Another nurse story

Posted on: Sun, 11/16/2003 - 3:04am
Thesearentthedroids's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/13/2003 - 09:00

I'm a new member and this incident at my son's school promted me to join. My son came in from the playground at school very nauseous and instead of giving him benedryl as per emergency plan, they called me. I told them to give benedryl and they said - no, its not peanuts, its just a tummy ache. Luckily my mom was able to get to the school and give him benadryl. I am angry and the district nurse is being so condescending. I am so angry that they did not follow the plan and are denying that I asked for benedryl to be given! I took him to his Dr., who told me that they need to learn the emergency plan so I am having a meeting with the principal, nurse and office staff. The nurse keeps saying that benedryl will not stop anaphylaxis but that doesn't address the issue of not attending to the allergic reaction. My son's Dr. agreed that benedryl can stop symptoms before they progress to anaphylasis. Does anyone know a study that shows this so I can bring it to the meeting? Thanks in advance, Beth BTW, I am in nursing school myself.

Posted on: Sun, 11/16/2003 - 6:11am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Does this school have an [i]appropriately trained, full time school nurse[/i] [b]on the premises[/b]? A position specifically dedicated to the school?
Who was responsible for [i]evaluating and treating[/i] your child in the situation you described? Do you feel this/these person(s) is/are qualified to do such? Is there a standard used to examine and determine such? Has anyone voiced concern that they do not feel confident in their [i]evaluation skills?[/i] How would one deem them adequate regardless of whether they voice a concern or not.
I ask these questions since it maybe both sides may be dissatisfied with the outcome of the event you described. I could be wrong.

Posted on: Sun, 11/16/2003 - 7:13am
California Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

I think the nurse was wrong not to follow your written and verbal instructions for treating your son. [i]However[/i], I think she is correct that Benedryl will not prevent an anaphylactic reaction. There have been discussions of this on the board and that has pretty much been the conclusion.
Do you think that it actually was a reaction to peanuts? Does your son normally have nausea as his first reaction? Does he think it was an allergic reaction?
Good luck. It is so very frusturating when you feel you cannot trust the school staff. I'm glad you found us here.
Take care, Miriam

Posted on: Sun, 11/16/2003 - 9:09am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by California Mom:
[b]I think the nurse was wrong not to follow your written and verbal instructions for treating your son. [/b]
[i]was there even a nurse present in the initial situation described?[/i] ie: physically there? was there a conversation per phone during the initial situation?
CM,
had to take a second look at your comment regarding following instructions. As I have related before.......... One may be surprised as to what a licensed professional is [i]required[/i] (compelled?) to do/not do. "Orders" or no orders. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
I personally feel that while this [i]may[/i] provide protection for the professional, ultimately, I personally feel the intention of such is to protect those the professional serves.
Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form.

Posted on: Sun, 11/16/2003 - 10:42am
cathlina's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/29/2001 - 09:00

Last year, I had a reaction to Zithromax. My throat and tongue started to swell. I downed 50 mg of benadryl and drove three miles to my doc's office. He gave me a 25 mg. shot of Benadryl at his office and sent me to the emergency room. After I had been there for 15 minutes, I felt my throat open up. I was given a steroid there and a script for steroids to take at home.
There have been other times, I have used Benadryl and it has worked.
So, basically...I think it is hard to make a blanket statement that Benadryl doesn't work.
But at the same time, just because it works for me doesn't mean it will work for someone else.
I didn't want to take an epi at the time due to a heart med I was on. It was a contradiction to take an epi. I have been taken off of it now so I can take an epi.

Posted on: Sun, 11/16/2003 - 10:32pm
Thesearentthedroids's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/13/2003 - 09:00

There wasn't a nurse present, our school doesn't have a full-time nurse. I don't know for sure if this was peanuts, but 1/2 an hour after the benedryl, he wanted pizza. Nausea and vomiting has almost always been present with his reactions. I don't feel confident with the office staff's ability to treat my son, and I wrote a letter asking for retraining. I guess the issue is that they didn't treat the symptoms as the emergency plan laid them out. I downloaded the Spokane School district's food allergy plan, since we are in the same state, and it made reference to the fact that any nausea must be treated. We are having a meeting today, but I am afraid it's going to be another shuffling around the issue, blame it on anyone not associated with the school sort of thing. Regardless of what benadryl can do, the plan wasn't followed. I don't want to waste time on that, I just want these people to follow directions. Thanks for listening, I hope all goes well today.

Posted on: Mon, 11/17/2003 - 12:31am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Thesearentthedroids:
[b]There wasn't a nurse present, our school doesn't have a full-time nurse. I don't know for sure if this was peanuts, but 1/2 an hour after the benedryl, he wanted pizza. Nausea and vomiting has almost always been present with his reactions. I don't feel confident with the office staff's ability to treat my son, and I wrote a letter asking for retraining. I guess the issue is that they didn't treat the symptoms as the emergency plan laid them out. I downloaded the Spokane School district's food allergy plan, since we are in the same state, and it made reference to the fact that any nausea must be treated. We are having a meeting today, but I am afraid it's going to be another shuffling around the issue, blame it on anyone not associated with the school sort of thing. Regardless of what benadryl can do, the plan wasn't followed. I don't want to waste time on that, I just want these people to follow directions. Thanks for listening, I hope all goes well today. [/b]
Sounds familiar. Too familiar. Too close to home. edit to add: not on all details, but on enough.
Have you requested to tape the meeting? Is this a 504 meeting?
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited November 17, 2003).]

Posted on: Mon, 11/17/2003 - 12:33am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

also asking: Are you bringing an Advocate of sorts?

Posted on: Sun, 11/23/2003 - 3:56pm
wendyh's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/23/2003 - 09:00

First I'd like to say that I'm glad your son is okay. I can't believe the nurse would not follow your verbal order over the phone. Benadryl may not prevent an anaphylactic reaction but it will help the allergic reaction. An Epipen can be used along with benadryl for the immediate symptoms of anaphylaxis and the Benadryl will take a little longer to make a difference.

Posted on: Sun, 11/23/2003 - 11:33pm
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by wendyh:
[b]I can't believe the nurse would not follow your verbal order over the phone. [/b]
You may be surprised at some of the POLICIES institutions like hospitals may have regarding "verbal orders", particularly involving those taken or not by nurses, over the phone. Just mentioning. As it may behoove one to understand such may be out there.
Of course, in the absence of such orders, hospitals, yea emergency systems, may most likely have policies, procedures, protocol, and Standard of Care/Operating Proceedures to deal with untoward events, and similiar crisis, in absence of someone who can give "orders". Certain individuals within such systems may possibly be bound by such PPP and Standard of Care/Operating Proceedures to act accordingly.
Of course, I understand you are speaking of a school system and not a hospital. Just wondering if there is anything to be gleaned.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 11/24/2003 - 1:41am
Peg541's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

thesearentthedroids,
(BTW I love that name)
Another of my mantras is:
[b]Most kids die because some adult has decided to "wait and see" and held off treatment until it was too late.[/b]
And the nurse is not qualified to make a judgement like Benadryl does not stop anaphylaxis. Things go bad in children very quickly.
That's why cathlina could be managed on Benadryl but watch out for the next time cathlina, it will be faster and much worse.
You will never again take Zithromax but kids will be accidentally exposed to peanut again and again and again raising their chances for a bigger and faster anaphylaxis.
They need some serious education at your child's school. You might have to be the person to do it.
Peggy

Pages

Forum

Click on one of the categories below to see all forum topics.

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

It Is Easy To Buy Peanut Free Chocolate Online

Ask any parent of a child with a potentially life-...

Seeds, such as pumpkin or sunflower, make great peanut or tree nut substitutes in recipes, and roasted soy or garbanzo beans are tasty snacks and...

So many wonderful recipes call for peanut butter. These recipes can still be enjoyed by experimenting with peanut butter replacements.

...

Peanuts and peanut oil are cheap and easy additives to food and other commercial goods. It is surprising (and alarming if you have a...

Those with severe peanut allergies soon learn to look for the 'peanut-free sign' on any packaged food purchase. This is a notation found on a wide...