Airborn via Dishwasher?

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 6:53pm
Tom's picture
Tom
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Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

Long story, sorry. My wife has two daughters, who love peanut butter. When we first 'consolidated our living spaces' I made it very clear to them they had to be careful with the stuff, not to get it on anything, and to wash their dishes off really well after eating pb. For the most part they were pretty good with this. But eventually I had a reaction after one of them ate pb sandwhich. As far as I can tell, she probably put the dishes into the dishwasher without rinsing them completely. It's my theory that the pb got somehow aspirated into the air through the dishwasher, probably venting steam. I couldn't breath anywhere in the house, it was like an asthma attack. It was the dead of winter, but I opened the windows and doors and aired the place out for about 2 hours. That seemed to help, and the reaction went away after that.

Needless to say, after that i banned pb in the house. This was years ago and I've never had the same problem again. But it's my opinion that the pb was vented into the air via the dishwasher.

Anyone ever have a similar situation?

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 7:33pm
williamsmummy's picture
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Joined: 03/26/2002 - 09:00

This is a difficult situation.
However , I do think that the dishwasher is a safe way to remove the allergen. IMO .
As for the airbourne factor, well , its a very , very small risk .
I have never heard if airbourne reactions from a dishwasher.
There has been a reported and confirmed death caused by microwave being used.
But this is also incredibly rare IMO.
This was a woman who was allergic to kidney beans and a family member heated up a meal in a microwave for a while, and this sparked of a reaction.
But other factors do add to a reaction, perhaps this woman had no previous problem with microwaved food . But perhaps her health was compromised in some way that day that lead to mild irritation , going in to full blown anaphylaxis.
Do not discount the fact that traces of peanut butter may be in the kitchen area, or your home . Its more likey that you are reacting to a trace of peanut butter from another source, rather than the dishwasher.
Perhaps its time to add a few more safety rules to prepareing and eating food in your home that you are allergic to.
For instance , as my son has so many allergies we do have them in the house.
If the children are eating eggs or baked beans for e.g the rules are to eat at the table and get up and wash hands straight away after eating.
Without touching door handles .
They also are aware that food should not be played with , splashed around and no one should touch william with contaminated hands.
I take responsibilty as an adult for removing all traces of allergenic food in the kitchen.
The older children are teenagers , so basic life skills are learnt in cleaning and hygeine.( BTw its not easy they are driving me doo lally !!) Which are more than enough to eliminate the risk factor.
Your other choice is to ask that peanut butter should be removed. Perhaps if you are not allergic to sunflower seeds you could bring sun butter in to the house instead as a replacement.
Take your mild reaction as a warning to improve allergy avoidance. I know that its very easy to start worrying if your allergy has changed for the worse after a reaction when you cant trace the cause.
Keep posting, welcome to this site.
sarah
mummy to william (and others)
allergies to long to type. oh, we are in the UK.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 7:37pm
Tom's picture
Tom
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Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

As I said, peanuts and pb are completely banned in the house now, and have been for years. The only reason I think the dishwasher caused it to go airborn was after I aired out the house I was fine. And the dishwasher was running when the attack started. Normally residue does not bother me. This was sort of like an asthma attack, it wasn't indicative of an ingestion attack at all. More like I breathed in the allergen to cause the problem.
[This message has been edited by Tom (edited January 24, 2006).]

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 12:39am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

That's very interesting. Steam certainly comes out of the dishwasher when it's running. My DD had a reaction once after other people had eaten peanut butter, and we think it was either on the tablecloth where she set down her fork or left on the fork or her glass after washing dishes in the sink. It could be that the fork or glass didn't get all the peanut butter residue washed off, or that it transferred in the water -- I've read that that does happen when dishes with peanut butter on them are washed in a sink. So you always have to consider that traces could be around on surfaces to cause a reaction. But with the way steam really issues from the dishwasher while it's still washing, I'd believe it.

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 4:20am
ajgauthier's picture
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Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

I can believe your reaction was from dishwasher steam. If she left a lot of PB (like a tsp worth or so) on the plate, the first hot rinse of the dishwasher uses no soap. Just a hot water rinse. I'd say this is where the contaminated steam comes from.
I've had a similar issue at my sister's house...she likes to pile PB on top of icecream. I think one day she didn't rinse the mug out completely and just tossed it in the dishwasher. I came home after the dishes where all done (like a 2 hour cycle), and my GAWD the house smelled horrible! I asked her if she was making pb cookies or a grilled PB sandwich...she said no. After some investigation I determined it was her icecream mug from the night before! I didn't have a serious reaction, but I could smell the PB nastiness!
Glad you have banned PB in your house!
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 5:43am
Tom's picture
Tom
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Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

The thing is, the peanut butter must have been washed off the dishes sufficiently, because I didn't have any reactions after that from the dishes. So I'm not sure, but I heavily suspect the dishwasher. I can't think of any other reason for it to be in the air.

Posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 12:09am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

When I'm in a rush I don't always rinse the dishes. Sometimes when the dishwasher is running, you can smell what we had for dinner. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img] Seems totally logical to me that if someone was allergic to what we ate they could react to the odour from the dishwasher.
Tom, my kids grew up eating pb. When I developed my allergies we started with *you have to be very careful* but, after a few reactions we had to ban it from our home as well.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 7:33pm
williamsmummy's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/26/2002 - 09:00

This is a difficult situation.
However , I do think that the dishwasher is a safe way to remove the allergen. IMO .
As for the airbourne factor, well , its a very , very small risk .
I have never heard if airbourne reactions from a dishwasher.
There has been a reported and confirmed death caused by microwave being used.
But this is also incredibly rare IMO.
This was a woman who was allergic to kidney beans and a family member heated up a meal in a microwave for a while, and this sparked of a reaction.
But other factors do add to a reaction, perhaps this woman had no previous problem with microwaved food . But perhaps her health was compromised in some way that day that lead to mild irritation , going in to full blown anaphylaxis.
Do not discount the fact that traces of peanut butter may be in the kitchen area, or your home . Its more likey that you are reacting to a trace of peanut butter from another source, rather than the dishwasher.
Perhaps its time to add a few more safety rules to prepareing and eating food in your home that you are allergic to.
For instance , as my son has so many allergies we do have them in the house.
If the children are eating eggs or baked beans for e.g the rules are to eat at the table and get up and wash hands straight away after eating.
Without touching door handles .
They also are aware that food should not be played with , splashed around and no one should touch william with contaminated hands.
I take responsibilty as an adult for removing all traces of allergenic food in the kitchen.
The older children are teenagers , so basic life skills are learnt in cleaning and hygeine.( BTw its not easy they are driving me doo lally !!) Which are more than enough to eliminate the risk factor.
Your other choice is to ask that peanut butter should be removed. Perhaps if you are not allergic to sunflower seeds you could bring sun butter in to the house instead as a replacement.
Take your mild reaction as a warning to improve allergy avoidance. I know that its very easy to start worrying if your allergy has changed for the worse after a reaction when you cant trace the cause.
Keep posting, welcome to this site.
sarah
mummy to william (and others)
allergies to long to type. oh, we are in the UK.

Posted on: Mon, 01/23/2006 - 7:37pm
Tom's picture
Tom
Offline
Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

As I said, peanuts and pb are completely banned in the house now, and have been for years. The only reason I think the dishwasher caused it to go airborn was after I aired out the house I was fine. And the dishwasher was running when the attack started. Normally residue does not bother me. This was sort of like an asthma attack, it wasn't indicative of an ingestion attack at all. More like I breathed in the allergen to cause the problem.
[This message has been edited by Tom (edited January 24, 2006).]

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 12:39am
bethc's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

That's very interesting. Steam certainly comes out of the dishwasher when it's running. My DD had a reaction once after other people had eaten peanut butter, and we think it was either on the tablecloth where she set down her fork or left on the fork or her glass after washing dishes in the sink. It could be that the fork or glass didn't get all the peanut butter residue washed off, or that it transferred in the water -- I've read that that does happen when dishes with peanut butter on them are washed in a sink. So you always have to consider that traces could be around on surfaces to cause a reaction. But with the way steam really issues from the dishwasher while it's still washing, I'd believe it.

Posted on: Tue, 01/24/2006 - 4:20am
ajgauthier's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

I can believe your reaction was from dishwasher steam. If she left a lot of PB (like a tsp worth or so) on the plate, the first hot rinse of the dishwasher uses no soap. Just a hot water rinse. I'd say this is where the contaminated steam comes from.
I've had a similar issue at my sister's house...she likes to pile PB on top of icecream. I think one day she didn't rinse the mug out completely and just tossed it in the dishwasher. I came home after the dishes where all done (like a 2 hour cycle), and my GAWD the house smelled horrible! I asked her if she was making pb cookies or a grilled PB sandwich...she said no. After some investigation I determined it was her icecream mug from the night before! I didn't have a serious reaction, but I could smell the PB nastiness!
Glad you have banned PB in your house!
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

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