Accommodating Children with Special Dietary Needs in the School Nutrition Programs

Posted on: Fri, 11/07/2003 - 9:46am
cathlina's picture
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Joined: 06/29/2001 - 09:00

Go to:

[url="http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Guidance/default.htm"]http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Guidance/default.htm[/url]

Click on the PDF file called.

Accommodating Children with Special Dietary Needs in the School Nutrition Programs

This federal document talks about food allergy and when a food allergy is considered a disability.

For anyone having trouble getting a school to cooperate about when peanut allergy is a disability....well...here it is in a govt. document.

Posted on: Fri, 11/07/2003 - 10:14am
Dawn's picture
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

Yeah! Great link...one more document for our arsenal! Thank you so much!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 11/07/2003 - 11:01am
momma2boys's picture
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"In Cases of Food Allergy
Generally, children with food allergies or intolerances do not have a disability as defined under either Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act or Part B of IDEA, and the school food service may, but is not required to, make food substitutions for them.
However, when in the licensed physician's assessment, food allergies may result in severe, life-threatening (anaphylactic) reactions, the child's condition would meet the definition of "disability", and the substitutions prescribed by the licensed physician must be made."
~Just wondering how far a physician could go in their demands? ~

Posted on: Fri, 11/07/2003 - 11:16am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by momma2boys:
[B~Just wondering how far a physician could go in their demands? ~[/B]
Possibly a [b]"Full Time School Nurse"?[/b]
Is this (just for example) mentioned in any position statements by medical associations?
If it is, would it considered a "substitution"? (as described in the excerpt?)
If so, [i]would that determine what is "reasonable"?[/i]
My questions just go round and round.
Hoping Rhonda sees this to comment.

Posted on: Fri, 11/07/2003 - 11:20am
MommaBear's picture
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Oh, fiddlesticks.
disregard my prior post, as thought we were talking the school environment as a whole, not just School Nutrition Programs.
Rats.

Posted on: Fri, 11/07/2003 - 5:41pm
Nutternomore's picture
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Here's an excerpt that relates to guidance for a student with severe peanut allergies...
B. SPECIAL NEEDS WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT INVOLVE DISABILITIES
Situation 4:
A child has a life threatening allergy which causes an anaphylactic reaction to peanuts. The slightest contact with peanuts or peanut derivatives, usually peanut oil, could be fatal. To what lengths must the food service go to accommodate the child? Is it sufficient for the school food service to merely avoid obvious foods, such as peanut butter, or must school food service staff research every ingredient and additive in processed foods or regularly post all of the ingredients used in recipes?
Response:
The school has the responsibility to provide a safe, non-allergic meal to the child if it is determined that the condition is disabling. To do so, school food service staff must make sure that all food items offered to the allergic child meet prescribed guidelines and are free of foods which are suspected of causing the allergic reaction.
This means that the food labels or specifications will need to be checked to ensure that they do not contain traces of such substances. In some cases, the labels will provide enough information to make a reasonable judgment possible. If they do not provide enough information, it is the responsibility of the school food service to obtain the necessary information to ensure that no allergic substances are present in the foods served.
In some cases, it may be necessary to contact the supplier or the manufacturer or to check with the State agency. Private organizations, such as the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (see Appendix D), may also be consulted for information and advice. It is also wise to check with parents about certain foods and even provide them with advance copies of menus.
The general rule in these situations is to exercise caution at all times. Do not serve foods to children at risk for anaphylactic reactions, if you do not know what is in those foods. It is important to recognize that a child may be provided a meal, which is equivalent to the meal served to other children, but not necessarily the same meal.
Sometimes, it will be advisable to prepare a separate meal "from scratch" using ingredients that are allowed on the special diet rather than serving a meal using processed foods.
[This message has been edited by Nutternomore (edited November 08, 2003).]

Posted on: Sat, 11/08/2003 - 12:35am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Nutternomore:
[b]Here's an excerpt that relates to guidance for a student with severe peanut allergies...
The general rule in these situations is to exercise caution at all times. Do not serve foods to children at risk for anaphylactic reactions, if you do not know what is in those foods. It is important to recognize that a child may be provided a meal, which is equivalent to the meal served to other children, but not necessarily the same meal.
[/b]
After reading this I had "that" feeling. What "that" feeling translated to:
With regard to my child and only my child and not as a recommendation or advice to anyone else, as I can only speak for my child, my family, and our highly individual and unique situation:
*Personally?* I'd rather have the school remove PB sandwitches from the Federal Brown Bag Lunch Program choices (as was the case in my son's situation), that was offered to entire student body............ and provide his meals and food items [i]myself[/i]. I didn't want him eating (at his age and situation) foods prepared or offered to him from others regardless of how "safe" they believed them to be. (Will note that wasn't my "carte blanche" approval to bring [i]just anything[/i] into the classroom. Just more "cut and dried" that way. *Personally?* Easier to define, Easier to enforce, Easier to achieve. For those involved AND my child (at his age and situation during the time period I reference).
**I have often noted in some situations that when the difficulty of a task increases, so does the level of non-compliance.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited November 08, 2003).]

Posted on: Sat, 11/08/2003 - 5:28am
momma2boys's picture
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Mommmabear, I agree with you 100 percent!

Posted on: Wed, 11/12/2003 - 11:54am
tkiamly's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

My PA, wheat, treenut, egg, dairy allergic son starts kindergarten fall 2004. I downloaded the information on accomodating children with special dietary needs. While I personally plan to pack his "safe" lunch myself I feel having this info. as an arsenal will help since my husband and I plan to require the school to warm his lunches when applicable so that he can have a "hot lunch" some days instead of always the same old things. Thanks for all the information and references provided here!!!
tkiamly

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