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Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 2:15am
ddvt's picture
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Joined: 06/08/2014 - 08:41

Hi,
My older daughter was diagnosed at 15 mos., and today she is 16. Having tested at the severe end of the scale for so long, we have always been so careful. My house is peanut-free - it is not always easy to read all the ingredient labels, but we have lived well without peanuts. My younger daughter loves peanut butter, but can eat only Sunbutter at home. If she does eat anything with peanuts, she has to wash her hands before getting in the car or coming in the door, and keep her toothbrush away from my PA daughter. Holidays, parties and Halloween were the worst for my daughter when she was younger, emotionally, but I tried to provide peanut-free snacks and treats when she went to parties and at school.
The most important thing, I believe, is to be prepared - always keep the medications up-to-date and carry them with you - often a challenge when the kids get older, into adolescence, because they feel invincible and like "you only live once".
We have been able to successfully dine out and travel, but always with a plan and the right tools. Still, I am always the one who is worried that there will be peanut residues on cutlery and cookware, at peoples' homes or in restaurants, so we avoid places that have peanuts and peanut sauces, esp. Thai and some Chinese restaurants.
Wish you the best as you learn about how to live with this allergy.

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 2:16am
Ralphi's picture
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Joined: 03/16/2010 - 21:59

My granddaughter (now 11) has a life-threatening peanut allergy. We have never had to use the Epi-pens but her allergy scores keep getting higher. She doesn't live with us but we have chosen to never ever have peanuts around. She is allergic to several other nuts too but not to the same degree. Her mother has NOTHING in her home that was manufactured in a nut factory and her brother also makes sure he doesn't eat anything with nuts in. They both read labels. We do like other nuts and I have a locked freezer in the garage for those items. Also, Sun Butter is safe for her so I would recommend that in place of peanut butter. I miss peanuts to a certain extent but then it just isn't worth it to have around. I can get over it.
Good luck!

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 2:45am
Pamela S Hughes's picture
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Joined: 02/16/2014 - 13:37

We found out our son was peanut allergic at about a year (introducing new foods) and thought it wasn't so serious because the reaction was just splotchy hives, crying, etc. but after a couple if those the next reaction was very serious. He was going into anaphylaxis this time. Now the EpiPens are required. The emergency room event that day was so scary and now we knew it was was very severe. I share this with you because just like your young child, our son stated out with reactions that weren't life-threatening, but just like our pediatrician said, it could get much more serious the next time. With cross-contamination from utensils & crumbs being a possibility, we opted to go peanut-free just to make it easier and less stressful, especially when babysitters are over. It's a personal choice. That's just what we decided and it's been really easy on the whole family knowing we're keeping him safe. I hope this helps. :)

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 3:58am
jap's picture
jap
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Joined: 08/11/2013 - 08:33

complete peanut ban of any sort including traces, done this for 15 years.It shows support and stops possible mix ups and contamination.
would you give your child candy with a made in the same factory warning, same applies to your home. nobody will die without peanut.
my wife and i get our peanut fix at a restaurant on our own or at a ice cream shop when we are out together.
My daughters school plan is posted.
http://japmrp.tumblr.com/
Julian

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 6:25am
ivegot4's picture
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Joined: 09/29/2008 - 11:45

I would recommend going completely nut free until your child is old enough to read labels and decide for himself what is safe. We have been nut free for 12 years now and knowing that everything in our home is safe for our 3 allergic kids gives me a sense of peace. Navigating food allergies at church, school, restaurants, and friend's houses is stressful enough. I need for my home to be a safe haven where my kids can go get themselves a snack or work in the kitchen without worry. My 13 year old has even told me that he loves being able to eat at home because he can be normal.
He was also 15 months when we discovered his allergies. It is scary, but manageable.

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 8:04am
Barbee's picture
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Joined: 10/27/2013 - 14:01

My youngest daughter was diagnosed at 10 months when her older brother ate PB toast and then kissed her. Her reaction was frightening and she didn't even eat it! We have 3 kids, only one with a food allergy, but we are a nut free house. Maggie needs to have at least one place where she is 100% certain she can eat whatever she wants and doesn't have to ask, "Is this safe for me?" At 4, she is now very good about asking that question and knows not to eat ANYTHING unless mom and dad ok it. Her older brother and sister (8 and 10) are very supportive and protective.

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 8:25am
kricar's picture
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Joined: 07/23/2013 - 09:10

The moment we found out our daughter had a severe peanut allergy was the last time I had any peanut products in my house. Our daughter is 3 and knows to ask before she eats anything but still I wouldn't want to take a chance. Its just not worth it.

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 2:27pm
mom1995's picture
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Joined: 11/09/2004 - 09:00

After reading so many of the posts I guess I will be the rogue. Our daughter nearly died at 18 months when I fed her a peanutbutter cookie. Which I was informed by a doctor and allergist you should not feed peanut product before the age of two. I guess I missed that page in the instruction manual when we brought her home. She was skin tested just before starting public education and then blood tested after puberty (just before middle school). When they test blood they expose the the samlpe to the protein and then count the reaction. The scale they count on is 1-100. 100 being the most extreme allergic. When they tested her blood they reported back to the allergist that they quit counting at 134 but that she continued to react. Neither the lab nor the allergist had ever seen such a level of reaction. They gave her a 5 on the 1-5 scale for peanuts. We had EVERY nut they had the ability to test for done at the same time. Every nut was a 3-4. So for her she has to be mindful of so many things. I go into such detail as I want to tell you she has never had another reaction as we have learned to live in a world filled with nuts without living in a bubble. We never made our home nut free. The world is not nut free.
She just graduated high school this weekend and she surrived 13 years of public education. There were many times when the adults did not make the right choice but she knew how to keep herself safe. Ultimately you and your family will do what gives you comfort and enables you to be safe.
There were times duriing elementary that I did require nut free classrooms because when they are little they just can not resist touching everything. But we never asked for a nut free campus .
Again I say the world is not nut free. As she is about to go off into the world and off to college I KNOW she is equiped with the skills to keep herslef safe. To ALWAYS be aware of her surroundings . To be sure that someone with her knows about her allergy where her epi-pen is and how to use it. She has had issues at school and even went threw a phase where she did not want to go to school anymore from fear. We would not let her live in fear. It is tough enough sometimes to feel empowered as a girl I was not going to let her allergy add to that. We taught her that she was not defined by her allergy but rather by how she kept herself safe and educated those around her.
I hope this helps you in your quest for knowledge and that your son never have another reaction because he learns how to LIVE with his allergy.

Posted on: Sun, 06/08/2014 - 3:49pm
dkdkdk's picture
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Joined: 08/04/2013 - 20:23

My daughter had her first reaction to peanuts at 18mos. It started with a rash on the mouth, then another, then swollen eye and the last with a swollen mouth, tongue. So you can see it gets worse with each exposure. I didn't "feed' her any peanut containing foods but she found a nut on the floor (because thats what babies do). I allowed her older sister to eat peanut butter sandwiches and she touched the knife which caused the swollen eye. I was told not to worry about any nuts other than peanuts. She ate a pistachio which caused the swollen tongue/mouth and a VERY scary trip to the ER after using the Epi Pen & Bendadryl. Not to scare you, but please take this seriously. I did not and I have learned my lesson. She has learned if you don't know whats in it, don't eat it. She deals with it very well. She is 8 now and of course very well aware. She will remove herself (if she is able to) if there is a chance nuts are around. You will do fine with him if you stay on top of it. Read labels, read labels, read labels! The 7 most common allergens (peanut being 1 of them) are required by food manufacturers to use their common name, not their scientific name. If it says "Could contain," "processed on shared equipment," "processed in the same facility," "may contain a trace"..avoid these foods. Sometimes it can be found in foods that you would never expect, such as Walmart brand Onion Soup Mix (could contain almonds), but the brand name Lipton does not state this. Have your Epi Pen/Benadryl with you 100% of the time and stored at the recommended temp. If you take the precautions seriously and have backup foods for him (for birthday parties, school functions, etc, such as frozen cupcakes) he will be ok with it. He might not like it but he will get used to it. Get as much education as you can and make sure you know how to use your Epi Pen. I have 2 older daughters and they do look out for her and are ok with not having peanuts around. The WowButter (Soy Butter) is an excellent alternative. You get used to it after awhile. I wish you the best and pray your son will be safe and still be able to enjoy the many things that will come his way!

Posted on: Mon, 06/09/2014 - 12:36am
ddvt's picture
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Joined: 06/08/2014 - 08:41

It is so good to know that your daughter will head off to college knowing how to keep herself safe, just as many other kids who have grown up in peanut- and nut-free homes will. Of course, the world is not nut-free. Making a home peanut-free does not teach that the world is nut-free, nor do we feel that we are living in a bubble - my daughter has traveled extensively both with her parents and with a group of high school students. She goes out with her friends and knows which fast food places to avoid, and how to order ice cream at Ben & Jerry's. But at the end of the day, when she does come home, she really can relax, knowing that there is less (not none, of course) risk here.

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