Nobel Prize winner leading research into bacteria-based food allergy treatment

researcher.jpg

Professor Barry Marshall won the Nobel Prize in 2005 for discovering that a specific type of bacteria was the root cause of ulcers, throwing out the earlier notion that it was stress causing the problem.

Now, Marshall is leading research into whether that bacteria can play a role in treating food allergies.

Bacteria may control immune responses

The bacterium, called Helicobacter pylori, might be capable of regulating and balancing immune responses in the gut, which may lead to a way to prevent eczema and other manifestations of food allergy in infants and possibly paving the way towards prevention of lifelong allergies in kind.

The Australian scientist and his team believe that the bacterium, which is considered healthy in regulated amounts, is underrepresented or nonexistent in many children due to the hyper-clean environments modern living has afforded. This could indicate that the microbes beneficial to immune system development may be less common in modern society, providing a root cause for pediatric allergies.

The first phase of the Marshall-led research program begins with healthy adults as a control for the dosage testing of the killed Helicobacter pylori. Children will be included in study at a later date. The study is funded by nearly $1 million in grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council and is being conducted at Perth's Telethon Institute for Child Research in Australia.

Peanut Free and Nut Free Directory

Peanut-Free/Nut-Free Directory

Our directory is intended as a resource for people with peanut and nut allergies. It contains foods, helpful products, and much more.

Close x

Sign up for our newsletter and receive a free peanut-free snack guide.

Stay on top of your allergy with recipes, lifestyle tips and more.

Email

PeanutAllergy.com Social

 

Poll

Where do you get your peanut allergy information?
The internet
33%
My allergist
33%
Friends or family
33%
Other
0%
Total votes: 3