Anaphylaxis?

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Hi, I'm the mom that posted recently that my 3 years old's allergy tested from mild, (last year) to more severe recently.

I have a simple and probably dumb question. Since I've been Googling for days now I am scared out of mind for my son. I was wondering are their people that are prone to anaphylaxis? Or does it depend on the severity of the allergy? Could the same person have the same ammount of peanuts one day and have an anaphylaxis response and the next day not? What are the contributing factors if anything?

BTW if anyone remembers my first post a few days ago and that I was very confused about what the doctor told me I decided to go to a new allergist. I met with my son's pediatrician and he was very helpful. We're getting the results sent to another doctor and we'll go from there.

TIA, Kate

On Sep 24, 2006

I'm glad you have found a physician that you are comfortable working with. That is very important.

Look on the bright side, too-- many people who suffer the grief of a fatal reaction were the ones who didn't know it [i]could[/i] happen to them, so you are way ahead of the game now. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Quote:

I was wondering are their people that are prone to anaphylaxis? Or does it depend on the severity of the allergy? Could the same person have the same ammount of peanuts one day and have an anaphylaxis response and the next day not? What are the contributing factors if anything?

Well, yes, yes, yes, and ummmm, anything that has an effect on your immune system in any way is a "factor." (Make sense? No? LOL!)

Seriously, this is very confusing stuff, and you have asked some really great questions. I'll do my best to answer them (as I understand it).

Anaphylaxis is evidently a certain kind of innate "ability" if you will. Like perfect pitch. (don't thank me-- I got this quote from Marianne Barber's book.. I just [i]love[/i] it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) So a Hx of anaphylaxis means you are ALWAYS at risk for anaphylaxing from any major allergic event.

Next in line? Well..... there are some allergies that are "special" that way. Peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, and insect venoms tend to be that sort. Anyone with an allergy to one of those is at risk. Period. But there are certainly people with those allergies who go a lifetime with only "minor" reactions. Some of this is probably just luck, though, because...

Peanut is especially problematic due to its total unpredictability. There is virtually no dose-response for some people with the allergy-- so your guess is correct. A tolerated exposure today could kill tomorrow. No rhyme or reason to it, really. We just look at this as "Sometimes you get lucky. Mostly not."

Other factors? Illness, pollen/dust/animal issues, stress, lack of sleep, phase of moon, wind speed and direction, tea stocks in SE Asia.... I could go on. But you get the picture. There are often contributing factors that you can identify in analyzing a major reaction... but predicting beforehand? Impossible.

Does this help? I hope so. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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