AAAAI Press Release:Advances in the treatment and diagnosis of food allergy

Posted on: Mon, 03/22/2004 - 3:21am
Nutternomore's picture
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Fasten your seat belts - there are alot of findings listed here!

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[url="http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2004/03/032204a.stm"]http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2004/03/032204a.stm[/url]

FOR EMBARGOED RELEASE
Monday March 22, 2004, 12 p.m. Eastern Time
Contact: John Gardner (jgardner@aaaai.org)
Trisha Downs (tdowns@aaaai.org)
Ph: (414) 272-6071

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Advances in the treatment and diagnosis of food allergy
presented at the 2004 AAAAI Annual Meeting

[b]Major peanut allergen not widely distributed in schools[/b]
(SAN FRANCISCO, March 22, 2004) The major peanut allergen, Ara h 1, does not appear to be widely distributed in schools, according to a study presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's (AAAAI) 2004 Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Tamara T. Perry, MD, and colleagues from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine examined several factors: peanut allergen on surfaces in schools, the presence of residual peanut protein after using cleaning products, and airborne peanut protein when people were eating several forms of peanut.

After cleaning hands with liquid soap, bar soap or commercial wipes, the peanut allergen was undetectable. However, plain water and antibacterial hand sanitizer left detectable peanut allergen on 3/10 hands. Common household cleaning agents, except dishwashing liquid, easily removed peanut allergen from tabletops.

Despite fear of airborne peanut allergens, the study was unable to detect any after simulating real-life situations when peanut butter, shelled peanuts and unshelled peanuts were consumed.

[b]Sensitivity to Dietary Proteins released in Breast Milk Causing Colic in Infants[/b]
Colic in breast-fed infants younger than 6 weeks of age is associated with intolerance to dietary proteins excreted in breast milk. These findings were presented today at the 2004 AAAAI Annual Meeting in San Francisco

Over a seven-day period, David J Hill, FAAAAI, and colleagues from Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, studied breastfed infants with colic less than 6 weeks old. Mothers were randomly assigned to a "low-allergen" diet that excluded milk, egg, wheat, peanut, tree nuts and fish or a "control" diet that included these foods.

Ninety infants completed the program; 47 receiving the "low allergen" and 43 the "control" diet. More children in the "low-allergen" group (74%) than in the control group (34%) saw a 25%decrease in their distress. In the last 48 hours of the study, the "low-allergen" group had 128 minutes less distress than the "control" group.

The results of this study suggest that breast fed infants less than 6 weeks of age with colic may be allergic to trace amounts of dietary protein normally excreted in breast milk. The researchers found that breastfed infants less than 6 weeks old respond positively when breastfeeding mothers are placed on a low allergen diet.

[b]Prevalence of self-reported seafood allergy in the United States[/b]
Self-reported, physician diagnosed and/or convincing allergy to seafood is reported by 2.3% of the general population, or an estimated 6.5 million Americans, according to a study presented at the 2004 AAAAI Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Scott Sicherer, MD, FAAAAI, and colleagues from Mount Sinai School of Medicine surveyed 5,529 households in a nationwide, cross-sectional, random sample telephone interview using a standardized questionnaire and predetermined criteria to indicate seafood allergy.

The study found:

2.8% of adults and 0.6% of children under the age of 18 reported allergy to some seafood
Multiple reactions were reported by 53% for fish and 57% for shellfish allergy
Medical care was sought by 55% with fish and 40% with shellfish
Researchers found that the most common offending foods were salmon, tuna and halibut among fish and shrimp, crab and lobster among shellfish.

[b]Common food allergens found in pediatric skin care products[/b]
Common allergenic foods are widely present in all types of pediatric skin care products, which may represent a previously unknown source of exposure, according to a study presented at the 2004 AAAAI Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Kelly K.M. Newhall, MD, and colleagues from Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago, examined 293 pediatric skin care products (PSCPs). The PSCPs labels were reviewed and vague ingredients like "fragrances" and "vegetables" were identified by manufacturers. The common allergenic foods (CAFs) recorded were cow milk, soy, wheat, egg, peanut, hydrolyzed soy and tree nuts.

Results from the study:

26.6% of the products contained CAFs and 46% contained other foods
Tree nuts were present in 14% of the products
Cow milk, wheat, soy and hydrolyzed soy were least found
Lotions, creams and baby oils were most likely to contain CAFs
No products contained egg or peanuts
These findings suggest that common pediatric skin care products should be suspected by parents as a source of exposure for their child's allergic reaction.

[b]New Chinese herbal medicine prevents anaphylaxis in peanut-allergic mice[/b]
A Chinese herbal medicine formula completely prevented anaphylaxis in peanut-allergic mice, according to a study presented at the 2004 AAAAI Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Kamal D. Srivastava, MS, and colleagues of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, gave an oral treatment of Chinese herbal medicine formula (FAHF-2) to peanut-allergic mice twice a day for seven weeks. The peanut-specific IgE was considerably reduced in the FAHF-2 treated mice compared to the control mice in early and later treatments. The FAHF-2 completely protected the mice from anaphylaxis. The treated mice had a higher body temperature and significantly lower plasma histamine than the control mice.

These studies were presented at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), taking place March 19-23, 2004 in San Francisco. The AAAAI is the largest professional medical specialty organization in the United States representing allergists, asthma specialists, clinical immunologists, allied health professionals and others with a special interest in the research and treatment of allergic disease. Established in 1943, the AAAAI has nearly 6,000 members in the United States, Canada and 60 other countries. The AAAAI serves as an advocate to the public by providing educational information through its Web site, [url="http://www.aaaai.org,"]www.aaaai.org,[/url] and its Physician Referral and Information Line, 1-800-822-2762.

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Editor's Notes:

These studies were presented as part of the 2004 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, but do not necessarily reflect the policies or the opinions of the AAAAI.
Copies of the abstracts presented at the AAAAI Annual Meeting are available on the AAAAI Web site at [url="http://www.aaaai.org/media/newsroom/am2004"]www.aaaai.org/media/newsroom/am2004[/url] (click on the link "JACI Abstract Supplement) or by calling John Gardner, Media Relations Manager at (414) 272-6071.

[This message has been edited by Nutternomore (edited March 22, 2004).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/22/2004 - 10:12am
Lovey's picture
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Joined: 03/22/2004 - 09:00

Regarding the study on the distribution of peanut allergen in the environment:
According to this information on the Peanut Residue Immunoassay Kit, Ara h 1 is a minor allergen and we should be more worried about the more stubborn Ara h 2, which doesn't seem to have be tested for in this study.
[url="http://www.safepath.com/catalog/item/189067/15615.htm"]http://www.safepath.com/catalog/item/189067/15615.htm[/url]
"The SafePath Peanut Residue assay is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that may be used to screen food products for the presence of peanut material caused by cross-contamination with peanut products and residues. This assay is a rapid and reliable test that significantly reduces the time required to screen food products for the presence of peanut residues. Background Peanuts are a major cause of food allergies both in children and in adults and can induce anaphylactic shock (1). In recent years, peanut allergens have been identified and characterized. The proteins Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 have been the focus of much attention(2). A 1998 study identified 6 major allergens, one of which was Ara h2, but found Ara h 1 was not a major peanut allergen (1). Burks et al also concluded that Ara h 2 is a major peanut allergen (3). Koppelman et al observed Ara h 2 to be 5.9

Posted on: Wed, 03/24/2004 - 3:38pm
Nutternomore's picture
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Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

Lovey,
Excellent point to ponder!
Wish I could see the full details of that study to see if I could gain more insight. In light of your information, it seem strange that the study focus was on that particular protein....
[This message has been edited by Nutternomore (edited March 25, 2004).]

Posted on: Wed, 03/24/2004 - 11:37pm
Shosh's picture
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Joined: 01/30/2004 - 09:00

the study on the chinese herbal treatments looks promising. I hope it is followed further and that its application is studied for its effects on humans. It would be wonderful to have a way for PA people to be able to avoid anaphylaxis.

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 12:37pm
DebO's picture
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Joined: 03/15/1999 - 09:00

[b]After cleaning hands with liquid soap, bar soap or commercial wipes, the peanut allergen was undetectable. However, plain water and antibacterial hand sanitizer left detectable peanut allergen on 3/10 hands.[/b]
I interpret this the negative way, rather than the positive. There is no sink in the actual classroom where my daughter eats. The children are not supervised after eating to ensure their hands are thoroughly washed. Considering that 3/10 will have detectable peanut allergens on their hands after eating, Thank God I have a peanut free classroom!!
As with many articles, it is all in the interpretation....
take care
deb

Posted on: Tue, 03/30/2004 - 9:41am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

oops
[This message has been edited by alex's mom1 (edited March 30, 2004).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/30/2004 - 10:35am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Peanut allergic mice?
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 03/30/2004 - 11:54pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

I hate to admit it - but I keep dwelling on those mice too. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img] Does someone actually go around testing lab animals for food allergies then ship them off to appropriate testing facilities? They don't somehow give those mice fa's do they? can they? Sorry.
************
Deb said "it is all in the interpretation...." And I agree with that. From the same quote, [b]After cleaning hands with liquid soap, bar soap or commercial wipes, the peanut allergen was undetectable. However, plain water and antibacterial hand sanitizer left detectable peanut allergen on 3/10 hands.[/b] You know what stuck out for me? People here at pa.com have always said water and the sanitizer's don't eliminate peanut protein. And commercial wipes seems a popular choice instead. Not just for hands - but table tops too, and public seats too.
But, referring to Deb's concern - I see an additional negative. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] When they say it left detectable peanut allergen on 3/10 hands - is that adults washing their hands, or kids? Unless it was just average kids - in a rush to go out and play - I'd say reality numbers would be even worse. (Just my opinion.)
Now, if we could just get those *experts* to listen to us - they'd be two steps forward. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 03/31/2004 - 12:10am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by AnnaMarie:
[b]
Deb said "it is all in the interpretation...." And I agree with that. From the same quote, [b]After cleaning hands with liquid soap, bar soap or commercial wipes, the peanut allergen was undetectable. However, plain water and antibacterial hand sanitizer left detectable peanut allergen on 3/10 hands.[/b]..............
................But, referring to Deb's concern - I see an additional negative. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] When they say it left detectable peanut allergen on 3/10 hands - is that adults washing their hands, or kids? Unless it was just average kids - in a rush to go out and play - I'd say reality numbers would be even worse. (Just my opinion.)
[/b]
Those 3/10 hands, is that 3 out of the 10 people who are actually eating/handling a food item with the specific peanut allergen? If it is all persons, [b]ir[/b]regardless of what they have eaten/handled directly and just acquiring off surfaces, then does/could this indicate anything similiar about public places?
Anyone?
Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just seeking clarification.

Posted on: Wed, 03/31/2004 - 12:49am
ACBaay's picture
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Joined: 03/19/2002 - 09:00

Yes, "food-allergic mice". Researchers at Harvard University developed a mouse that reacts to food allergens like humans. I guess they would need to order the extra-extra small size epi-belt.
[url="http://131.104.232.9/fsnet/2002/3-2002/fsnet_march_5.htm#RESEARCHERS"]http://131.104.232.9/fsnet/2002/3-2002/fsnet_march_5.htm#RESEARCHERS[/url] UNV
[This message has been edited by ACBaay (edited March 31, 2004).]

Posted on: Wed, 03/31/2004 - 12:55am
jtolpin's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Peanut allergic mice.....
When we had/have a mouse in the house, I use the standard traps (.50 cents each), and put soy nut butter on it (since we have no PB in the house)... Maybe I use PB.
Which would be worse -- snapping the mouse's neck from the trap or anaphylaxis of mouse...
I suppose, both situations yield the same result.
Where's the #1 Mouser when you need a Q like this answered.....
Jason

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