Wipes vs handwashing

3 replies [Last post]
By Gwen 5 on Fri, 05-21-04, 01:00

Anyone researched if using wipes afetr eating is satisfactory ?? I know handwashing is the safest slution but is using wipes cutting the risk in a school that is not nut free??

__________________

Mom of dd age 10- allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and sesame

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By Munchkin's Mom on Fri, 05-21-04, 02:22

There has been a recent study that shows that wipes are not terribly effective at removing peanut residue or proteins. Good old fashioned handwashing with soap and water is preferable, especially in a school that's not nut free.

Edited because I found the article:

Soap Can Protect Those With Peanut Allergies

May 11, 2004 11:04:25 AM PDT , HealthDay

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDayNews) -- Good news if you're allergic to peanuts -- most soaps and household cleaners will remove enough allergen from hands and dining surfaces to prevent an attack.

However, dishwashing liquid and alcohol-based hand sanitizer left trace amounts of peanut allergen on hands and tables, says a study by Johns Hopkins Children's Center in the May issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Doctors found the failure of hand sanitizer most troubling, since many teachers find it more convenient to use the gel rather than sending children to the bathroom to wash up.

"Their use may not really remove the allergen, but just spread it around," pediatric allergist Dr. Robert A. Wood said in a prepared statement.

In the study, researchers applied a teaspoon of peanut butter to the hands of 19 allergy-free volunteers. Hand wipes, liquid soap, bar soap, plain water and a hand sanitizer were tested, with only the sanitizer failing to remove the allergen.

Researchers also compared the performance of plain water, dishwashing liquid, Formula 409 cleaner, Lysol sanitizing wipes and Target-brand household cleaner with bleach in removing peanut butter from a clean table. Only dishwashing liquid failed.

"It's possible that dish soap creates a film over eating surfaces, making it difficult to clean underneath," Wood said. "But our results suggest that even if a child licked the table vigorously after it had been cleaned with dish soap, he probably still couldn't get enough allergen to cause a reaction."

More information
The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network has more about food allergens

.

Lori

[This message has been edited by Munchkin's Mom (edited May 20, 2004).]

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By Driving Me Nutty on Fri, 05-21-04, 03:53

And here's a link to the recent thread on that article - [url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000758.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum8/HTML/000758.html[/url]

__________________

~ Mom to 3 y/o dd (PA>100 CAP RAST and TNA level 3) ~

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By Kim M on Fri, 05-21-04, 15:51

Quote:There has been a recent study that shows that wipes are not terribly effective at removing peanut residue or proteins. Good old fashioned handwashing with soap and water is preferable, especially in a school that's not nut free.

I think this may be misleading, since the articly says that wipes and handwashing were both effective at removing peanut residue. In terms of hands, it says that only the hand sanitizer was NOT effective, and for cleaning tables, it said that only dishwashing liquid was NOT effective. So hand wipes would seem to be as effective as washing with soap and water, at least according to this study.

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