A Study of 32 Food-Induced Anaphylaxis Deaths in Ontario; 1986-2000

Posted on: Tue, 10/28/2003 - 12:30am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Another PA.com member asked me to post the link to this study, done by Anaphylaxis Canada re deaths in Ontario, Canada:-

[url="http://www.anaphylaxis.org/content/programs/programs_research_deaths.asp"]http://www.anaphylaxis.org/content/programs/programs_research_deaths.asp...

What was of interest to this fellow member is that a lot of deaths occurred because someone had to run 200 to 300 meters to get the Epi-pen, which would be a *good* argument when addressing schools about your PA child wearing their medication.

One thought that struck me about this though was if a death occurred because someone had to run 200 to 300 meters to get the Epi-pen, could it also not occur because someone had to run the same distance (or more) to get to the PA child who was wearing their Epi-pen? I'm not sure if that is equivalent or not.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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Posted on: Tue, 10/28/2003 - 4:26am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Very interesting article Cindy.
I copied this from the article:
[b] 2/6 people who died from ingestion of tree nut allergen knew that they were allergic to peanut but had not been tested for tree nuts.
[/b]
I wonder whether this would be cross-contamination, rather than an allergy to tree nuts. That possiblity doesn't seem to have been considered in the report.

Posted on: Tue, 10/28/2003 - 5:26am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]Another PA.com member asked me to post the link to this study, done by Anaphylaxis Canada re deaths in Ontario, Canada:-
[url="http://www.anaphylaxis.org/content/programs/programs_research_deaths.asp"]http://www.anaphylaxis.org/content/programs/programs_research_deaths.asp[/url]
What was of interest to this fellow member is that a lot of deaths occurred because someone had to run 200 to 300 meters to get the Epi-pen, which would be a *good* argument when addressing schools about your PA child wearing their medication.
One thought that struck me about this though was if a death occurred because someone had to run 200 to 300 meters to get the Epi-pen, could it also not occur because someone had to run the same distance (or more) to get to the PA child who was wearing their Epi-pen?
[/b]
Do you think a school could use this info as a reason to claim a child is at too much risk to attend school in a traditional institutional setting? ie: a school stating a child should be homeschooled/homebound?
Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Merely reflecting on my own *highly individual, highly unique, and completely personal past dealings with my *own* childs situation*.

Posted on: Tue, 10/28/2003 - 6:19am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Anna Marie, sounds like cross-contamination to me as well. On the other hand, if you're PA there is a fairly high percentage that you can develop TNA isn't there? I don't know. It would be nice if the article/study had been clearer.
Momma Bear, I'm not sure. Do schools anywhere have the *right* to deny anyone schooling based on a visible or hidden disability?
The answer to me about why children die because people are running for the Epi-pen would be a *good* case for children being able to wear their Epi-pen (which I believe they are in Ontario, or my experience has been rather that the school has INSISTED that my son, even at the age of 3-3/4 have his Epi-pen on his person). It would also stress the importance to the PA child of always wearing their Epi-pen. And I guess also about Epi-pens not being locked away in some medicine cabinet (or cabinet used for one) in schools.
Do schools anywhere have the *right* to deny a child education?
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 10/28/2003 - 10:52am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]
Do schools anywhere have the *right* to deny a child education?
[/b]
My apologies if you misunderstood my question.
What I was referring to was a "homebound" option. ie: not denying an education, but schooling not in a traditional institutional setting, provided through the public school. At least this is how I understand a "homebound" option in the U.S. [i]I may be wrong in my assumptions.[/i] Anyone?
It is my understanding that "homeschooling" is somewhat different that "homebound schooling". [i]Again, my assumptions could be wrong.[/i] Just seeking clarification.
Anyone?
PA aside, I have heard of circumstances where for whatever reason, a child's health status may prohibit attending school in an institutional traditional setting.

Posted on: Tue, 10/28/2003 - 11:40am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Cindy, I don't actually know of any studies on how many people have peanut vs. tree nut vs. both allergies. But peanut and tree nut are [i]at least[/i] two separate allergies. (I say [i]at least[/i] because I think walnut, pecan, brazil nut, etc., are each different allergies.)
MommaBear, I think I understand what you are saying. Homeschooled is taught (or arranged) by the parent/guardian. Homebound is taught and arranged by school/school board, but is done in the child's home.
As for your original question: could a school use this info as a reason to claim a child is at too much risk to attend school - personally I would say no. Too much risk means they first have to look at whether or not it is possible to make the environment safe. If no agreement can be reached - then maybe they could say the child should be homebound.
Disclaimer: This is just my own opinion. I am not a professional in either the field of education or law.

Posted on: Tue, 10/28/2003 - 11:52pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Momma Bear, sorry I misunderstood your question. Homebound schooling is something that I know absolutely nothing about. Nothing.
I know that in discussions with the school principal early this year he did say that as far as homeschooling children, they do not even have the resources now to provide school board personnel to come into your home say once a month to check to see that you're meeting curriculum whereas in the past they did.
But no, I don't know anything about homebound schooling at all. Is this something that is as common or more common than homeschooling?
Personally, and again, like Anna Marie, not being a professional or anything, I still can't see how any school board could deny a PA child entry into their school based on the information in this study.
Again, I really just think it means they should "get with the program" and allow children to carry their meds and make sure everyone is educated.
Does homebound schooling even exist in Canada?
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Wed, 10/29/2003 - 8:22am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Cindy, Homebound schooling does exist in Canada. When one of my kids was in Grade 4 there was a little girl who had been taught at home - by a licenced teacher - at the expense of the school board. She was just starting school for the first time that year.
She had a very severe health problem and everyone involved had felt primary grades were to dangerous for her, but, by grade 4 they felt the benefits outweighed the risks so they did enroll her in school (with a lot of preparation of the teacher, classmates, and a teacher's aid provided for the students safety).
Usually Homebound schooling is done for short term problems (e.g. children who have surgery and will miss a few months/terms of school). This girl that was in my son's class is the only one I [i]personally[/i] know of that was Homebound taught for such a long time (3 years), and if the parents had wanted they had the option of continuing for at least an additional 2 years.

Posted on: Wed, 10/29/2003 - 8:31am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

AnnaMarie,
Yes. That is what I was trying to inquire.
Cindy,
As for "getting with the program".....
[i]Time will tell?[/i]
Remembering the absolute refusal the school returned when asked if my son could carry his epi pen on him (with parent and physician approval).
An official at the private school my son attended stated (at one time) he would be able to carry the epi pen on his (my son) person in the successive school year (with parent and physician approval), but when push came to shove, [i]refused[/i] citing liability.
Wondering how public health regulations fit into this. As I have read many that mention certain personnel as key players.
Thinking of the "No Child Left Behind" act and the apparent lack of funds to fuel it.
A rock and a hard place?

Posted on: Wed, 10/29/2003 - 10:30am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Anna Marie, thank-you for telling idiot woman here that homebound schooling does exist in Canada. Do you ever say something that you feel completely idiotic for having said? But truth be told, I really didn't know if homebound schooling did exist in Canada or not and I've never been afraid to look stupid [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] so.....
I appreciate you telling me that it does. I'm wondering if it does in this school board district if they don't even have the funds to send a teacher out to check that curriculum is being met by children that are being homeschooled. Hmm.
I still really believe that the information in this study could be used to convince some school boards that our children should be allowed to carry/wear their meds. I don't have that problem myself because it was a requirement of Jesse's school, when he was 3-3/4 years of age for him to strap on an Epi-belt and it's been a requirement ever since (and one that I don't mind at all - I think it's great, he never goes anywhere without his Epi-belt and has done so since a young age).
But there are many members here who have to fight to be able to have their children be able to wear their meds and again, I really think this article could be used to their advantage.
And I think the other difference that we're probably experiencing, even in trying to communicate about this is that Canadians still seem behind/different as far as being the litigious and liability concerned nation that the United States is.
For example, in the U.S. I could have easily sued my former landlord for ruining my life (or that's the impression I get from watching my American drama shows). Here, in Canada, unless I have very specific documents, including psychiatric evaluations, etc. it would be a hard pressed case to even attempt to bring to court. I did consult my lawyer to see if I could sue the man and no I really can't in Canada.
Veered off topic, I know, but for a reason, I think.
Oh, just as 504 Plans are considered legal documents in the U.S. and written school plans are not considered legal documents in Canada, just guidelines. Stuff like that.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Wed, 10/29/2003 - 11:54am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Cindy, you didn't look like an idiot. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I only knew about it because of a personal experience, otherwise I would not have heard of it here either.
I think it [i]theoretically[/i] is available throughout Ontario. But proving it's necessary could be near impossible. (Kind of like MommaBear trying to prove her son needs his epi-pen immediately available at all times.)
I do agree with you, this report should help people prove how important it is - but if the school/board is not willing to listen with an open mind it (unfortunately) won't force them to see reason.
My son's school was also very insistent that he carry his own epi-pen. They didn't force the issue initially, but I think they would have if I didn't agree. I am extremely thankful that they were so insistent, and also thankful to people here for telling me about the epi-belt.

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