TBHQ - do you know what this this?

5 replies [Last post]
By AmyR on Fri, 12-01-00, 18:38

Does anyone know what TBHQ is? I took my son to Friendlys Restaurants the other day. I had a waitress that was pretty clueless about allergies. I asked if the grilled cheese and french fries had any peanut or peanut product in them. She responded, "To the best of my knowledge, I don't believe so." I told her I needed to know for sure. She came back and said they use vegetable oil to which I asked what kind of vegetable oil. She came back again and told me the ingredients were soybean oil and TBHQ. Anyone know what this ingredient is? My son had very rosey cheeks that afternoon with a small rash.

I did a search on this board but only saw this ingredient mentioned one other time with no discussion about it.

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By arachide on Fri, 12-01-00, 18:58

TBHQ = tertiary butyl hydroquinone

It's an antioxidant used in the preservation of food oils. Apparently it's in a lot of stuff even chewing gum. There's a lot on the net about it. Looks like a controversial additive (aren't they all?). One eye-catching article was about TBHQ causing contact dermatitis.

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By Kathryn on Fri, 12-01-00, 19:04

Hi, I am at work so could easily look this one up for you. According to Ruth Winter's "A Consumer's Diectionary of Food Additives" this is the short form for tertiary butylhydroquinone. She says that it is an antioxidant that contains petroleum derived butane. The FDA says TBHQ cannot exceed 0.02 percent of its oil and fat content. Ingestion of a single gram (a 30th of an ounce) has caused nausea, vomiting, ringing in the ears, delirium, a sense of suffocation and collapse. Application to the skin may cause allergic reactions.

Now, usually when I look up additives for people on this board they do not sound that bad but this one sounds awful, doesn't it. I don't think its peanut related but I think I'll try to avoid it anyway.

Well, that's all for now from your friendly librarian, Kathryn.

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By e-mom on Sat, 12-02-00, 01:41

AmyR--We haven't been to a Friendly's in months but my son used to eat their grilled cheese sandwiches with no problem. We wouldn't let him eat the french fries (not because of the oil they cooked them in but because we felt they were not that good for him to eat at that time) instead we would ask them to serve a vegetable(s) instead which they had no problem doing. In fact, now when we go to restaurants we always ask that they give him veggies instead of fries.

[This message has been edited by e-mom (edited December 01, 2000).]

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By Lorrie on Sat, 06-15-13, 14:22

Please go through your cabinet and get rid of anything with TBHC in it. It is a preservative derived from BUTANE! It is even being sprayed on salads in restaurants. It causes swelling, nausea,
dillirium, collapse, tinnitis (ringing in the ears) vomiting, hyperactivity,asthma/attacks, rhinitis, dermatitis, restlessness in kids,in higher doses has caused cancerous legions in rats and even DNA changes and may lead to low estrogen in females. It is used in Skin and Baby care products, pet food, paint, lacquer thinner, resins, carckers, crisps, fast food. Restaurants even spray their salads with it!

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By Craftygirl1958 on Wed, 07-03-13, 03:09

Lori, How did you find out this info? My daughter was recently diagnosed with peanut and milk allergies where she needs to carry benadryl and an Epi-Pen. We were out to eat at a diner and were assured that the steak she received had NO butter or milk products on it. She also had a salad. Her upper lip swelled and became numb. We spoke to someone who said that they may not cook the steak with butter but paint it on after. Now I'm wondering if it was the salad with TBHQ on it instead.

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