\"Allergy Nation\" Child Magazine article

Posted on: Wed, 03/14/2007 - 11:03am
GinaC's picture
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Joined: 11/11/2006 - 09:00

Hello all,
There is a good article in April's child magazine on the social/emotional affects of food allergies on the child, his/her parents, schools and families.

I was interviewed for it and have gotten such a positive response from parents who do NOT have an allergic child--very supportive of what parents of allergic children go through.

It's on newstands now. Here is a link it online.

[url="http://www.child.com/child/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/child/story..."]http://www.child.com/child/story.jhtml?s...4395.xml&page=1[/url]

Take care,
Gina
[url="http://www.allergymoms.com"]www.allergymoms.com[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 03/14/2007 - 3:03pm
Nutternomore's picture
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Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

Gina,
Thanks for posting.
Once again, there is FAAN with that "false sense of security" cr*p which just totally undermines the efforts of parents for those in the early elementary school grades.I thought Anne M-F was finally going to stop with the negative propaganda, but I guess old habits die hard. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
I was glad to see that the article did shed some light on the potential social isolation issues that can arise due to isolation of students (i.e. peanut-free tables). This subject usually doesn't get much press, although we've had some good discussions here about various approaches to the subject to balance safety with social normalcy.

Posted on: Wed, 03/14/2007 - 10:30pm
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Excellent article, that really tells it like it is.
Amy

Posted on: Wed, 03/14/2007 - 11:08pm
GinaC's picture
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Joined: 11/11/2006 - 09:00

I am always bothered when they mention the study by Dr Sicherer on Casual contact.
They rubbed peanut butter on the middle of the backs of these children and then they wiped it off after one minute.
First, we all know that any casual contact in real life in young children would mean that it was on their hands, which then go in their mouths, their noses, eyes etc.
Next, it often would not be wiped off after ONE minute.
I'm not even saying that casual contact is a danger or is not a danger. I just dont see how or why THIS study keeps being referenced when I dont think it shows casual contact in any real way.
To me, its like saying, cold germs dont travel from person to person because we rubbed cold germs in the middle of kids backs and wiped them off in one minute, and guess what? they didnt get a cold.
what am I missing with this study?
[url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12847496&dopt=Abstract"]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query...6&dopt=Abstract[/url]
also, if you liked the article, let the magazine know so they do more on food allergies.
You can email them at [email]mailcenter@meredith.com[/email]
Take care,
Gina
[url="http://www.allergymoms.com"]www.allergymoms.com[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 03/15/2007 - 12:35am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

There's that Dr. Sanghavi again, saying that parents are just paranoid. That's the kind of comment in a general interest parenting magazine that's going to make people doubt us when we really do need to take precautions. He's talking about false positive test results, which has its place. But most people out there being really careful about a PA really do know they have it. I don't need other mothers speculating that I'm worrying too much and maybe my DD really doesn't have a LTFA; I know from actual experience that she does.
The article in general is pretty good, going into more depth than most. There's just so much skepticism, though. I'm glad they talked to people who actually deal with this in real life like you, Gina.
And I agree with you on the peanut butter on the back study. Your analogy to germ transmission is a good one. It might prove that skin absorption alone isn't an issue, but it doesn't show that coming into contact with peanut butter on surfaces isn't a danger. Why do they talk about surfaces like door knobs and telephones being a germ transmission danger but balk at the idea of peanut butter residue on surfaces being an allergic risk?

Posted on: Thu, 03/15/2007 - 12:41am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by GinaC:
[b]I am always bothered when they mention the study by Dr Sicherer on Casual contact.
what am I missing with this study?[/b]
My allergist doesn't think you are missing anything. . . he says exactly the same thing.
I remember him explaining that study to me and saying that as a 'first' study looking at the issue it was appropriate that is was very limited in scope. He created his own 'contact challenge' for my daughter just after the article was published. He thought using cleaned markers previously contaminated was more reflective of the type of contact exposure a child would experience.
I think the reason that the study is so often cited is because it's the only one available on contact exposure. I agree with you that it's a shame that the very most basic information about this study are left out when it's cited in mainstream media. An example/reminder of why it's so important to me as a parent to be familiar with these studies.
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 15, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 03/15/2007 - 2:33am
GinaC's picture
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Joined: 11/11/2006 - 09:00

" Why do they talk about surfaces like door knobs and telephones being a germ transmission danger but balk at the idea of peanut butter residue on surfaces being an allergic risk?"
Good question.
Of course a magazine like Child will have to present both sides but I really believe that "we" allergy parents came out on top here. From the supportive emails that I am receiving from non-allergy parents. Most are appalled by what they have read.
We just need to overcome the notion that some have that "we" are trying to control them---all we are really trying to do is make sure our kids are safe.
Take care,
Gina
[url="http://www.allergymoms.com"]www.allergymoms.com[/url]
PS You can contact or blog w/the author of the article at [url="http://www.pamelakruger.com/blog"]www.pamelakruger.com/blog[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 03/15/2007 - 5:06am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

OK, just incase there's anybody here who has NOT seen my previous response to the theory of "TOO CLEAN" as to PA reason -- as cited in article's FINAL paragraph --
[i]
The most popular theory is the hygiene hypothesis, which suggests that as our environment has become more hygienic

Posted on: Thu, 03/15/2007 - 5:13am
gvmom's picture
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Joined: 08/24/2005 - 09:00

[b]I was glad to see that the article did shed some light on the potential social isolation issues that can arise due to isolation of students (i.e. peanut-free tables). This subject usually doesn't get much press, although we've had some good discussions here about various approaches to the subject to balance safety with social normalcy.[/b]
Funny that this would come up -- the PA-free table -- you know, given the timing in my life. Within my discussion with my OCR contact, the idea of a nut-free table came up. That the school wanted to do one. Of the comments that I can put here, off the top of my head, was one to the effect that segregation was illegal. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
I thought on the whole, the article was really good, and I printed it out to add to my growing binder related to FA's.
Thanks for posting the article Gina.

Posted on: Thu, 03/15/2007 - 1:45pm
NoPeanutsPlease.com's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2007 - 09:00

I blogged about this article last night as well. I referred to the parents in questions as 'peanut terrorists' and that pretty much sums up my opinion on the matter.
I try to take a moderate, pragmatic approach to our daughter's anaphylaxis to peanut, but the fact that other people could go beyond simple disagreement and deliberately risk the life of other children is shocking ... how do they live with themselves? (It actually feels criminal to me on a couple of levels.)
It was a good article but I wish I didn't read it to be honest. Best to be aware of these scenarios I suppose, but it was very upsetting to read. I am stuck with a mental image of my daughter's face on the child who ended up in the hospital.
It's just sad. I need to go give her a hug just writing this.
NP.
------------------
[url="http://www.NoPeanutsPlease.com"]www.NoPeanutsPlease.com[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 03/16/2007 - 12:07am
mommyofmatt's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2004 - 09:00

Thank you for posting Gina! All in all, I thought the article was very good, with the exceptions the others have already pointed out. I liked that it summarized alot of the research/statistics floated out there, and also explained how those could be "soft" numbers. I think that's important -- the numbers are most likely soft IMHO, and while 1 death is too many, it presents that there could possibly be more than the number cited. And I like that it addressed social issues for families. I think this is a good article to pass on to family and friends.
Thanks again! Meg

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