1+ and 2+ skin test reactions

Posted on: Thu, 06/06/2002 - 4:43am
NoNuts4Honey's picture
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Joined: 05/18/2002 - 09:00

pQuick question from this "food allergy newbie" for all you more experienced:/p
pMy son tested a 1+ for milk and tomatoes, and a 2+ for soybean. Does this mean that he is allergic to these things and that all products cotaining these should be avoided? He has never had any allergic symptoms from these items thus far, except that he has hayfever which I have always attributed to his other allergies (cat dander and dust). I know this probably is a really stupid question but thought I would throw it out there anyway. I have contacted the allergist and am waiting for a call back. It wasn't until I had done research on my daughters PA that made me double check my sons food allergies. I feel so guilty for not looking into this sooner. All these past exposures to these allergens has probably heightened his sensitivity- thank goodness there has been NO reactions as of today. I will be very interested in all the feedback. Please help me to understand food allergies. Is it fair to say that you are either allergic or not, whether or not the skin test is 1, 2, or 4, and those things should be avoided? Also, has anyone experienced anaphylaxis to an allergen which had been tested as a 1+ or 2+? Thank you for the input./p
pSeleste/p
pPS.. Sorry for the rambling, this is only my 2nd post....haven't quite got the knack of this yet./p

Posted on: Thu, 06/06/2002 - 6:01am
BENSMOM's picture
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Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

Hope you get a better answer than this, but as far as I know, lots of people don't strictly avoid foods that they are 1 or 2 on (unless it's nuts or shellfish maybe). Also, skin prick tests are notoriously inaccurate--high rate of false positives--so I would think if there's no reaction you can see, I wouldn't worry about it too much. I hope your allergist or someone else here can give you better information. Just noticed this was dropping pretty far down the list of topics.

Posted on: Thu, 06/06/2002 - 6:12am
Love my C's picture
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Joined: 04/03/2002 - 09:00

Welcome, Seleste!
I'm guessing your son had a skin prick test by the results you posted. I know it is possible to not be allergic to something and test positive that is why Dr.'s do food challenges, according to my son's doctor, the only way to know for sure (or previous reaction to ingestion). You may want to do some searches on this board regarding tests.
My 3 yr. old son tested a 2+ to soy this past January. He didn't tolerate soy formula as a baby, but had eaten foods containing soy without problems. However, just within the last couple of months he has now started to react to soy. So I want to totally eliminate it from his diet in the hopes that he will outgrow it.
I believe I have read here that people have experienced anaphlylaxsis with low test scores. Thankfully, we have not experienced anaphylaxsis with my son.
Hope others can be of more help to you!

Posted on: Thu, 06/06/2002 - 7:53am
river's picture
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Joined: 07/15/1999 - 09:00

When I first had my son tested for allergies, he came out as a 2 for a whole wack of things, (peanut was a 6). At first I tried to avoid everything, wheat, soy, etc. It wasn't easy. Then I took my son to see an allergist at Sick Kids, (Toronto). I wasn't too impressed with him but he did say that it wasn't worth avoiding the foods that came out as mild allergens. It seemed to make sense to me, so that is what I did, and there have been no problems, (that was 5 years ago.) I avoid peanuts and nuts like the plague, and have not given him any shellfish even though he came up a 2 for shrimp. Everything else, seems to be okay.

Posted on: Thu, 06/06/2002 - 7:56am
CVRTBB's picture
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Joined: 11/23/2001 - 09:00

Hello Seleste,
I have 2 PA children... my son tested at 4+ and my daughter is a 1. I asked the Allergist the exact question that you are asking and this is what he told me... He said not to worry about a 1 or 2, he said that they would not have a reaction to these as a rule. He did say for instance that my son who is a 2+ to chocolate could eat a chocolate bar for instance and not have any kind of reaction but if he sat and ate a whole bag of chocolate he could go into anaphalaxis. Peanuts/Nuts and Shellfish are another story though... these he said to strictly avoid even with a low score. In fact even though my daughter is only a 1 he still has me carry an Epi Pen Jr for her. I have decided to let the school keep hers in the school office (small private school with no nurse) but my son will continue to carry his in an Allergy Pack on his belt as he has been doing. Hope this helps some [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Valerie

Posted on: Thu, 06/06/2002 - 10:40am
momjd's picture
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Joined: 02/24/2002 - 09:00

My ds has the same reaction to his +1 allergens as he does his +4s. He gets eczema and a diaper rash. (Sometimes these types of symptoms aren't caused by IgE antibodies and don't show up on the RAST test- but ours did). He also gets diarrhea from some of his allergens, including milk which is a very low level 1. From my perspective, there are two factors to consider when deciding whether to continue to have these foods: 1) will it cause a reaction; 2) will it prevent the child from growing out of the allergy. Because my ds has pretty damaging reactions (messing up his GI tract resulting failure to gain weight), we avoid all of his allergens. I assume that this total avoidance is also necessary for him to grow out of them. Of course, since we have documented reactions we're not dealing with the possibility of false positives. If your child is truly reaction free from these foods, then your decision making process will be significantly different from mine. I guess I would ask the doc whether he means that your child isn't really allergic to these foods and thus doesn't need to avoid them to grow out of them or if he means that your child will grow out of them regardless...
As you can see from the other posts, each child and his or her reactions are so varied- it's really hard to decide what's best.

Posted on: Thu, 06/06/2002 - 11:49am
NoNuts4Honey's picture
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Joined: 05/18/2002 - 09:00

Thank you all so much for the feedback. This has really been a learning experience for me. Sometimes I feel like such a pain at the allergist because I come prepared with all my questions, our appointment is always over an hour long and I get home and have even more questions. This is why this board has been such a saving grace for me. Knowledge is power and I get so much from reading the experiences of others. Thank you so much again. I still haven't heard back from the allergist, but from the responses I have received here I am no longer beating myself up for exposing my son over and over again to milk, tomatoes and soy.
Stay Safe, Seleste

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