antihistimine question???

Posted on: Wed, 08/02/2006 - 3:11pm
brown1442's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/20/2006 - 09:00

If your child is on Zyrtec or Claritin daily already can you still give Benedryl for exposures??

This came up today because my 3.5 year old son was stung by a wasp today. I was going to give him Benedryl because I've had two very large (as in over 6 inches in diameter) localized reactions to bee stings in my life...the only 2 times I've been stung... and I worried about his possible reaction. I stopped myself because he's already on Claritin daily and I was worried about doubling up on the antihistimines. Instead I iced it and gave him Motrin and then watched him for a good 4 hours before letting him take a nap.

Well this made me start thinking... my 14 month old has a PA (diagnosed last month when he broke out in hives and started drooling profusely after getting a hold of a knife in the dishwasher with peanut butter on it) and I was told to give him benedryl with any even suspected exposure. We have epipens in case he starts having a bad reaction too. BUT he's on Zyrtec daily now for bad seasonal allergies and eczema so can I still give him that benedryl??

I know that was long winded!! Sorry about that!!! I was going to call my ped but I knew full well if I called them they'd make me bring the 3.5 year old in... they ALWAYS want to see them before answering questions. We go in for my youngest 15 month appt in a few weeks and I can ask then but I wnated to know for the meantime. TIA!!

Posted on: Wed, 08/02/2006 - 3:14pm
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

I don't know about Claritin, but we were told it is ok to double up Zyrtec and Benadryl (DD is on daily Zyrtec). Definitely check with the doctor, though as this info may depend on the dosage of each drug.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Wed, 08/02/2006 - 3:33pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Agreed-- check with your allergist. But we've done this for many many years now.
Zyrtec twice a day... Benadryl as needed.
The dosing window on both drugs is [i]very[/i] wide, safety wise.

Posted on: Wed, 08/02/2006 - 9:20pm
luvmyboys's picture
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Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

We were just told by our allergist that the 'only' risk of increasing the antihistamine dose is fatigue. I'm sure this of course has its limits. But ds is on 1-2 tsp claritin daily and his action plan says 2 tsp benadryl as well in case of rxn. He's almost 6 yrs old.
In fact that makes me wonder...the 2tsp Benadryl has been the plan for 3 years now...wonder if that's too low? hmmmm
Luvmyboys

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 1:57am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

My son has been taking a daily antihistamine for environmental allergies since he was 2-1/2. I remember when he had the anaphylactic reaction where he almost died when he was 3-1/4, I told the emerg doctor that he had already had his daily antihistamine for the day (Kid's Claritin or Reactine, I can't remember which one now). He explained to me later, that the Benadryl was completely separate from the daily antihistamine when it came to dealing with a reaction.
Now, when my guy has had a say hive only reaction, I do use his regular daily antihistamine and I actually don't have any Benadryl in the house usually.
When he had his last anaphylactic reaction, we left hospital with instructions for Benadryl (I forget how often and for how long) and still his daily antihistamine.
HTH. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:06am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My son takes Zyrtec once a day, and Benadryl as needed. Check w/your dr.
Corvallis Mom - Just curious why twice a day? (Zyrtec)

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:22am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Because we don't want the drug to do any "tailing" in serum concentration. It becomes less of a problem when they are five to seven years old, but until then, they metabolize antihistamines pretty rapidly.
We tried the chewables and never could figure out whether to give it in the morning or the evening-- as she became symptomatic at some point each day that way...
So- in the morning to prevent all the mystery hives and sniffles throughout the day...
and in the evening to get through the night. Asthma, dustmites, etc... lung function actually has a circadian minimum which for most people is between 2 and 5 AM-- not a good time to have the lowest amount of systemic antihistamine...
Also, there is research that suggests that aggressive dosing with a long-acting modern antihistamine can prevent asthma or at least stop its progression. Seems to have been true in DD's case.
PS-- 2 tsp of Benadryl for a 3 yo seems VERY high. We have dosed DD this high once by accident during a rxn, but it made her very loopy and was clearly a mild overdose... better than the alternative at the time, but still...[i]check with your physician regarding dosage for your child's weight....PLEASE.[/i] 2 tsp is probably okay for a 6yo-- this is about what we give DD now.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:25am
joeybeth's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

someone mentioned that they were unsure of their child's dosage needs for benadryl. i was surprised when our ped. allergist just up'd my two girls' dosages. we usually went with 2 tsp. each in the past. (i got that off the package instructions for their ages and weights). now, i am told that my 7 yr old need 3 tsp. of benadryl AFTER the epipen (our allergist believes epi should go first in an emergency or possible emergency...no waiting) and my 10 year old requires 4 tsp. of benadryl after the epi.
not sure if it's correct or not, but if we are not dealing anaphylaxis or the possibility of anaphylaxis (like say, we have an itchy bugbite or a rash caused by grasses or something non-pa related), i still give them the dosage on the box instructions. i just felt like 4 tsp. seemed like an awful lot. i will definitely follow the allergist's advice on dosage if we find ourselves dealing with possibly ananphylaxis though.
csc: why don't you have any benadryl in the house? isn't it one of your meds you keep with the epinephrin?? just wondering if you use something different.
joey

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:42am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Corvallis Mom -
Thanks for explaining. My son is about 75lbs. and is almost 10 years old. He takes 1 tsp./day at bedtime, mainly for nighttime cough and home environmentals (dust, dustmites, etc...).
We have an allergist appt. next week. I'm sure the dosage will be addressed. The appt. is to renew his script of Zyrtec.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 4:18am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

yes, that seems pretty low... DD takes twice that daily and she weighs a lot... make that [i]a whole lot[/i] LOL.... less than 75 lbs.
Her allergist is pretty aggressive with the pharmacology, though. He thinks we need to move to a regular epipen this fall and she doesn't weigh 50 lbs yet. I'm okay with that given rxn hx.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 9:57am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

joeybeth, just based on my guy's reactions, since his daily antihistamine will deal with a hive only reaction, I don't feel the need to have Benadryl.
Then, with an anaphylactic reaction, I'm of the EpiPen only school of thought.
(Or, maybe I'm just an incredible BAD MOM! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ).
Hope that made sense. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 10:27am
cgroth's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/25/2006 - 09:00

My dd (around 22 lbs) is on Zyrtec 1/2 tsp once daily, although I after reading corvallis mom's post, I may change her to bid dosing. She also uses Benadryl for any reactions, I usually give her about 2mL's - 1/2 tsp. for that.
Benadryl works immediately, while antihistamines like Zyrtec or Claritin are released throughout the day.

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 11:47am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Just updating...
We had our check-up, Zyrtec refill appointment. Two things:
1. He's still on 1 tsp./day.
2. I asked about the Zyrtec preventing contact reactions, and she said, "Yes, it very well could."
Strange how differently doctors can think about the very same subject...

Posted on: Fri, 08/18/2006 - 6:50am
Rach's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/01/2001 - 09:00

I have often doubled up,the once daily one I take is non drowsy, whereas the tablet I take for a reaction is not. My chemist says that they are very safe together ol long as they are not both drowsy ones - you can safely have one of each.
On a similar topic, for hay fever, I tried a new approach this year which was to give up cow's milk in March, pre hay fever season and to replace it entirely with goat's milk. I have to say I was rather pesimistic about what results this would have, but I am amazed, and very pleased. I used to take 2 one a day antihistimines for my hay fever every day, and still my hay fever was awful - many days my eyes were too bad to even drive. Sometimes I would still have to top up with a stronger drowsy antihistimine. However, since trying the goat's milk, I only took antihistimine for my hay fever about 10 times over the last few months, on really high pollen days, and it treated the symptoms very well. I am definitely doing this every year from now on, I was so pleased to enjoy the summer without the hassle of hay fever, especially as I live as far into the countryside as it is possible to get!!!
I don't eat cheese anyway, but it's the same theory - replace cow's cheese with goat's cheese, all dairy should be goat's. I don't know whether this is proven, but I had read a case study and this was meant to improve eczema and hay fever, and in my situation it definiely worked. For eczema, I still find a sockful of porridge oats in the bath is the best treatment, however!
Just something to maybe try if you can have goat's produce.
Take care
Rach

Posted on: Wed, 08/02/2006 - 3:14pm
Momcat's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

I don't know about Claritin, but we were told it is ok to double up Zyrtec and Benadryl (DD is on daily Zyrtec). Definitely check with the doctor, though as this info may depend on the dosage of each drug.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Wed, 08/02/2006 - 3:33pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Agreed-- check with your allergist. But we've done this for many many years now.
Zyrtec twice a day... Benadryl as needed.
The dosing window on both drugs is [i]very[/i] wide, safety wise.

Posted on: Wed, 08/02/2006 - 9:20pm
luvmyboys's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

We were just told by our allergist that the 'only' risk of increasing the antihistamine dose is fatigue. I'm sure this of course has its limits. But ds is on 1-2 tsp claritin daily and his action plan says 2 tsp benadryl as well in case of rxn. He's almost 6 yrs old.
In fact that makes me wonder...the 2tsp Benadryl has been the plan for 3 years now...wonder if that's too low? hmmmm
Luvmyboys

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 1:57am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

My son has been taking a daily antihistamine for environmental allergies since he was 2-1/2. I remember when he had the anaphylactic reaction where he almost died when he was 3-1/4, I told the emerg doctor that he had already had his daily antihistamine for the day (Kid's Claritin or Reactine, I can't remember which one now). He explained to me later, that the Benadryl was completely separate from the daily antihistamine when it came to dealing with a reaction.
Now, when my guy has had a say hive only reaction, I do use his regular daily antihistamine and I actually don't have any Benadryl in the house usually.
When he had his last anaphylactic reaction, we left hospital with instructions for Benadryl (I forget how often and for how long) and still his daily antihistamine.
HTH. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:06am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My son takes Zyrtec once a day, and Benadryl as needed. Check w/your dr.
Corvallis Mom - Just curious why twice a day? (Zyrtec)

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:22am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Because we don't want the drug to do any "tailing" in serum concentration. It becomes less of a problem when they are five to seven years old, but until then, they metabolize antihistamines pretty rapidly.
We tried the chewables and never could figure out whether to give it in the morning or the evening-- as she became symptomatic at some point each day that way...
So- in the morning to prevent all the mystery hives and sniffles throughout the day...
and in the evening to get through the night. Asthma, dustmites, etc... lung function actually has a circadian minimum which for most people is between 2 and 5 AM-- not a good time to have the lowest amount of systemic antihistamine...
Also, there is research that suggests that aggressive dosing with a long-acting modern antihistamine can prevent asthma or at least stop its progression. Seems to have been true in DD's case.
PS-- 2 tsp of Benadryl for a 3 yo seems VERY high. We have dosed DD this high once by accident during a rxn, but it made her very loopy and was clearly a mild overdose... better than the alternative at the time, but still...[i]check with your physician regarding dosage for your child's weight....PLEASE.[/i] 2 tsp is probably okay for a 6yo-- this is about what we give DD now.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:25am
joeybeth's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/01/2006 - 09:00

someone mentioned that they were unsure of their child's dosage needs for benadryl. i was surprised when our ped. allergist just up'd my two girls' dosages. we usually went with 2 tsp. each in the past. (i got that off the package instructions for their ages and weights). now, i am told that my 7 yr old need 3 tsp. of benadryl AFTER the epipen (our allergist believes epi should go first in an emergency or possible emergency...no waiting) and my 10 year old requires 4 tsp. of benadryl after the epi.
not sure if it's correct or not, but if we are not dealing anaphylaxis or the possibility of anaphylaxis (like say, we have an itchy bugbite or a rash caused by grasses or something non-pa related), i still give them the dosage on the box instructions. i just felt like 4 tsp. seemed like an awful lot. i will definitely follow the allergist's advice on dosage if we find ourselves dealing with possibly ananphylaxis though.
csc: why don't you have any benadryl in the house? isn't it one of your meds you keep with the epinephrin?? just wondering if you use something different.
joey

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 2:42am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Corvallis Mom -
Thanks for explaining. My son is about 75lbs. and is almost 10 years old. He takes 1 tsp./day at bedtime, mainly for nighttime cough and home environmentals (dust, dustmites, etc...).
We have an allergist appt. next week. I'm sure the dosage will be addressed. The appt. is to renew his script of Zyrtec.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 4:18am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

yes, that seems pretty low... DD takes twice that daily and she weighs a lot... make that [i]a whole lot[/i] LOL.... less than 75 lbs.
Her allergist is pretty aggressive with the pharmacology, though. He thinks we need to move to a regular epipen this fall and she doesn't weigh 50 lbs yet. I'm okay with that given rxn hx.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 9:57am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

joeybeth, just based on my guy's reactions, since his daily antihistamine will deal with a hive only reaction, I don't feel the need to have Benadryl.
Then, with an anaphylactic reaction, I'm of the EpiPen only school of thought.
(Or, maybe I'm just an incredible BAD MOM! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ).
Hope that made sense. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I would walk up to heaven and bring you back home with me.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2006 - 10:27am
cgroth's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/25/2006 - 09:00

My dd (around 22 lbs) is on Zyrtec 1/2 tsp once daily, although I after reading corvallis mom's post, I may change her to bid dosing. She also uses Benadryl for any reactions, I usually give her about 2mL's - 1/2 tsp. for that.
Benadryl works immediately, while antihistamines like Zyrtec or Claritin are released throughout the day.

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 11:47am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Just updating...
We had our check-up, Zyrtec refill appointment. Two things:
1. He's still on 1 tsp./day.
2. I asked about the Zyrtec preventing contact reactions, and she said, "Yes, it very well could."
Strange how differently doctors can think about the very same subject...

Posted on: Fri, 08/18/2006 - 6:50am
Rach's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/01/2001 - 09:00

I have often doubled up,the once daily one I take is non drowsy, whereas the tablet I take for a reaction is not. My chemist says that they are very safe together ol long as they are not both drowsy ones - you can safely have one of each.
On a similar topic, for hay fever, I tried a new approach this year which was to give up cow's milk in March, pre hay fever season and to replace it entirely with goat's milk. I have to say I was rather pesimistic about what results this would have, but I am amazed, and very pleased. I used to take 2 one a day antihistimines for my hay fever every day, and still my hay fever was awful - many days my eyes were too bad to even drive. Sometimes I would still have to top up with a stronger drowsy antihistimine. However, since trying the goat's milk, I only took antihistimine for my hay fever about 10 times over the last few months, on really high pollen days, and it treated the symptoms very well. I am definitely doing this every year from now on, I was so pleased to enjoy the summer without the hassle of hay fever, especially as I live as far into the countryside as it is possible to get!!!
I don't eat cheese anyway, but it's the same theory - replace cow's cheese with goat's cheese, all dairy should be goat's. I don't know whether this is proven, but I had read a case study and this was meant to improve eczema and hay fever, and in my situation it definiely worked. For eczema, I still find a sockful of porridge oats in the bath is the best treatment, however!
Just something to maybe try if you can have goat's produce.
Take care
Rach

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