reactions

11 replies [Last post]
By ccs0909 on Wed, 01-11-06, 12:58

I've been reading over the posts on the site, particularly those for adult-onset. I've been having weird symptoms for a few months but I never connected it with food allergies until I had a more noticeable and immediate reaction last night.

Can someone tell me if this sounds nuts (no pun intended!): is it possible that swelling under the eyes and other reactions (such as achy joints or skin rash) can be worse on one side of the body than the other? I find this to be very odd and would like to research the answer before I go to my doctor with such an strange symptom!

Thanks!
Colleen

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By TNAmom on Wed, 01-11-06, 13:46

When my daughter had her reaction to cashews, just one eye swelled up. The other looked normal.

A few minutes later she began vomiting and complaining about her throat feeling funny. That's when I knew something bad was happening.

But to look at her, just one puffy eye was visible. No hives, no rash.

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By on Wed, 01-11-06, 14:45

Hi Colleen.

I've never had one side of the body affected - but I have had different parts. Sometimes just the trunk of my body. Sometimes everything above the neck. The weirdest for me was once I got these giant hives in the back of my knee. They all joined together and I couldn't bend my legs. Try walking two blocks to pick your kids up from school when you can't bend your legs. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img]

So, although I've never personally had swelling/rash on one side of my body, I definitely feel it's a possiblilty for someone else.

Have you noticed this after eating any specific food?

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By ccs0909 on Wed, 01-11-06, 19:41

I've never noticed any reaction to a specific food. It's always been more a matter of, "Hey, honey! Look at this swelling under my eyes!"

Last night, it happened after eating a Thai peanut noodle dish. While lying in bed, with swollen and itchy eyes (especially on the one side), I was thinking over some health problems I've been having for about three months. I was remembering that my problems often clear up on the weekends, and days when my husband is off work: those are days that I do not eat peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

I don't suppose it's a full-blown allergy as others experience, but I have a feeling there might be some sort of sensitivity at work here.

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By on Wed, 01-11-06, 22:48

Quote:Originally posted by ccs0909:
[b]I don't suppose it's a full-blown allergy as others experience, but I have a feeling there might be some sort of sensitivity at work here.[/b]

There are allergies. And there are not-allergies. There really isn't a middle road. Minor reactions do not mean *less-allergic*. And minor reactions can become severe.

Since it appears you've noticed a co-relation between peanuts and what sounds like it might be an allergic reaction, I would suggest 1. stop eating peanuts and peanut butter. 2. talk to a doctor - possibly get allergy testing done. 3. keep some bendryl (or other anti-histamine) in your home - carry some with you.

Did you happen to take any antihistamines, and did it make a difference?

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By Jimmy's mom on Thu, 01-12-06, 02:15

ccs0909, have you ever had chicken pox? I ask because your symptoms sound like shingles, which only people who have had chicken pox can get. I'm not a medical professional, but have known people with shingles, and it sounds like it.

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By ccs0909 on Sat, 01-14-06, 01:45

Yes, I have had chicken pox. I read the description of shingles at WebMD and it doesn't really apply. The rash I was mentioning is fairly localized. I thought it might be a yeast thing, because it is on my nipple and I'm a breastfeeding mother. I treated for yeast and it didn't help. However, since eliminating peanuts from my diet, it's cleared up. Almost immediately.

Now that all my symptoms are almost gone, I'm going to have to eat some peanuts again to see what happens.

One other "reaction" question, for anyone who has read down this far in the post. I noticed on one website that being underweight can be a food allergy symptom. I have had problems off and on, where I simply cannot keep weight on, no matter how much I seem to eat. And I was always filling up on peanuts, thinking that the fat and protein would help put on some pounds. When I decided to go off peanuts, my first concern was that I was going to lose too much weight. Oddly enough, even though it's only been a few days, my weight has gone up to my ideal body weight. And it's just sitting there! Hurrah! Eliminating the food did not cause me the weight-loss out-of-control problems I usually have! Is this a coincidence? If there's something to this peanut allergy for me, I'm starting to wonder how much damage I've done to my body all this time!

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By ccs0909 on Sat, 01-14-06, 01:48

[quote]Originally posted by AnnaMarie:
[B] There are allergies. And there are not-allergies. There really isn't a middle road. Minor reactions do not mean *less-allergic*. And minor reactions can become severe.

I guess I never considered that I had a problem because all you ever hear about is the extreme, such as the girl who died after kissing her boyfriend. I never connected "fatigue" after eating PB&J with a peanut allergy. I just figured I'd not had enough food to raise my blood sugar.

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By falcon on Sat, 01-14-06, 03:08

Only one side of my son's face swelled up during one of his reactions.

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By McCobbre on Sat, 01-14-06, 04:09

Quote:Originally posted by ccs0909:
[b]
I guess I never considered that I had a problem because all you ever hear about is the extreme, such as the girl who died after kissing her boyfriend. I never connected "fatigue" after eating PB&J with a peanut allergy. I just figured I'd not had enough food to raise my blood sugar. [/b]

There are all different kinds of allergic reactions, and you never know from reaction to reaction how they're going to turn out. And you don't even know once a reaction has started how it's going to end up really. That's why it's so important that you go to the doctor and get tested and carry an Epipen at all times if you're PA (peanut allergic).

For example: I recently got results back that I have a shellfish allergy. My reactions are only gastrointestinal, but I've had a severe one. As it turns out, I'm as allergic to shrimp as my son is to peanuts (class 3--highly allergic), yet his throat closes, and he vomits upon ingestion. He has airborne reactions, and I don't (yet, knock on wood).

I have tested positive with a skin prick test for peanut and recently with two diffent blood test panels, I've tested negative for peanut. Yet I have reactions--just GI really (one exception), I've even felt "just tired" and "bad" after eating a may contain chocolate--twice.

All that is to say that there are a range of reactions.

Just to be safe, you should be carrying a small vial of children's benadryl with you in your purse until you get to a doctor. Bubble gum tastes nasty; cherry is better. Still too sweet. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] The purple children's Triaminic cough strips that melt and fit in your wallet are the same thing as a dose of children's benadryl, btw. I don't know if it's as effective as liquid benadryl until you get tested and get an epi (if you're found to be allergic). But it has worked as fast for me one time. It's just that my reactions are GI, so liquid benadryl hitting my stomach actually [i]feels[/i]good.

That's more than you wanted to know, I'm sure. But I won't charge you too much, either. Good luck.

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By on Sat, 01-14-06, 15:55

Hey McCobbre, glad to *see* your sense of humour is still intact. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Since I can dry swallow pills, I just carry around adult strength benedryl. I also carry children's chewable tablets for my son though.

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By Arlene on Sat, 01-14-06, 16:38

ccs...You may think about elimanating peanuts from your diet since you are breastfeeding. There are chances that your child could develop a peanut allergy through your breastmilk. Im not an expert on this as i didnt breastfeed but im sure someone else will be more of a help here.

Edited to add...also since you suspect a peanut allergy i wouldnt risk trying peanuts again untill you get the allclear from the test results...maybe the next time you tried some you would have a bad reaction and since you do not have any epipens this could be very dangerous. I would make an appointment with an allergist ASAP.

[This message has been edited by Arlene (edited January 14, 2006).]

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