apple

Posted on: Tue, 07/11/2006 - 12:52pm
momtotwokidz's picture
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Joined: 10/02/2005 - 09:00

My dd is almost 1 and has eaten apples a couple of times, we were outside today and she had some apple, and in a few minutes her cheeks were red and so was her chin, a reaction? She also had some natural cheetos, and has eaten those a few times without a problem.
Therese

Posted on: Wed, 07/12/2006 - 2:06am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

I'm trying to remember the symptoms of oral allergy syndrome. I think redness on the face can be part of it, but I'd do a search on the boards to see what you can find. Basically, if a person has a pollen allergy, they can react mildly to particular fruits during that pollen season even if they aren't actually allergic to those fruits. I know apples are one of the fruits this can happen with.
Was the apple from a store that sells peanuts in bins nearby? Was it washed and peeled? Or was it cooked apple?

Posted on: Wed, 07/12/2006 - 3:26am
multiallergymom's picture
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Joined: 06/11/2005 - 09:00

Can't remember exactly, but do the natural cheetos use peanut oil? Check the label.

Posted on: Wed, 07/12/2006 - 3:29am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I don't have a package here with me, but I know Natural Cheetos does not contain peanut oil. My kids eat them all the time.

Posted on: Wed, 07/12/2006 - 5:43am
happycat's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2004 - 09:00

Hi Therese -
My son has oral allergy syndrome and reacts to lots of raw fruits and vegetables. His symptoms are a very, very itchy mouth and sometimes red blotches around his mouth.
His first OAS reaction was to an apple, and I noticed red blotches several times after eating, before he finally complained of an itchy mouth.
He can still eat apples if they are cooked/processed (so juice, apple sauce etc. doesn't bug him).
I do know that one can be allergic to the actual fruit (as opposed to having OAS), and I'm still not sure how the distinction is made between the two, in terms of managing the allergy.

Posted on: Wed, 07/12/2006 - 1:47pm
falcon's picture
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Joined: 07/03/2004 - 09:00

My son is allergic to apples, many other fruits and veggies. With apples, he started to just get blothcy red around mouth - had been eating apples for years without a problem. He would get blotchy around the mouth sometimes and not others. Then one day he got blotchy and a minute later his face turned purple and had raised white bumps all over, then his eyes started tearing profusely. Symptoms subsided with benadryl. Had him tested and he was positive for apple. Whether it is oral allergy or regular seems irrelevant to me. When I read up on it, I learned that oral allergy responses can also become anaphylactic. We avoid any fruits or veggies that result in this red blotchiness.

Posted on: Wed, 07/12/2006 - 2:18pm
momtotwokidz's picture
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Joined: 10/02/2005 - 09:00

She is not the one with a PA, my son is, and no, nuts are not nearby the apple bin. I am going to give her apples again, in a few days, and see if it happens again. Then if nothing will try cheetos.
My dh is allergic to kiwi and my son PA, so, one more, ho hum.
My son has really sensitive skin and was really worried that he had a tomoatoe allergy as his face would really turn red, almost purple when he would eat them (fresh, and ripe off the vine), but he tested negative to a skin, blood test, and to a contact in the dr office, we never went back for a food challenge as I figured if he was allergic, it would be all tomatos. Anyway, I will let yoyu know what happens/
Therese

Posted on: Thu, 07/13/2006 - 4:30am
happycat's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2004 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by falcon:
[b]My son is allergic to apples, many other fruits and veggies. With apples, he started to just get blothcy red around mouth - had been eating apples for years without a problem. He would get blotchy around the mouth sometimes and not others. Then one day he got blotchy and a minute later his face turned purple and had raised white bumps all over, then his eyes started tearing profusely. Symptoms subsided with benadryl. Had him tested and he was positive for apple. Whether it is oral allergy or regular seems irrelevant to me. When I read up on it, I learned that oral allergy responses can also become anaphylactic. We avoid any fruits or veggies that result in this red blotchiness.[/b]
Just wondering, do you completely avoid the fruits/veggies your son is allergic to (like you would do with PN)? Or can he eat them cooked like my DS?
When my son was tested for apple his SPT was negative, but the pollen allergies he was tested for came back hugely positive (even though he doesn't seem to have much problems with seasonal allergies at this point).
Since that point he has complained about many raw fruits and veggies, which don't seem to bother him if they have been cooked. We haven't had him tested for these, just assumed they were OAS since they are on the list his doctor gave us for cross reacting with pollens.

Posted on: Thu, 07/13/2006 - 9:55pm
Gilli011's picture
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Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Hi,
Glad I found this thread...this has nothing to do with my two PA daughters, but is about myself. Three years ago I began reacting to pollen, it lasts for about a month or so, itching eyes, sneezing, awfully irritating. A couple of weeks ago I ate some cheeries and noticed my throat started to itch and swell a small bit. Then yesterday I ate a small piece of peach, my eyes started to itch, swell and the whites turned jelly-like. This lasted for a few hours, couldn't even get my contacts out....so am I understanding this right, pollen allergies and fruit allergies are linked?
Thanks for your info.
Gilli

Posted on: Sat, 07/15/2006 - 2:09am
LauraP's picture
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Joined: 03/10/1999 - 09:00

My 12-year-old son has a bona fide apple allergy - unlike oral allergy syndrome, you get the same symptoms on exposure as you do with PA and other true food allergies.
This allergy came on about 2 years ago - he'd been eating apples his whole life with absolutely no problem. I strongly suspect this allergy was caused by his seasonal allergy immunotherapy (which he had an allergic reaction to as well). His main seasonal problem was birch - a known apple cross react. Of course, we stopped the seasonal immunotherapy.
We avoid apples and apple cross contamination, just as we avoid peanuts & possible cross there.

Posted on: Sat, 07/15/2006 - 8:40am
LisaM's picture
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Joined: 11/04/2005 - 09:00

If you are allergic to birch pollen and are sensitized to apples because of birch pollen (or immunotherapy to birch pollen), then I believe that the reaction is called Oral Allergy Syndrome regardless of severity. Oral Allergy Syndrome can be anaphylactic. Usually, though, people can eat cooked apples.
[This message has been edited by LisaM (edited July 15, 2006).]

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