated and missed her terribly.
At age 19, she passed away from pneumonia.
For years, I was angry about her illness.
Finally, several years ago, I needed a job and found one working as a special education associate in a high school.
I worked with students who had ADDHD, Asperbger's, autism, Downs Syndrome, and mental retardation.
I found myself accepting the kids, loving them. They were an absolute joy. I could be myself with them. They accepted me and I accepted them. I had an absolute riot working with them on Special Olympics.
One student, who had autism, started in elementary school with behaviors that included hiding under desks, refusing to socialize and acting almost animal like.
By 9th grade, he was very social and I worked with him in pre-algebra.
Another student had Asberger's and would not have eye contact with anyone. I worked with her for two years to help her trust me. As time went along, she greeted me in the hallway but always avoided eye contact. The last day of her senior year, she approached me and told me it was her last day and that she was going to college. She made eye contact and smiled. We hugged each other. The relationship with her...that smile and eye contact...I consider to be one of the biggest achievements of my life.
Two weeks ago, I returned to that high school special education class. Each student hugged me and told me how much they missed me.
I guess I have learned what really is important in life and the anger about my sister resolved itself through their love.
Remember, there is lots of and lots of help out...there are programs, specialists and people who will delight in every little step your child takes.
Things have come a long way since 1956.
[This message has been edited by cathlina (edited May 11, 2003).][/b]
I found myself accepting the kids, loving them. They were an absolute joy. I could be myself with them. They accepted me and I accepted them.[b] I have seen this in dd.[/b]
One student, who had autism, started in elementary school with behaviors that included hiding under desks, refusing to socialize and acting almost animal like.[b]DD has been doing this alot,rabbit,cat,lion,you name it she has even done this on the way in to school,DD is in 1st grade. [/b]
She made eye contact and smiled. We hugged each other. The relationship with her...that smile and eye contact...I consider to be one of the biggest achievements of my life.[b] Last week I saw this in dd. It was the most wonderfull feeling I have ever felt. Now she makes EYE contact with me ALL the time, It must be the *trust thingy*. What I saw in those littles eyes was beautiful love,I too
consider this to be one of the biggest achievements of my life. She has come a long way,we still have a lot of work to do with her,She is ready and the family is too!!.[/b]
I guess I have learned what really is important in life and the anger about my sister resolved itself through their love.
[b] Here too,Let go of the anger,right now all we can do is help her with her symptoms,until such time she can use her *own* voice [/b]
cathlina,Thank You for sharing this,It has helped me alot.(((Hugs)))
------------------
Love this site
Synthia
[This message has been edited by synthia (edited February 08, 2006).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 8:30am
PurpleCat's picture
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Joined: 01/28/2006 - 09:00

I too have a young child with Asperger's Syndrome. Have you visited the Oasis discussion board??? I lurked there too for awhile and then became a member the same time I joined this group. Great place for support and ideas. They are wonderful children [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]!
------------------
Keep Smiling
DD - allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, coconut, and egg

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 10:29am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Purple Cat -
I have a son with NLD/borderline Aspergers. I started a thread in Off Topic about NLD. Thanks for the site you mentioned. I'll check it out.
Take care,
Lam [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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