New to all this...

Posted on: Fri, 02/01/2013 - 9:35am
ShayandBlakesMommy's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2013 - 16:17

Hello,

My son is almost 5 months old & he's been plagued with eczema since around 2 months old. It started at his scalp/face & has since spread to his entire body. He recently had a RAST (not a CapRAST) done & came back positive for wheat & peanuts. According to Labcorp's test/scale, his scores were .36 for peanut (class 2) & .60 for wheat (class 3). The doc said that since he's so young & his immune system's still developing, that these results weren't 100% reliable. But I've since (for a little over a week now) cut out all wheat & peanuts from my diet (I'm nursing)...which has been hard since I'm a carb & peanut butter-aholic. :|
I guess I'm looking for any hope that my son will outgrow these allergies. Not sure how long it takes to see results, but so far I haven't seen any improvement in his skin as a result of the new diet. He did look a whole lot better (not 100% though) after 2 uses of "Desonide," the steroid cream the doc gave us. The 1st perscription the doc recommended (Dermasmooth) had peanut oil in it & I didn't want to take a chance!
On another note, I'm finding conflicting RAST scales online though & am confused. If anyone can shed some light on any of this, I'd be very grateful!!

Posted on: Tue, 02/05/2013 - 7:16am
NoahTsmom's picture
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Joined: 02/05/2013 - 14:08

I'm sorry that I don't have a certain answer for you, but I felt compelled to reach out to you anyway. I would think that within the next couple of weeks you would see some improvement. I had to maintain a dairy-free diet when I was nursing and when I would make a mistake, the resulting discomfort (crying nearly all the time) would last nearly a week in my daughter...I was told by a dietician that the milk protein would stay in my body for perhaps as much as a week, so there would still be some of it in the milk I was producing. Perhaps you are dealing with a similar situation?
My son is Peanut and tree-nut allergic. He outgrew an egg allergy. We found out that he was allergic by way of an anaphylactic reaction. Since he was 13 months old, we have maintained a house that is contains nothing but food that he can consume. It was a difficult transition, but once we got the hange of it, it is very livable. I trust that you will find solutions that you can live with as well...have faith that it will improve over time, and that you will get through this, even if he doesn't outgrown his allergies.

Posted on: Tue, 02/05/2013 - 1:00pm
ShayandBlakesMommy's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2013 - 16:17

Thanks so much for your resonse--I really do appreciate any feedback. This whole thing has just been hard to wrap my head around since I've preactically lived on PB&J's my whole life...& on every type of bread product imagineable. Reading the stories on this site breaks my heart. I'm so sorry you had to find out about your son's allergy the way you did--cannot fathom. Food allergies of any kind are such a vicious plague. I'm gonna be paranoid when he's old enough to start eating real food...We need to get him thoroughly tested so we don't have any terrifiying surprises. I can't imagine life w/either of my son's current allergies & I'm really hoping & praying they just disappear. :\ They say there's a 20% chance of outgrowing PN allergies...so hoping he's that 1 in 5. Thanks again for reaching out!

Posted on: Sun, 02/10/2013 - 10:33am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I'll first start by saying I am not a doctor. I do, however, know a fair amount about pharmacology, and medicine in general. Eczema is quite common in babies and usually controllable with a steroid cream. It's good you played it safe and didn't administer the "Derma-Smoothe" cream. Desonide is an acceptable alternative to the "Derma-Smoothe". You should notice his eczema gets better and the redness, dryness, etc gets under control, plus you already said you saw a bit of a difference already. It's good you've cut out the peanuts etc, so you are not putting it into your son while breastfeeding. Also you may want to avoid other nuts, and not allow him to eat other types of nuts either. I know peanuts are legumes, and tree nuts, are different, but I've read that a lot of people with peanut allergies, also have an allergy to the tree nuts. So maybe you should discuss that with an allergist or pediatrician. Those tests you did which showed your son had the allergies are not 100% accurate all the time. That does not mean they are useless, you should definitely play it safe and get more allergy testing done at the appropriate times as your son ages because those tests will most likely change as his immunity is built. You didn't specify whether you were taking your son to an allergist or his pediatrician. If you are doing all of this allergy testing with a pediatrician and are not getting the answers you would like or feel the pediatrician isn't as knowledgeable as they could be, it might be good to see an allergy specialist. Also, if you are concerned about your sons skin issues, and find he's not getting enough relief from the steroid creams prescribed to him, or you feel there might be something else that can be done but your doctor isn't really knowledgeable about them, a pediatric dermatologist may be a good doctor to see. Oh, and by the way, I suffered from severe eczema at your sons age, and it went away by age 12. I'm 27 now and it has not returned. There is definitely hope for your son, he's just a 5 month old, don't give up hope, because many people have issues they grow out of, or that get much better over time. Good luck!

Posted on: Fri, 03/15/2013 - 4:20am
ShayandBlakesMommy's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2013 - 16:17

Thanks so much for your reply. Yes, we're taking him to an allergist now, but I wasn't all that impressed with him. I'm glad I read & educate myself on things bc you really can't rely on doctors. :| Anyway, I insisted that my son had a pin prick test done on several things, & he came back with no allergy to peanuts nor wheat & he was a 5 to dairy! Keep in mind, the RAST he had done showed no allergy to dairy. Since then, I've switched my exclusion diet to no milk products (since I've read that skin testing is more accurate than blood, especially the RAST) & have been on this for about 2 1/2 weeks. My son's eczema hasn't completely disappeared yet, but I've read it takes a month to see improvement in nursing infants. But it has definitely improved. We've also since stopped using the steroid cream completely. The allergist said we shouldn't be using it that much & not on his face (which is primarily where we were using it...). We're now using Vanicream & Aquaphor. But after reading stuff on this site about how skin tests could be wrong too, I'm thoroughly confused...at the time of his RAST, I was eating everything (wheat, nuts, dairy, etc). But, at the time of his skin prick test, I wasn't eating wheat or nuts. I asked the allergist if this would've given a false negative for those & he said no...but I've read otherwise. I'm thinking of having my son CapRAST tested for wheat, nuts, & dairy now, just to be sure. I think I may re-post this info to get some more feedback. I need some answers. :\

Posted on: Mon, 04/22/2013 - 5:31am
Sarah McKenzie's picture
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Joined: 04/08/2013 - 07:37

My story is somewhat similar to you so maybe I can give you some help... My son, who is 22 months now, has had eczema almost his entire life. Also, he was VERY and I do mean VERY colicky as a baby. He went to a dermatologist and they subscribed cream etc. After 1 heartbreaking anaphylactic reaction to PB, we took him to the allergist. Long story short Class 3 for Eggs & Class 4 for all Nuts.
His eczema has improved some since being off the eggs, still a constant battle though. Our derm told us 3 to 4 days of being off the eggs we should see an improvement. Illness, weather etc play so much a part of how his skin is doing.
My husband and I got rid of all potential hazards to him in our house, we don't eat them in the car or even if we are near him. I can tell you that the anaphylactic reactions (actually had two)are NOT worth it. Nothing is worth your babies well being.
I will read the internet but ultimately I believe what the Dr's tell us.
Good luck, I hope this is something your baby outgrows and it truly stinks!

Posted on: Fri, 05/22/2020 - 12:57pm
Sarah McKenzie's picture
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Joined: 04/08/2013 - 07:37

My story is somewhat similar to you so maybe I can give you some help... My son, who is 22 months now, has had eczema almost his entire life. Also, he was VERY and I do mean VERY colicky as a baby. He went to a dermatologist and they subscribed cream etc. After 1 heartbreaking anaphylactic reaction to PB, we took him to the allergist. Long story short Class 3 for Eggs & Class 4 for all Nuts.
His eczema has improved some since being off the eggs, still a constant battle though. Our derm told us 3 to 4 days of being off the eggs we should see an improvement. Illness, weather etc play so much a part of how his skin is doing.
My husband and I got rid of all potential hazards to him in our house, we don't eat them in the car or even if we are near him. I can tell you that the anaphylactic reactions (actually had two)are NOT worth it. Nothing is worth your babies well being.
I will read the internet but ultimately I believe what the Dr's tell us.
Good luck, I hope this is something your baby outgrows and it truly stinks!

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