Login | Register

Should a school really BAN peanuts/tree nuts all together?

113 replies [Last post]
By turlisa on Sun, 08-29-04, 19:49

I am new to this and I dont want to sound like I am not a compassionate person. I am the mother of a 5 yr old little girl who is starting school this year. She is a very picky eater and does not eat meat at all. The majority of her protein comes from peanut butter and peanut containing products. I just received a letter from her school yesterday that ALL peanut/nut products are BANNED from school along with fresh pitted fruits, seeds (poppy, sesame & sunflower) and legumes. The reason for the ban is that one 1st grade boy has a life threatening allergy to peanuts. Although I feel bad for the little boy, and cant imagine what his mother must be going thru agonizing about the safety of her child everyday, I can help but feel that this ban is unjust for the 99.9% of the student body that is not allergic. Knowing that there is someone at this school that has PA, naturally, I would restrict the amount of these foods I would send to school with her, but I was not given that choice. I was told I must comply. I am fighting the school board and I will continue fighting til this ban is removed.

The boy in question attended the school last year without incident. they did take precautions last year with a peanut free zone and a peanut free hot lunch program. The reason the ban is in place this year is because he was afraid of the residue that was in the garbage and he was afraid to make friends because they all ate peanut butter; and while I agree that is very sad, I dont believe it is a viable reason to ennforce the ban.

My neice has a life threatening allergy to eggs. not even a year old yet my sister carries an epipen with her in case her daughter comes in contact with egg. Now it would be IMPOSSIBLE to ban everything containing egg from the school, but seeing that the school has banned all peanut/nut from the school, wouldnt they be legally responsible to ban all egg also? at what point do they decide one persons life is more valuable than the other?

Whats more, in either case, what makes the childrens parents feel they have the right to take away the foods that many children can tollerate.

Now many will cite the disability act, but if one child is in a wheelchair you put in a ramp, you dont take out the stairs. One child is allergic to bees, you dont keep everyone in at recess.

Where does it stop? I really do understand the severity of the allergy, I just dont feel it is right to deprive the other students of a food they love that is also healthy for the majority.

Please enlighten me and tell me if I am wrong.

Thank you

Lisa T

Groups: None
By on Sun, 08-29-04, 20:20

No comment.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Groups: None
By JacquelineL-B on Sun, 08-29-04, 20:57

I'm so sorry to hear that your neice has egg allergies. My DS reacts to eggs too, we can no longer cook them in our home since he has airborne reactions.

So actually you've been exposed to food allergies for a year now with your neice having a life-threatening egg allergy.

Something to consider:
At family parties do you serve egg dishes? Or do you, out of compassion for your neice, not have something that could kill her? If your daughter would only eat egg products would you tell her that her desire for a certain food outweighs the life of her cousin?

It has been a very painful experience in my life when family has put their desire for a certain food *right now* over the life of my son.

Perhaps because of that I try to accomodate all disabilities out of compassion because everyone is a member of my community. I trust the disabled and their families, doctors and teachers to decide what their accomodation needs are. Everyone deserves a compassionate family and community!

In my humble opinion,
Jacqueline

Groups: None
By krasota on Sun, 08-29-04, 21:23

personally, I feel that your daughter has a right to eat foods which are safe and appetizing for her. However, peanut residue is very hard to neutralize. I think that the ban on all seeds and legumes is over the top--and I have a contact (anaphylactic) allergy to soy.

Is the PA child contact-allergic to sunflower seeds? If not, perhaps your daughter could use Sunbutter, with special permission from the principal? It's free of peanut-traces. Perhaps the school would see fit to make the soy-free version of sunbutter permissible?

I'm vegetarian and manage to be peanut and soy-free, but I'd be quite miffed if sunflower seeds or peas weren't an option--your daughter has dietary needs, too, and she needs a viable protein source to make it through the day. Without legumes, seeds, or nuts, what can you give her--quinoa? I imagine she wouldn't like that too much.

I really think you need to contact the school. Don't push for peanut butter, I really don't think that's negotiable, but finding a peanut-free spread should be a negotiable option.

It's possible that your child might have to sit at a different table. It's far easier to decontaminate *one* lunch table and one child's hands than all the tables and everyone's hands. [img]/peanut/boards/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif[/img] I wish there were a good workaround for allergies, but there just aren't always.

ygg

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 21:47

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b] The reason for the ban is that one 1st grade boy has a life threatening allergy to peanuts. Although I feel bad for the little boy, and cant imagine what his mother must be going thru agonizing about the safety of her child everyday, I can help but feel that this ban is unjust for the 99.9% of the student body that is not allergic. [/b]

99.9? [i]Really?[/i] Source for the statistic?

Groups: None
By Cade'smom on Sun, 08-29-04, 22:19

turlisa - you truly cannot understand this allergy until you live it every day AND NIGHT of your life. Believe me, night time is the worse for me as I lay in bed wondering if tomorrow's going to be the dreaded day.

What is protein for your daughter is poison to our children. If your daughter goes without peanut products for 5 out of the 21 meals that she eats a week, she will not die. She could possibly become interested in other foods if PB is not an option for her. If my son accidentally comes in contact with peanut products he could die.

I think I could go on and on but sometimes I get tired of having to defend myself to others on why it's so important to keep my son alive. And I'm tired now.

------------------
Lynee', mom to:
Cade - PA, egg whites, seasonal
Carson - NKFA, seasonal

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 22:19

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b]I am new to this and I dont want to sound like I am not a compassionate person. I am the mother of a 5 yr old little girl who is starting school this year. She is a very picky eater and does not eat meat at all. The majority of her protein comes from peanut butter and peanut containing products. I just received a letter from her school yesterday that ALL peanut/nut products are BANNED from school along with fresh pitted fruits, seeds (poppy, sesame & sunflower) and legumes. The reason for the ban is that one 1st grade boy has a life threatening allergy to peanuts. Although I feel bad for the little boy, and cant imagine what his mother must be going thru agonizing about the safety of her child everyday, I can help but feel that this ban is unjust for the 99.9% of the student body that is not allergic. Knowing that there is someone at this school that has PA, naturally, I would restrict the amount of these foods I would send to school with her, but I was not given that choice. I was told I must comply. I am fighting the school board and I will continue fighting til this ban is removed.

The boy in question attended the school last year without incident. they did take precautions last year with a peanut free zone and a peanut free hot lunch program. The reason the ban is in place this year is because he was afraid of the residue that was in the garbage and he was afraid to make friends because they all ate peanut butter; and while I agree that is very sad, I dont believe it is a viable reason to ennforce the ban.

My neice has a life threatening allergy to eggs. not even a year old yet my sister carries an epipen with her in case her daughter comes in contact with egg. Now it would be IMPOSSIBLE to ban everything containing egg from the school, but seeing that the school has banned all peanut/nut from the school, wouldnt they be legally responsible to ban all egg also? at what point do they decide one persons life is more valuable than the other?

Whats more, in either case, what makes the childrens parents feel they have the right to take away the foods that many children can tollerate.

Now many will cite the disability act, but if one child is in a wheelchair you put in a ramp, you dont take out the stairs. One child is allergic to bees, you dont keep everyone in at recess.

Where does it stop? I really do understand the severity of the allergy, I just dont feel it is right to deprive the other students of a food they love that is also healthy for the majority.

Please enlighten me and tell me if I am wrong.

Thank you

Lisa T[/b]

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm. The school reps I met with over a week ago decided to institute a "peanut/nut free classroom" without me even asking for it. Within two days of that decision, they changed their minds. (something about no "guarantees" and a child who "only ate peanutbutter".) I did not authorize a change to the plan. I thought, "why does this child have to eat it in the classroom?" Surely there must be a point of compromise?

Anywhooooooooooo, it's written into a "plan" (the classroom restrictions), and so far, to my knowledge, it has been voluntarily violated at least once. My cubs physician letter states the need for such a zone of minimal risk.

I mean, a rep at the school informed me (in writing) that my just 9 year old, special needs son should be able to "police himself" wrt certain dangers at school.

[b]SARCASM WARNING[/b]: [i]I mean, why have crossing guards? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img][/i]

Just as a note: I have also been informed that there can be no guarantees wrt the "hot lunch" program offered by the school and my son will need to bring his own lunch. Should I cite Title II of the ADA, or just go with the program?

I also have been told my attendance on field trips will be mandatory in order for him to attend. (Remember, I'm a licensed RN and there are expectations that go hand in hand with that, even in public places.) I always intended to go with on field trips or he would not go, but just noting.

I was informed I would not be allowed to be present at holiday/educational parties his class may hold, even when food is present.

I mean, I'm not just asking for accommodations, but also making, or trying to make, them myself, in order that my child be able to attend.

Question I ask myself: "Are my cubs needs being given the same priority (at least) as others? Is there an intentional effort (by whomever) to thwart actions that may afford him the same level of safety as others while at school? Is what [i]is achievable[/i] even being done?"

There is a special education board of appeals you might find interesting to read related to the same ("Mystic Valley"). I could reraise it for you on the boards.

Anywhoooooooooooooo, again.............. My son is in a very specialized public education program for 3rd graders (not for his peanut allergy, for other needs). I guess I could request a "homebound" option (for a number of reasons) and have the program brought to my family, at our doorstep. I mean, there are literally dozens of specialists involved in it. What ya think? (This comming from someone who homeschooled for over a year and a half.)

I'm in the middle of a lupus flare due to the predicament I find myself in. It must be wonderful not have deal with such worries in addition to the ususal where children and school are concerned..........

We meet with the school [i]again[/i] tomorrow (13 individuals total invited). Wish me the best, ok?

ps........ [i]rationalizing[/i], gotta love it.

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just relaying my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation.

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited August 29, 2004).]

Groups: None
By Munchkin's Mom on Sun, 08-29-04, 22:45

Please, just think about the message you are sending to your daughter, intentionally or otherwise. In essence, what you are saying to her is this...

Gee, it's too bad that little boy could die if he has a reaction to peanut residue, because YOU like peanut butter and it's far more important for YOU to have a food YOU like at school than it is to worry about his safety. YOUR desires are far more important than his needs. AFter all, YOU could skip peanut butter for one meal out of the three YOU eat each day, but I would never ask YOU to go without anything. If YOU like something, YOU had better believe I'll make sure YOU have it, even if another child is harmed in the process.

Your daughter likes peanut butter, and it's worth risking the life and safety of a classmate to make sure she doesn't have to go seven hours five days a week without it. Is this really the message you want to send to your child?

Please think about it.

Groups: None
By turlisa on Sun, 08-29-04, 22:56

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
99.9? [i]Really?[/i] Source for the statistic?[/b]

Well, we are a small community and he is the only one in school with a peanut/nut allergy, what percentage would you use?

Groups: None
By Sandra Y on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:03

Lisa,
The PA child's parents are not depriving other kids of peanut butter. The parents didn't make the rule. The school made the rule, most likely after consulting with the child's doctor.

If you don't like the rule, I'd suggest you set up a meeting with the principal. Complaining about it here won't do much good.

My daughter is underweight and she loves peanut butter. Unfortunately, we can no longer have it in the house since my son is severely allergic and has experienced a life-threatening reaction.

Fortunately, your daughter can have peanut butter for breakfast and dinner, so I think she'll be able to get plenty of peanuts in her diet. Lucky you!

This might be a great opportunity to introduce her to other foods. After all, it's not good for your child to limit herself to one food. She needs a more balanced diet. This just might be the nudge she needs to broaden her horizons.

Good luck.

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:11

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b]I am new to this and I dont want to sound like I am not a compassionate person. I am the mother of a 5 yr old little girl who is starting school this year. She is a very picky eater and does not eat meat at all.

[/b]

Oh. the horror. (You'll have to excuse my dark side. I've been told it just part of who I am. You know, the way some people just love peanuts/can't [i]live[/i] without certain items.) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Hey, but I completely understand such issues. I am the mother of not one, but [b]two[/b] special needs children (no complaints, very blessed, devil that you know thing), who have food [i]issues[/i]. [b]I'm a pretty particular/detail oriented gal myself and it is not limited to just food. [/b] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

anywhoooooooo, I'm not expecting persons to give up peanut butter or perform miracles. I mean, even tho I have. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

I'm just asking them not to eat it in a particular location. "Holy ground/zone of minimal risk" so to speak. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

See, my two very particular, perservarative, detail oriented children, have issues regarding food that could never be done justice by labelling such food concerns [i]a preference[/i] or mere food aversion. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] However, despite numerous concerns with texture, taste, scent, [b]presence[/b]..............I have managed to raise two strapping hulks, or so I have been told for their ages.

Maybe it's just me. Maybe it's a miracle.

(*Personally* I consider my youngest and lovingly ~[b]the runt[/b]~. He is 4 years old and verging on 50 lbs. (Still not weighing as much as his older brother did at one year of age. (It was somewhere past 50 lbs.)

to quote:

[b]"The majority of her protein comes from peanut butter and peanut containing products".[/b]

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm. For both my "picky eaters", (and you may not believe what and how much they can be "picky" about) peanut products were not an option. They are both allergic. Go Figure.

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just relaying my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation.

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited August 29, 2004).]

Groups: None
By turlisa on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:23

Quote:Originally posted by Munchkin's Mom:
[b]Please, just think about the message you are sending to your daughter, intentionally or otherwise. In essence, what you are saying to her is this...

Gee, it's too bad that little boy could die if he has a reaction to peanut residue, because YOU like peanut butter and it's far more important for YOU to have a food YOU like at school than it is to worry about his safety. YOUR desires are far more important than his needs. AFter all, YOU could skip peanut butter for one meal out of the three YOU eat each day, but I would never ask YOU to go without anything. If YOU like something, YOU had better believe I'll make sure YOU have it, even if another child is harmed in the process.

Your daughter likes peanut butter, and it's worth risking the life and safety of a classmate to make sure she doesn't have to go seven hours five days a week without it. Is this really the message you want to send to your child?

Please think about it.

[/b]

I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." and a secondary message is "stand up for what you believe in".

As for all the times at home she can eat peanut butter.. when? I cant give her peanut butter on toast for breakfast, her breath might send the allergic child into shock. what am I supposed to do, make peanut butter dinners?

You all are right, fortunately I have not had to deal with living day in and day out wondering if my child is going to die that day, but lets be reasonable here. do any of you really believe that the school will be COMPLETELY nut free?

The letter from the school stated that there would be a special area set aside for those students who were not sure if they had cross contaminated items in their lunch so that they can isolate the area. If that is the case, whats the harm in having that area set aside for those who do bring it.

Second, if the PA child believes his school is a safe area wont he then think that it is ok to let his guard down a little? and what would that do but put him in more danger. The teachers would be more complacent and may not react to the early signs of shock.. after all, it is a safe area, and I would think delaying emergency treatment would make the situation worse.

No, you say... the child wouldnt think he could let his guard down. He would be just as careful as if the school didnt have a ban? then isnt the ban really just selfishness on your part?

And lastly you all are missing my point. As a mother, your first reaction is to protect a child. I dont want any harm to come to him, however to ask me to read every lable as if it were my child with the allergy and make sure I do not send any cross contaminated items to school is not fair to me or any of the other parents. My children are my responsibility, your children are NOT.

Will the mother of a diabetic child want the whole student body to go without sugar?
My neice with the life threatening allergy to egg, will the school ban all product containing eggs? at what point will the school have to say that it can no longer offer lunch because there are too many allergic children?

I know you all think I am just being inconsiderate, and thats fine, you all are thinking about the hell you and your child have had to live through. But I am not the inconsiderate one here.

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:28

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b] Well, we are a small community and he is the only one in school with a peanut/nut allergy, what percentage would you use?

[/b]

You know this for a fact? FERPA laws would prohibit a school from divulging the allergy status of other children without express consent of the guardians and then only with caution and only information of a certain nature.

Do you know what the incidence of Food Allergy in the general population is? Are you saying that for whatever reason your school is an exception to that statistic? [i]Do tell,[/i] since maybe whatever statistical anomoly is occurring should be investigated.........

I mean, you even mentioned your niece having a food allergy:

[b]:"My neice has a life threatening allergy to eggs. not even a year old yet my sister carries an epipen with her in case her daughter comes in contact with egg."[/b]

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:31

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b] I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." and a secondary message is "stand up for what you believe in".

[/b]

[i]golf clap.............[/i]

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:35

I mean, as far as being "considerate/inconsiderate", and not intended as advice or recommendation, but only as a hypothetical question regarding a hypothetical outcome...............

........what would happen to the school system if every child with a life threatening food allergy was given a "homebound" option?

Anyone?

ps.......turlisa: was wondering if you had any comment on my second post...........

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:37

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b] My children are my responsibility, your children are NOT.
[/b]

exactly why I could possibly be swayed to the "ban" camp. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

[b]LOL![/b]

Groups: None
By smartalyk on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:41

Dear Lisa,

My son has life threatening allergies to egg AND peanuts/nuts. The school he attends has asked for NO peanut or nut products to come into the school (as per my request and that of another PA parent). I have NOT requested a ban on egg products (egg salad, mayonnaise, etc). Here's why: peanut residue can live on a surface for up to six months if it is not disinfected properly. One hundred students in a school, perhaps sixty eat peanut butter for lunch, perhaps twenty-five don't wash their hands afterwards. That's twenty-five doorknobs with peanut butter residue at a minimum, what about library books, water fountain, desks, etc. How many contaminated objects in a day? That residue can KILL my son, it has nothing to do with him being afraid to make friends with peanut butter lovers.

Eggs seem to be different in that the residue has not been an issue. My son would have to actually eat an egg product for him to have a reaction. In fact, we do keep egg products in our house for our other boys. We just ensure proper cleaning and disinfecting afterwards. But our house is a peanut and nut free zone. We have the same precautions at school for egg... my son's class does wash after eating both snack and lunch to keep him safe, in case they had egg products. The desks are also sanitized twice a day.

I hope this helps you understand the difference.

Also, taken from [url="http://www.allergic-reactions.com/home/causes_food.html"]http://www.allergic-reactions.com/home/causes_food.html[/url] : For some people with food allergies, just a taste or even a touch of the foods to which they are allergic can result in any of these symptoms and can set off a chain reaction that takes only minutes to culminate in full-blown anaphylaxis: swelling of the airways, loss of blood pressure, loss of consciousness, shock, and even death.12 This can happen with their first known exposure to a food. There have even been rare cases documented in which inhalation exposure to a food has triggered an anaphylactic reaction.13 The more rapidly symptoms present themselves; the more likely the reaction is to be severe.13

Groups: None
By smartalyk on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:51

Another point I would like to make. You asked if we really believe that the school will be free from nuts. Our school does not ALLOW peanuts or nuts and yet we do not say we are peanut or nut FREE. I know that there are parents that will not comply, either because they are ticked off or because they do not understand labelling or whatever. That is why the staff are all trained to use the Epi-Pen. There are posters in each of ds's classrooms with his picture and the protocol in an emergency (Epi-Pen 9-1-1 etc). That is why there are pictures on the door of the school reminding other students to get an adult if they see him having trouble breathing.

However, any risk that we can avoid... we will. This is life and death here. I am sorry that it inconveniences you. Heck, it even inconveniences me but I am stuck with it. Why should it be your problem? It isn't. But thank God the school realizes that it IS their problem to protect this allergic child.

I sure hope you decide that this one child's life is worth it to comply. Isn't it? I would do it for another child. But I have watched my son near death three (or is it four or five?) times now. I wouldn't wish that on anyone.

Groups: None
By smartalyk on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:59

[b][i] I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." and a secondary message is "stand up for what you believe in".[/b][/i]

Ummmmmm, apples to oranges here...

The needs of one child (TO STAY ALIVE) does outweigh the needs of many (TO EAT PROTEIN).

Are those really comparable?

Btw, did you know that cheese has protein? So does yogourt. There really are other options here. I hope your school provides you a list of alternates to the common peanut butter sandwich. You might realize that you really do have choices for your daughter. And has the school requested that your daughter not have peanut butter for breakfast? Here at our school they recommend that IF your child has peanut products for breakfast... eat before you get your school clothes on, then brush your teeth, wash up and get dressed. Should be fine.

I hope you reconsider fighting the school. And I hope they stick to their guns on this one... would you allow your daughter to take a loaded gun to school? That is essentially what peanut products are for our children. We didn't ask for this...

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Sun, 08-29-04, 23:59

Doing the math? Looking up the stats?

Groups: None
By on Mon, 08-30-04, 00:47

Cade's Mom, you posted:-

I think I could go on and on but sometimes I get tired of having to defend myself to others on why it's so important to keep my son alive. And I'm tired now.

That's why I posted "no comment". I figure I have people to educate this week in *real* life for my son to start school safely next Tuesday, and I just don't feel like going over it again here on the board.

I simply don't have the energy right now. I can feel it waning almost minute by minute right now and I need it for this week and next.

You said things very well, as have others.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 01:05

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b] As for all the times at home she can eat peanut butter.. when? I cant give her peanut butter on toast for breakfast, her breath might send the allergic child into shock.

[/b]

and let me get this straight..........[i]you think it is a better idea to send it directly to school to be consumed?[/i]

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 01:13

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b]Please enlighten me and tell me if I am wrong.

[/b]

[b]TADAAAAAA!!![/b]

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 01:17

Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]Cade's Mom, you posted:-

I think I could go on and on but sometimes I get tired of having to defend myself to others on why it's so important to keep my son alive. And I'm tired now.

That's why I posted "no comment". I figure I have people to educate this week in *real* life for my son to start school safely next Tuesday, and I just don't feel like going over it again here on the board.

I simply don't have the energy right now. I can feel it waning almost minute by minute right now and I need it for this week and next.

You said things very well, as have others.

[/b]

{{{}}}, Cindy..........

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 01:34

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b] I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." [/b]

are you referring to "mob rule"?

we live in a [i]republic[/i], right?

Groups: None
By Going Nuts on Mon, 08-30-04, 01:36

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b]
I dont want any harm to come to him, however to ask me to read every lable as if it were my child with the allergy and make sure I do not send any cross contaminated items to school is not fair to me or any of the other parents.
[/b]

Well, here's something we can agree on. Since we parents of PA kids have enough trouble deciphering labels and keeping current on which companies label properly, I would certainly never expect anyone else to have to do it.

There have been many, many debates on this topic on this board, and I have no desire to repeat my position on it. However, I would urge you to consider this: Many of our kids are not only PA, but MFA (multiple food allergic). They have to deal with this three meals a day, not just one. Somehow, we manage to keep them well nourished in spite of these limitations, some of which are unbelievably restrictive.

BTW, there is no global ban in my son's school - I [b]personally[/b] never felt the need for one. But each case is different, and there are many, many cases where a ban is warranted.

Amy

Groups: None
By Going Nuts on Mon, 08-30-04, 01:44

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b]
My children are my responsibility, your children are NOT.[/b]

Hmmm... Didn't I once hear that it takes a village to raise a child?

Groups: None
By California Mom on Mon, 08-30-04, 02:22

Thank you MommaBear!

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 02:43

Quote:Originally posted by California Mom:
[b]Thank you MommaBear!

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam[/b]

You know what they say about hills and battles.

[i]I'm setting up camp.[/i]

Groups: None
By NutlessMOM on Mon, 08-30-04, 02:52

I never asked for my children's school to be Peanut-Free. I simply wanted a Peanut-Free zone in the cafeteria and a ban on food being consumed in any other place other than the cafeteria. I have two children that are allergic to PA & soy. My youngest has had an anaphylactic reaction to PA just from touch (cross contamination). I think all allergies should be considered each individually. For instance, if a child is allergic to strawberries, do not have them in the room with the child. Same goes for chocolate or anything else that a child may DIE from. I was ignorant about allergies until my own children had allergies but what really opens your eyes is when your precious child almost DIES because of an allergy. I view the world a lot differently now because of their allergies and I think, I am a better person because of it. I am not a person who forces my views upon another but I think a life of a person is more important than just how I feel about something.

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Groups: None
By meadow on Mon, 08-30-04, 02:54

turlisa,

It's truly a shame that you are missing the importance of the ban. It is to protect a human life, and is a human life not worth skipping a peanut butter sandwich?

If it were your daughter, I'm sure you'd be very grateful that the school officials were doing everything they could to keep her safe.

It's very disappointing to see that you're not more compassionate. Nobody is depriving the other children of the foods they love, they are simply asked not to eat peanut products at school. That's five out of the 21 main means, not to mention snacks. Is this little boys life not worth this to you?

I hope you'll put yourself in that little boys shoes, or his parents shoes and rethink your position.

meadow

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:00

Quote:Originally posted by turlisa:
[b] what am I supposed to do, make peanut butter dinners?

[/b]

I could run with this.

[i]I think I will.[/i]

************************
[b]Sarcasm warning.........[/b]
************************

I mean, if people consider it is worth risking another child's life in order to have it consumed it at school, I don't see why people wouldn't desire it for dinner in their own home as well.......

Ya know, aside from consuming peanut butter at school (or just in a classroom) being a P!$$!^& contest.

I mean, I still don't see why someone *has* to consume it in my son's [b]classroom[/b] for snack when they are not prohibited from bringing it for lunch (not in the classroom). [i] Maybe snack shouldn't be in his classroom. Maybe freeking food shouldn't be there either. But ya know, I've tried to be accommodating in celebrations, birthday's, and the workload on the staff.

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just relaying my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation.

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:04

Quote:Originally posted by NutlessMOM:
[b]I never asked for my children's school to be Peanut-Free. I simply wanted a Peanut-Free zone in the cafeteria and a ban on food being consumed in any other place other than the cafeteria. [/b]

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. A ban on food being consumed anywhere except the cafeteria! You mean [i]only eating food in areas designed and maintained for such[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

[b]Forest.........Trees[/b] Novel idea, by the way....................... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:06

NutlessMOM,

by the way......did you get your request?

Or did people have *issues* with it. (People being the way they can be.)

Groups: None
By Mary Kay on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:07

Turlisa,

First let me say, I am in the minority on this board but I agree with you. My son is anaphylactic to peanuts. I have watched him in the ER near death. He just had an immunocap test done after 7 years without an exposure and he is still off the charts. Plus he has asthma. So yes, he is highly allergic to peanuts. But he is almost 13 years old and has attended preschool and public school since he was 3. There has never been a ban at any of the schools he has attended. He sat at a peanut free table through 3rd grade and then chose to sit at the end of a table and move seats if he was uncomfortable. We have never asked the schools to ban peanuts because my son has to learn to live in the world as it is. I cannot and do not expect the world to change to accommodate his allergy. He is learning the techniques he needs in order to live a safe life without Mommy and Daddy creating a safe little bubble for him to live in. I do understand what it is like to have a child with an allergy that can kill him at any ingestion. But I also know that there are no known statistics for anyone having an anaphylactic reaction from just smelling a pb odor or someone

Groups: None
By ALLERGYMOM on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:24

Ok first of all I usually dont get into these "debates" if thats what you want to call them and this may seem harsh but what the heck! I am so tired of people thinking we are out to get them and there PEANUTBUTTER! My son also has an egg, fish, shellfish, and tree nut allergy just as severe as the peanut allergy and guess what....Yes his class WILL BE EGG, PEANUT, TREE NUT, FISH, and SHELLFISH FREE. Am I selfish maybe but no more than you are in thinking your pb sandwich is more important than my childs life.

You may ask how can you not have eggs? Well he is allergic to uncooked eggs or stuff like mayo. So yes that means No Mayo.

Whats really sad is that my son and my family will spend the rest of our lives fighting people like this and belive me WE WILL FIGHT ALSO!

------------------
Have A Great Day

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:31

Quote:Originally posted by Mary Kay:
[b] We have never asked the schools to ban peanuts because my son has to learn to live in the world as it is. I cannot and do not expect the world to change to accommodate his allergy. He is learning the techniques he needs in order to live a safe life without Mommy and Daddy creating a safe little bubble for him to live in.I do understand what it is like to have a child with an allergy that can kill him at any ingestion.
[/b]

I'll create any bubbles my children *need*. And there are plenty of reputable sources and documentation to support them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] And I won't be the least bit squeamish about it. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [i]It's in my job description.[/i] You would probably stand back aghast of the bubbles my parents created for me........... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I've seen plenty of what happens to children (and adults) when left to their own accord/without safety nets/without caution/or just $#!^ happening.

[i]Plenty[/i]. I mean, it's a hazzard of my *other* job description.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but you've posted in another thread

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/001477.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/001477.html[/url]

that you are

[i]"on a state advisory council for the education of children with disabilities."[/i]

In IL, *my* state? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

Tell me, are there any openings for nurses on that council? You know, ones with special needs children? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Groups: None
By ALLERGYMOM on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:34

Hi MB [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------
Have A Great Day

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:34

Quote:Originally posted by Mary Kay:
[b]I would like to see your letter to the editor Turlisa. There was one from an adult with a peanut allergy that I totally agreed with also.

[/b]

would you like to see one *I would write*? You know, since you state you are on a council that concerns children such as my own.................

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:35

Quote:Originally posted by ALLERGYMOM:
[b]Hi MB [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[/b]

(waving wildly!!!!!)

Groups: None
By ALLERGYMOM on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:39

Waving back at ya [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I would like to see your letter.

------------------
Have A Great Day

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:43

Thinking of all the children and adults I've seen die needlessly.

To think that children could die needlessly at school because of a Food Allergy is just................[i]unthinkable[/i].

I mean, I STILL CAN'T FIGURE OUT WHY CERTAIN ITEMS HAVE TO BE EATEN [i]IN MY SON'S CLASSROOM.[/i] THERE ARE OTHER PLACES TO EAT IT.

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:46

Quote:Originally posted by ALLERGYMOM:
[b]Waving back at ya [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I would like to see your letter.

[/b]

i don't know if this place is ready to see that side of me............... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

ps........I'M GONNA NEED A BIGGER SCANNER.

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:51

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
I mean, I STILL CAN'T FIGURE OUT WHY CERTAIN ITEMS HAVE TO BE EATEN [i]IN MY SON'S CLASSROOM.[/i] THERE ARE OTHER PLACES TO EAT IT.[/b]

statistics on inhallation exposures aside..........there is something called "cross contamination". Children are quite skilled at it.

Groups: None
By ALLERGYMOM on Mon, 08-30-04, 03:59

I dont think anyone has seen a post from me like the one I just posted [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I am usually very quit and dont like confrintation(sp)

But I am so stressed right now with MFA DS starting school in a week I am on overload.

So far our school has been great. The SCHOOL were the ones who brought up putting the ban in place. Its only his classroom and eating area not the entire school.

------------------
Have A Great Day

Groups: None
By smartalyk on Mon, 08-30-04, 04:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] statistics on inhallation exposures aside..........there is something called "cross contamination". Children are quite skilled at it.

[/b]

And it only takes 1 / 44 000 of a peanut to cause a reaction. A smudge on a doorknob would do it. Acckk. How can people not see the reality here?

Must be the forest and trees thing again, eh Momma Bear? (Sorry I am Canadian and eh was the only word that fit [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] )

Groups: None
By ALLERGYMOM on Mon, 08-30-04, 04:02

I think people need to realize that SADLY DEADLY food allergies are on the rise and wont be such a minority. So there are going to be more and more bans put into place.

------------------
Have A Great Day

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 04:04

Quote:Originally posted by smartalyk:
[b] How can people not see the reality here?

[/b]

tell me about it!

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited August 30, 2004).]

Groups: None
By MommaBear on Mon, 08-30-04, 04:07

hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. [i]Illinois State Advisory Council on the Education of Children With Disabilities.[/i]

[url="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm"]http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm[/url]

[i]still wondering if there are any nurses on the council........[/i]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Groups: None
By smartalyk on Mon, 08-30-04, 04:11

Btw, MB, I have to comment about the 99.9% statistic. In order for that statistic to be POSSIBLE (never mind correct), there would have to be at least 1000 children in that small community school... because if 1 child is PA and 999 are not then 99.9% would be possible. Unless of course, they are considering the PA child to be less than one person. Hmmmmmm.

Groups: None
By smartalyk on Mon, 08-30-04, 04:15

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. [i]Illinois State Advisory Council on the Education of Children With Disabilities.[/i]

[url="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm"]http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm[/url]

[i]still wondering if there are any nurses on the council........[/i]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img][/b]

Perhaps there is an opening for a tenth parent? You really should look into it. (Not that you aren't busy with other things [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] )

Groups: None

Peanut Free and Nut Free Directory

Our directory is highlights our favorite products for people with peanut and nut allergies.