Amount of pnt protein to cause reaction

Posted on: Mon, 01/06/2003 - 4:49am
Dawn's picture
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

Forgive me for starting a new thread and not putting this in its original thread - I can't find it! Maybe someone knows where it is and can help me get it there? Anyway...
I KNEW I'd read this before and today, while searching my files to prepare a presentation for my son's new Pre-K class, I came across it!
[url="http://www.cbc.ca/consumers/market/files/health/peanuts/howmuch.html"]www.cbc.ca/consumers/market/files/health/peanuts/howmuch.html[/url]
This article talks about studies done to prove that minute amounts of peanut protein (as little as 1/2000th) can cause a reaction.
Now if I could only find my car keys...

Posted on: Mon, 01/06/2003 - 4:58am
Dawn's picture
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

Here's another link (hopefully it works) to an abstract of another article.
Yikes- it doesn't work...I got into the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and did a search for peanut protein. I'll work on the link...
[This message has been edited by Dawn (edited January 06, 2003).]

Posted on: Thu, 01/09/2003 - 11:56pm
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

I would be careful about confusing them with scientific research. I told my child's school what I knew. Peanuts are the most toxic allergen known to man. Any amount can be fatal.
A failure to act immediately with a "wait and see" attitude is what kills most children allergic to peanuts.
You wouldn't want some well meaning teacher to decide for her/himself how much is too much.
Good luck
Peg541

Posted on: Fri, 01/10/2003 - 12:05am
Annshel's picture
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Joined: 05/30/2002 - 09:00

Good point Peg! Hadn't thought about that. You can confuse them with too much information. I guess there is a fine line. This site is so great. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 01/10/2003 - 3:34am
Dawn's picture
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

Yes, I agree, scientific research would only confuse them...I was just looking for backup to what I thought I knew, that the amount of protein that could cause a reaction is teeny-tiny. I wanted to be able to express to them, for example, that a bit of pb under a fingernail has the potential to cause an anaphylactic reacion. I want support for the idea of washing their hands after they eat. Josh's school is not pnt free and some families in his class are resistant to the idea of not sending pb&j sandwiches, so I am trying to come up with ways to handle the situation.
I just thought someone might be interested in the fact that there is actual, scientific research regarding the claim of 1/2000th of a peanut being dangerous.
I also agree that I would never want a teacher to decide how much might cause a reaction!!! Our policy is that if ingestion is suspected, give the Epi- don't wait for symptoms.
------------------
Be safe,
~Dawn~
[This message has been edited by Dawn (edited January 10, 2003).]

Posted on: Sat, 01/11/2003 - 12:27am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Here's another link that has alot of information on stats and research.
[url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm"]http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm[/url]

Posted on: Sat, 01/11/2003 - 7:13am
cynde's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

You need support for the idea of having them wash their hands after they eat?!?! Talk to your local public health nurse, everyone should wash their hands before and after eating for health reasons, whether their is a PA child in the class or not.
------------------
Cynde

Posted on: Sat, 01/11/2003 - 8:56am
helenmc's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2002 - 09:00

Dawn,
The thread you wanted to find is "Patients with Severe Peanut Allergy Symptoms React to Lower Doses" by River in the Media section. It was posted on New Year's Day.
I wonder - does 1/2000th PN qualify as "an invisible amount" of PN??? I sure know the airborne PN particles I reacted to were invisible...
Telling others that the amount of allergen that can cause anaphylaxis is too small to see might help get the message across.
Helen and Geoff

Posted on: Sat, 01/11/2003 - 9:47am
Dawn's picture
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

Thanks, Helen. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I chose to use the idea of a bit of pb&j sandwich under the fingernails and it was very effective, but I did mention 1/2000th of a peanut and their eyes went wide.
------------------
Be safe,
~Dawn~

Posted on: Sat, 01/11/2003 - 9:55am
helenmc's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2002 - 09:00

No worries Dawn,
So glad I live here - Aussies think of much of pb&j as you guys do of Vegemite! (ie, yuck!).
It just isn't something people eat out here. In any case, 'jelly' to us is your 'jello' and our'jam' is your 'jelly'...in any case, eating pb&j would be unAustralian!!!

Posted on: Sun, 01/12/2003 - 1:55am
helenmc's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2002 - 09:00

Middle of the night here - can't sleep.
Just looked at the article again. It refers to reactions from less than 3 milligrams (0.003 g) of PN protein.
Not sure what people think if when they think of a 2000th of a nut, so these numbers might be a bit more repeatable!

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