Another Field Trip

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 3:22am
Galette's picture
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Joined: 05/26/2004 - 09:00

Hi All,

I am so aggravated. My daughters class is going to another local school by bus and our schools district policy is no injectables on bus. So I either have to go. Or I could follow bus with her medicine. They are eating lunch there too.

So I have to find out what the circumstances are for lunch, how does that school handle peanut/treenut allergy in their lunch room. What kind of goodies are going to be given if any. Which there probably are since it seems schools are forever making any activity = food.

They are going to another elementary school to meet their pen pal from 10 am to 1 pm.

Is her lunch table going to be washed down with seperate rags before her class sits. Are they going to even eat in the lunch room or in class? If in class is it a nut free class as in her elementary class. If not what are they going to do to make the class safe for her. Would they make her sit at another table? The questions keep coming.

I mean, I am just so fed up with me always having to do all this research everytime something comes up. Now don't get me wrong I do and will always do what I have to do. But you know there is another school in another district (of course) that even tells the nut allergic families what THEY have researched to be safe food for their children to eat if they would like to buy lunch.

I do not want to go with her on the bus every single time. I want her and I to be as normal as any other child.

I just wish they would tell me that they are going to eat... and everything will be washed down night before... and so on.

But why the heck won't they let an injectible on the bus the teachers always seem to be willing to carry it. It's the school policy. I think most of you are familiar with the Good Samaritan Act. I've brought it up to them before. They just tell me it's our district policy.

I mean my father carries his nitro on him at all times. Why should my child not be allowed to have her life saving medicine on her at all times too. I've been on every bus ride and we have seen peanut shells and reeses wrappers on the floor.

She is seven and not ready to take on the responsibility to inject herself. I would probably have to fight for that too anyway.

I am going to call my allergists office. He has a dept. that handles any problems or information needed for handling nut allergy in school.

Anyway I don't know if I'm asking for any advice or just venting.

There was a time I thought nut allergy could be handled in school without taking the nut out of the school. But if it is not a nationwide plan that all schools have to abide by then I am beginning to believe it's crazy to think every one from parents to the schools can handle these situations with efficiently. Bad enough I hope no one sneezes in my daughters face after eating peanut butter everyday. I am starting to belive that they can't handle having it there.

I do wish they would just take gosh darn pb out of the schools since they cannot get it together without the mother(or father)going into defense mode. (or in there eyes pain in the *** mode)! Thanks for listening.

Galette
stay safe

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 4:28am
Greenlady's picture
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Joined: 06/30/2004 - 09:00

Oh, I hate that "policy" argument. Have you asked for a written copy of the policy? Sometimes "policy" is just another word for "We don't want to do it." If it is an actual policy, then it might be worth petitioning the school board to change it. (Obviously not for this trip, but there will no doubt be other trips in the future).
Hang in there!

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 4:41am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

at my ds's school whenever there is a field trip of any kind the teacher is required to take an emergengy back pack with her. It has a first aid kit, the phone numbers of all the kids, and my son's epi. It goes with the teacher ON THE BUS!
Th policy at your daughter's school sounds pretty crazy. What if something went wrong on the bus? Is this a public school? You might want to take this to the school board...there could be liability issues and well as access issues...ie your daughter's access to an education. Yikes.
------------------
mom to Ari(5) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (8), mild excema

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 5:28am
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

"But why the heck won't they let an injectible on the bus the teachers always seem to be willing to carry it. It's the school policy. I think most of you are familiar with the Good Samaritan Act. I've brought it up to them before. They just tell me it's our district policy."
This sounds like an illegal "policy" to me. I would ask for a copy of this policy and file a complaint with the Office for Civil Rights. [url="http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/know.html"]http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/know.html[/url]
This policy is discriminating against your daughter who has a recognized disability.
------------------
Mom to 6 1/2 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 6:02am
margaret's picture
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Joined: 11/01/2000 - 09:00

I feel your pain. See topic entitled "what would you do in this situation" in the main discussion board. In addition, I drive my children to and from school everyday because the bus company will not be held responsible for epipens. While our particular bus driver is a personal friend and happy to carry epi for the kids, the school will not do a hand-off with her at the beginning and end of the day and they do not allow the children to keep their own epipens on their person or in their backpacks. Also, their would be no contingency plan if our usual bus driver was unable to drive for any particular reason on any given day.
Margaret

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 1:27pm
Galette's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/26/2004 - 09:00

Thanks to you all,
I guarentee Monday morning I am doing it ALL!
With a smile on my face of course.
I will start at the Superintendent and ask for a written copy of their policy on this subject. And I will not stop until our lives are as similar as possible to the freedom of a non allergic child in the school. It can be more similar than this that's for sure.
Thanks you guys, stay safe
Galette

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 4:28am
Greenlady's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/30/2004 - 09:00

Oh, I hate that "policy" argument. Have you asked for a written copy of the policy? Sometimes "policy" is just another word for "We don't want to do it." If it is an actual policy, then it might be worth petitioning the school board to change it. (Obviously not for this trip, but there will no doubt be other trips in the future).
Hang in there!

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 4:41am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

at my ds's school whenever there is a field trip of any kind the teacher is required to take an emergengy back pack with her. It has a first aid kit, the phone numbers of all the kids, and my son's epi. It goes with the teacher ON THE BUS!
Th policy at your daughter's school sounds pretty crazy. What if something went wrong on the bus? Is this a public school? You might want to take this to the school board...there could be liability issues and well as access issues...ie your daughter's access to an education. Yikes.
------------------
mom to Ari(5) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (8), mild excema

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 5:28am
Momcat's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

"But why the heck won't they let an injectible on the bus the teachers always seem to be willing to carry it. It's the school policy. I think most of you are familiar with the Good Samaritan Act. I've brought it up to them before. They just tell me it's our district policy."
This sounds like an illegal "policy" to me. I would ask for a copy of this policy and file a complaint with the Office for Civil Rights. [url="http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/know.html"]http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/know.html[/url]
This policy is discriminating against your daughter who has a recognized disability.
------------------
Mom to 6 1/2 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 6:02am
margaret's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/01/2000 - 09:00

I feel your pain. See topic entitled "what would you do in this situation" in the main discussion board. In addition, I drive my children to and from school everyday because the bus company will not be held responsible for epipens. While our particular bus driver is a personal friend and happy to carry epi for the kids, the school will not do a hand-off with her at the beginning and end of the day and they do not allow the children to keep their own epipens on their person or in their backpacks. Also, their would be no contingency plan if our usual bus driver was unable to drive for any particular reason on any given day.
Margaret

Posted on: Fri, 01/20/2006 - 1:27pm
Galette's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/26/2004 - 09:00

Thanks to you all,
I guarentee Monday morning I am doing it ALL!
With a smile on my face of course.
I will start at the Superintendent and ask for a written copy of their policy on this subject. And I will not stop until our lives are as similar as possible to the freedom of a non allergic child in the school. It can be more similar than this that's for sure.
Thanks you guys, stay safe
Galette

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